Innovations in Heat Exchangers

A special issue of Inventions (ISSN 2411-5134). This special issue belongs to the section "Inventions and Innovation in Energy and Thermal/Fluidic Science".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 May 2024 | Viewed by 4225

Special Issue Editor


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Guest Editor
Faculty of Environmental, Geomatic and Energy Engineering, Kielce University of Technology, 25-314 Kielce, Poland
Interests: heat transfer; heat exchangers; thermal comfort; numerical simulations; environmental measurements
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Heat exchangers are crucial elements in various mechanical, electronic, and other devices. They can be found in a broad range of applications, from simple tools to space systems. The need for more efficient cooling/heating and transferring ever-growing heat fluxes requires a search for novel, high-performance heat exchangers. This Special Issue plans to provide an overview of recent advances in the area of heat exchangers. Papers dealing with the design peculiarities, mathematical modelling, numerical simulations, and experimental tests on novel heat exchangers are especially welcome.

Potential topics include, but are not limited to:

  • advanced materials for heat exchangers
  • composite heat exchangers
  • heat transfer enhancement in heat exchangers
  • nanofluids
  • novel designs of heat exchangers
  • numerical modelling/experimental research of heat exchangers
  • single phase/phase-change heat exchangers
  • clogging of the heat exchangers and the solution for this
  • combustion devices.

Dr. Lukasz Orman
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Inventions is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • heat exchanger
  • heat transfer enhancement
  • nanofluids
  • simulations and modelling

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

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24 pages, 10693 KiB  
Article
A Modified Enthalpic Lattice Boltzmann Method for Simulating Conjugate Heat Transfer Problems in Non-Homogeneous Media
by Vinicius Akyo Matsuda, Ivan Talão Martins, Debora Carneiro Moreira, Luben Cabezas-Gómez and Enio Pedone Bandarra Filho
Inventions 2024, 9(3), 57; https://doi.org/10.3390/inventions9030057 - 13 May 2024
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Abstract
In this study, we introduced modifications to a prior existing enthalpic lattice Boltzmann method (LBM) tailored for simulating the conjugate heat transfer phenomena in non-homogeneous media with time-dependent thermal properties. Our approach is based upon the incorporation of the remaining terms of a [...] Read more.
In this study, we introduced modifications to a prior existing enthalpic lattice Boltzmann method (LBM) tailored for simulating the conjugate heat transfer phenomena in non-homogeneous media with time-dependent thermal properties. Our approach is based upon the incorporation of the remaining terms of a conservative energy equation, excluding only the terms regarding flow compressibility and viscous dissipation, thereby accounting for the local and transient variations in the thermophysical properties. The solutions of verification tests, comprising assessments of both transient and steady-state solutions, validated the accuracy of the proposed model, further bolstering its reliability for analyzing heat transfer processes. The modified model was then used to perform an analysis on structured cavities under free convection, revealing compelling insights, particularly regarding transient regimes, demonstrating that the structured cavities exhibit a beneficial impact on enhancing the heat transfer processes, hence providing insights for potential design enhancements in heat exchangers. These results demonstrate the potential of our modified enthalpic LBM approach for simulating complex heat transfer phenomena in non-homogeneous media and structured geometries, offering valuable results for heat exchanger engineering and optimization. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Innovations in Heat Exchangers)
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17 pages, 2653 KiB  
Article
Enhanced Heat Transfer in Thermoelectric Generator Heat Exchanger for Sustainable Cold Chain Logistics: Entropy and Exergy Analysis
by Yunchi Fu and Yanzhe Li
Inventions 2024, 9(2), 42; https://doi.org/10.3390/inventions9020042 - 15 Apr 2024
Viewed by 878
Abstract
This study investigates the application of thermoelectric power generation devices in conjunction with cold chain logistics transport vehicles, focusing on their efficiency and performance. Our experimental results highlight the impact of thermoelectric module characteristics, such as thermal conductivity and the filling thickness of [...] Read more.
This study investigates the application of thermoelectric power generation devices in conjunction with cold chain logistics transport vehicles, focusing on their efficiency and performance. Our experimental results highlight the impact of thermoelectric module characteristics, such as thermal conductivity and the filling thickness of copper foam, on the energy utilization efficiency of the system. The specific experimental setup involved a simulated logistics cold chain transport vehicle exhaust waste heat recovery thermoelectric power generation system, consisting of a high-temperature exhaust heat exchanger channel and two side cooling water tanks. Thermoelectric modules (TEMs) were installed between the heat exchanger and the water tanks to use the temperature difference and convert heat energy into electrical energy. The analysis demonstrates that using high-performance thermoelectric modules with a lower thermal conductivity results in better utilization of the temperature difference for power generation. Additionally, the insertion of porous metal copper foam within the heat exchanger channel enhances convective heat transfer, leading to an improved performance. Furthermore, the study examines the concepts of exergy and entropy generation, providing insights into the system energy conversion processes and efficiency. Overall, this research offers valuable insights for optimizing the design and operation of thermoelectric generators in cold chain logistics transport vehicles to enhance energy utilization and sustainability. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Innovations in Heat Exchangers)
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15 pages, 3611 KiB  
Article
The Influence of Nusselt Correlation on Exergy Efficiency of a Plate Heat Exchanger Operating with TiO2:SiO2/EG:DI Hybrid Nanofluid
by Sylwia Wciślik
Inventions 2024, 9(1), 11; https://doi.org/10.3390/inventions9010011 - 9 Jan 2024
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Abstract
This paper studies how the correlation with the Nusselt number affects the final result of the efficiency, ε, and exergy efficiency, ηex, of a chevron-type gasketed plate heat exchanger, which is installed in a typical small solar installation dedicated to [...] Read more.
This paper studies how the correlation with the Nusselt number affects the final result of the efficiency, ε, and exergy efficiency, ηex, of a chevron-type gasketed plate heat exchanger, which is installed in a typical small solar installation dedicated to single-family housing; the solar fluid is a TiO2:SiO2/EG:DI hybrid nanofluid with concentrations from 0% to 1.5% vol. The experimental model assumes constant flow of the solar fluid and varies on the domestic hot water side—from 3 lpm to 6 lpm. The inlet temperatures are 30 °C and 60 °C on the cold and hot sides of the heat exchanger, respectively. Of the six analysed correlations that showed similar trends, it is concluded that for the assumed flow conditions, geometry, and chevron angle of the plate heat exchanger, one model is the most accurate. The largest difference between the ηex values for a given concentration is 3.4%, so the exergy efficiency is not affected by the chosen Nusselt model by very much. However, the choice of correlation with the Nusselt number significantly affects the efficiency, ε; the difference between the values obtained within a given concentration is more than 40% and depends on the Reynolds number and flow. Most research discusses the scenario with the nanofluid as a coolant. This paper considers the opposite situation in which the solar fluid is a hotter working medium that transfers heat to domestic hot water installation. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Innovations in Heat Exchangers)
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Review

