Inspection, Assessment, Retrofitting & Strengthening of Civil Infrastructure

A special issue of Infrastructures (ISSN 2412-3811).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 September 2023) | Viewed by 5450

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Department of Architectural and Civil Engineering, Chalmers University of Technology, Sven Hultins Gata 6, 41296 Gothenburg, Sweden
Interests: strengthening and repair of structures; application of fiber polymer composite (FPC) materials in construction; environmental durability of FPC materials and systems
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Guest Editor
College of Engineering, Department of Civil Engineering, American University of Sharjah, Sharjah, United Arab Emirates
Interests: FRP strengthening of RC structures; fire performance of FRP strengthened structures; computational modeling
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Guest Editor
Department of Civil and Industrial Engineering, University of Pisa, Pisa, Italy
Interests: strengthening; repair; fibre-reinforced polymer; composite materials; fracture mechanics; inspection; assessment
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

In this Special Issue, we request high-quality original research articles focused on the state-of-the-art techniques and methods addressing the inspection, assessment, retrofitting, and strengthening of civil infrastructure. We welcome experimental, theoretical, and numerical papers of high technical standards across various branches in the construction sector; thus, improving awareness around experimental and numerical techniques and methods applicable to buildings that may also be relevant to other structures.

Topics of interest include, but are not limited to:

  • Advances in inspection, sensoring, and structural health monitoring (SHM) methods and technologies for bridges and structures;
  • Advances in assessment methods for existing structures;
  • New innovative materials and techniques for repair and strengthening of existing structures;
  • Long-term behaviour and durability, and fire resistance of repaired and strengthened structures;
  • Fire resistance and performance of strengthening construction materials and repaired systems;
  • Design codes and guidelines;
  • Recent case studies;
  • Advances in management of maintenance works and planning.

Dr. Reza Haghani
Prof. Dr. Rami Hawileh
Dr. Paolo Sebastiano Valvo
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Infrastructures is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

24 pages, 624 KiB  
Article
Transferring Research Innovations in Bridge Inspection Planning to Bridge Inspection Practice: A Qualitative Study
by Abdelrahman M. Abdallah, Mehmet E. Ozbek and Rebecca A. Atadero
Infrastructures 2023, 8(11), 164; https://doi.org/10.3390/infrastructures8110164 - 20 Nov 2023
Viewed by 1739
Abstract
Over the last two decades, many researchers have focused on providing new ideas and frameworks to help improve conventional bridge inspection planning approaches, however, little guidance is provided for implementing these new ideas in practice, resulting in limited change. Accordingly, this qualitative study [...] Read more.
Over the last two decades, many researchers have focused on providing new ideas and frameworks to help improve conventional bridge inspection planning approaches, however, little guidance is provided for implementing these new ideas in practice, resulting in limited change. Accordingly, this qualitative study aims to identify the factors that can help improve research products and accelerate research transfer to bridge inspection departments with the goal of enhancing bridge inspection practice. This study used semi-structured interviews, written interviews, and questionnaires for data collection to provide rich results. Responses from twenty-six bridge personnel from state Departments of Transportation (DOTs) across the United States (U.S.) were included in this study. The study found that most participants support a fixed inspection interval over a variable interval since fixed intervals are easier in scheduling and budget planning. Also, participants indicated that the barriers hindering the use of nondestructive techniques are the training required by inspectors, traffic control, and the required access equipment. The study presents the factors change leaders should focus on to facilitate organizational change in DOTs such as enhancing the capacity of DOT staff members and gaining support from the Federal Highway Administration (FHWA) Full article
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14 pages, 20810 KiB  
Article
Free Shrinkage Strains of Box Girders with Concrete Overlays
by Maria Giulia Parmiani and Luis Orta
Infrastructures 2023, 8(5), 96; https://doi.org/10.3390/infrastructures8050096 - 18 May 2023
Viewed by 1130
Abstract
The aging of reinforced concrete structures is one of the biggest concerns in civil engineering today since billions of dollars are spent annually on deck repairs and replacements. This study focuses on the rehabilitation of reinforced concrete box girders used in bridge construction. [...] Read more.
The aging of reinforced concrete structures is one of the biggest concerns in civil engineering today since billions of dollars are spent annually on deck repairs and replacements. This study focuses on the rehabilitation of reinforced concrete box girders used in bridge construction. Bridge rehabilitation with a new concrete overlay possesses many challenges that involve cracking and debonding of the overlay caused by the restraining effect of the substrate. This effect leads to the development of tension stresses in the overlay, compression stresses in the substrate, and shear stresses at the interface. In order to mitigate this type of cracking and to ensure a desirable monolithic structural behavior of the rehabilitated bridge, a long-term assessment of the free shrinkage strains acting in the overlay is necessary. This study conducts a two-dimension finite element analysis of a reinforced concrete box girder bridge to evaluate humidity and free shrinkage strain profiles at different times. The humidity gradient between the overlay and the substrate generates differential volume changes between substrate and overlay. The substrate deformations are negligible, while the overlay is subjected to high shrinkage; 78% of the ultimate shrinkage strain is reached after 3 years, indicating a high susceptibility to cracking. Full article
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15 pages, 10451 KiB  
Article
Experimental Investigations of Cement Clay Interlocking Brick Masonry Structures Strengthened with CFRP and Cement-Sand Mortar
by Panuwat Joyklad, Hafiz Ahmad Waqas, Abdul Hafeez, Nazam Ali, Ali Ejaz, Qudeer Hussain, Kaffayatullah Khan, Arissaman Sangthongtong and Panumas Saingam
Infrastructures 2023, 8(3), 59; https://doi.org/10.3390/infrastructures8030059 - 20 Mar 2023
Cited by 5 | Viewed by 2109
Abstract
Many masonry structures are constructed with cement clay interlocking brick (CCIB) due to its added benefits. Recent research has demonstrated the vulnerability of brick masonry walls against seismic loading. Various strengthening materials and techniques are extensively used to improve the structural behavior of [...] Read more.
Many masonry structures are constructed with cement clay interlocking brick (CCIB) due to its added benefits. Recent research has demonstrated the vulnerability of brick masonry walls against seismic loading. Various strengthening materials and techniques are extensively used to improve the structural behavior of brick walls. Carbon fiber-reinforced polymer (CFRP) composites are the most popular strengthening material due to their advantages of easy application, lightweight qualities, and superior tensile strength. The current research work aimed to explore the cost-effective solutions and feasibility of CFRP composite-based strengthening techniques to improve the load-bearing capacity of CCIB walls. Various configurations and combinations of strengthening materials were investigated to customize the cost of repair and strengthening. The experimental results indicated that CFRP composites in combination with cement-sand (CS) mortar are an efficient strengthening material to enhance the strength and ultimate deflection of CCIB walls. The ultimate load-bearing capacity and axial deformation of the strengthened CCIB wall (using two layers of CFRP strips and CS mortar of 10 mm thickness) remained 171% and 190% larger than the unstrengthened CCIB wall. The conclusions of this study are expected to enhance the seismic performance of masonry buildings in developing countries. It should be noted that due to the reduced number of tested specimens, the results to be assumed as general considerations need a wider experimental campaign and a large numbers of tests for each strengthening typology. Full article
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