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Novel Development and Therapy in Neovascular Retinal Diseases

A special issue of International Journal of Molecular Sciences (ISSN 1422-0067). This special issue belongs to the section "Molecular Pathology, Diagnostics, and Therapeutics".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 October 2023) | Viewed by 4857

Special Issue Editors

Department of Ophthalmology, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Linkou Medical Center, Taoyuan 333, Taiwan
Interests: retinopathy of prematurity; retinal detachment; macular degeneration and treatment; cataract surgery

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

We are pleased to announce the Special Issue entitled “Novel Development, Management and Therapy in Neovascular Retinal Diseases” that aims to collect scientific publications related to neovascular retinal diseases. Neovascular retinal diseases, such as age-related macular degeneration (AMD), diabetic retinopathy (DR), and retinopathy of prematury (ROP), are major causes of vision loss in both adult and pediatric populations. They have caused a heavy burden in the health care system globally. Neovascularization is the proliferation of new blood vessels. These are called intraretinal microvascular abnormalities when the lesion was limited within retina, and retinal neovascularization when these new blood vessels grow to the surface of the retina. Although the reasons to cause neovascularization in retina might vary in different disease entities, neovascularization could result in macular edema due to the breakage of vessel tight junction, vitreous hemorrhage, and retinal detachment if causing vitreous traction on the retina. These pathologies could result in neuronal damage and poor vision of the patients. Recent advances in retinal imaging, telemedicine, surgical instrumentations, molecular sciences, target therapy, such as anti-vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) have revolutionized we way we take care of these patients with neurovascular retinal disease. The exploration of these new developments could result in better understanding of disease pathogenesis, and generation of novel management and new therapy for the patients.

In this Special Issue, we target on all aspects of  neovascular retinal diseases. Research articles, review articles, case series, as well as communications are welcomed.

Dr. Wei-Chi Wu
Dr. Jay Chhablani
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Molecular Sciences is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. There is an Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal. For details about the APC please see here. Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • age-related macular degeneration
  • anti-vascular endothelial growth factor
  • diabetic retinopathy
  • macular edema
  • neovascularization
  • retinal detachment
  • retinopathy of prematurity
  • vitreous hemorrhage