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30 pages, 5535 KiB  
Review
Potential of 3D Printing for Heat Exchanger Heat Transfer Optimization—Sustainability Perspective
by Beata Anwajler
Inventions 2024, 9(3), 60; https://doi.org/10.3390/inventions9030060 - 16 May 2024
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Abstract
In just a few short years, the additive manufacturing (AM) technology known as 3D printing has experienced intense growth from a niche technology to a disruptive innovation that has captured the imagination of mainstream manufacturers and hobbyists alike. The purpose of this article [...] Read more.
In just a few short years, the additive manufacturing (AM) technology known as 3D printing has experienced intense growth from a niche technology to a disruptive innovation that has captured the imagination of mainstream manufacturers and hobbyists alike. The purpose of this article is to introduce the use of 3D printing for specific applications, materials, and manufacturing processes that help to optimize heat transfer in heat exchangers, with an emphasis on sustainability. The ability to create complex geometries, customize designs, and use advanced materials provides opportunities for more efficient and stable heat transfer solutions. One of the key benefits of incremental technology is the potential reduction in material waste compared to traditional manufacturing methods. By optimizing the design and structure of heat transfer components, 3D printing enables lighter yet more efficient solutions and systems. The localized manufacturing of components, which reduces the need for intensive transportation and associated carbon emissions, can lead to reduced energy consumption and improved overall efficiency. The customization and flexibility of 3D printing enables the integration of heat transfer components into renewable energy systems. This article presents the key challenges to be addressed and the fundamental research needed to realize the full potential of incremental manufacturing technologies to optimize heat transfer in heat exchangers. It also presents a critical discussion and outlook for solving global energy challenges through innovative incremental manufacturing technologies in the heat exchanger sector. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Innovations in Heat Exchangers)
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