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

10 pages, 2434 KiB  
Article
Retrospective Analysis of Surgical Outcomes on Axial Length Elongation in Eyes with Posterior and Combined Persistent Fetal Vasculature
by Heng-Chiao Huang, Chien-Hsiung Lai, Eugene Yu-Chuan Kang, Kuan-Jen Chen, Nan-Kai Wang, Laura Liu, Yih-Shiou Hwang, Chi-Chun Lai and Wei-Chi Wu
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2023, 24(6), 5836; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms24065836 - 19 Mar 2023
Viewed by 1437
Abstract
This study aims to investigate the outcomes and risk factors associated with poor vision (vision less than counting fingers, 2.0 logMAR, Snellen vision 20/2000) in patients with posterior or combined persistent fetal vasculature (PFV), with or without surgery. We retrospectively reviewed the medical [...] Read more.
This study aims to investigate the outcomes and risk factors associated with poor vision (vision less than counting fingers, 2.0 logMAR, Snellen vision 20/2000) in patients with posterior or combined persistent fetal vasculature (PFV), with or without surgery. We retrospectively reviewed the medical records of patients who were diagnosed with PFV from January 2008 to April 2021. We included 51 eyes of 44 patients who presented with PFV, of which 38 eyes underwent surgical correction (pars plicata/plana vitrectomy, with or without lensectomy, and intraocular lens implantation) at the median age of 6.0 months (range: 0.7 to 82.0). The mean follow-up was 68.8 months ± 38.0 months. The axial length change in the eyes undergoing surgery was significantly higher than the eyes without surgery (p = 0.025). Initial anterior chamber collapse and retinal detachment were associated with poor vision (p = 0.006 and p = 0.002, respectively). In addition, 37% of eyes with posterior or combined PFV had vision better than counting fingers. Surgery for eyes with PFV could result in better eye growth. Visual outcomes remained poor and were associated with the level of macular abnormality. Initial anterior chamber collapse and retinal detachment at presentation were the risk factors for poor visual outcomes. Vitrectomy for selected PFV eyes is valuable and associated with a better cosmetic outcome (better eye growth). Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Novel Development and Therapy in Neovascular Retinal Diseases)
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10 pages, 257 KiB  
Article
Effects of TIMP-2 Polymorphisms on Retinopathy of Prematurity Risk, Severity, Recurrence, and Treatment Response
by Pei-Liang Wu, Xiao Chun Ling, Eugene Yu-Chuan Kang, Kuan-Jen Chen, Nan-Kai Wang, Laura Liu, Yen-Po Chen, Yih-Shiou Hwang, Chi-Chun Lai, Shun-Fa Yang and Wei-Chi Wu
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2022, 23(22), 14199; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms232214199 - 17 Nov 2022
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1200
Abstract
Tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinases (TIMPs) play a crucial role in endogenous angiogenesis besides the regulation of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) activity. Associations between TIMP-2 gene polymorphisms and the risk of retinopathy of prematurity (ROP) were examined. Premature infants born between 2009 and 2018 were [...] Read more.
Tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinases (TIMPs) play a crucial role in endogenous angiogenesis besides the regulation of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) activity. Associations between TIMP-2 gene polymorphisms and the risk of retinopathy of prematurity (ROP) were examined. Premature infants born between 2009 and 2018 were included. Five single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of TIMP-2 were analyzed with real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Multivariate logistic regression was applied to model associations between TIMP-2 polymorphisms and ROP susceptibility and severity. The GA+AA genotype in individuals with the TIMP-2 polymorphism of rs12600817 was associated with a higher risk of ROP (odds ratio [OR]: 1.518, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.028–2.242) compared with their wild-type genotypes. The AA genotype (OR: 1.962, 95% CI: 1.023–3.762) and the AA+GA genotype (OR: 1.686, 95% CI: 1.030–2.762) in individuals with the rs12600817 polymorphism had higher risks of severe, treatment-requiring ROP relative to their wild-type counterparts. In patients with treatment-requiring ROP, the AG+GG genotypes in the TIMP-2 polymorphism of rs2889529 were correlated with the treatment response (p = 0.035). The TIMP-2 polymorphism of rs12600817 help in predicting ROP risks in preterm infants, while the polymorphism of rs2889529 can serve as a genetic marker in evaluating the ROP treatment response. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Novel Development and Therapy in Neovascular Retinal Diseases)
10 pages, 602 KiB  
Article
The Association of Erythropoietin and Age-Related Macular Degeneration in Hemodialysis Patients: A Nationwide Population-Based Cohort Study
by Evelyn-Jou-Chen Huang, Fung-Chang Sung, Peir-Haur Hung, Chih-Hsin Muo, Meei-Maan Wu and Chih-Ching Yeh
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2022, 23(17), 9634; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms23179634 - 25 Aug 2022
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1522
Abstract
This population-based retrospective cohort study investigated the effectiveness of erythropoietin (EPO) treatment in reducing the risk of age-related macular degeneration (AMD) in hemodialysis patients, using the National Health Insurance Research Data of Taiwan. From the database, we identified 147,318 end-stage renal disease (ESRD) [...] Read more.
This population-based retrospective cohort study investigated the effectiveness of erythropoietin (EPO) treatment in reducing the risk of age-related macular degeneration (AMD) in hemodialysis patients, using the National Health Insurance Research Data of Taiwan. From the database, we identified 147,318 end-stage renal disease (ESRD) patients on hemodialysis who had been diagnosed in 2000–2014 to establish the propensity-score-matched EPO user cohort and non-EPO user cohort with equal sample size of 15,992. By the end of 2016, the cumulative incidence of AMD in EPO users was about 3.29% lower than that in non-EPO users (Kaplan–Meier survival p < 0.0001). The risk of AMD was 43% lower in EPO users than in non-EPO users, with an adjusted hazard ratio (aHR) of 0.57 (95% confidence interval (CI) = 0.51–0.64) estimated in the multivariate Cox model. A significant negative dose–response relationship was identified between the EPO dosage and the risk of AMD (p < 0.0001). Another beneficial effect of EPO treatment was a reduced risk of both exudative AMD (aHR = 0.48, 95% CI = 0.40–0.61) and non-exudative AMD (aHR = 0.61, 95% CI = 0.53–0.69), also in similar dose–response relationships (p < 0.0001). Our findings suggest that EPO treatment for hemodialysis patients could reduce AMD risk in a dose–response relationship. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Novel Development and Therapy in Neovascular Retinal Diseases)
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