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Applications of Biomaterials in Drug Development

A special issue of International Journal of Molecular Sciences (ISSN 1422-0067). This special issue belongs to the section "Materials Science".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 August 2024 | Viewed by 2472

Special Issue Editor


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Guest Editor
Department of Pharmaceutical Engineering, Dankook University, Cheonan 31116, Republic of Korea
Interests: drug delivery; nanotechnology; lipid-based emulsions; electrospinning/electrospray techniques; microneedle platforms
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Drug development requires controlling absorption and biodistribution to optimize the therapeutic performance of small molecules and biologics. Biomaterials are essential for drug development because their physicochemical and chemical properties can be properly tailored. These new biomaterials can be used to control the rate of drug release or to target active ingredients to specific tissues or cell populations.

This Special Issue welcomes contributions related to new applications of biomaterials in drug development. Novel strategies aiming to rationalize the application of drug delivery systems and/or material aspects for innovative pharmaceutical development will be considered. Research topics include, but are not limited to, the development of new biomaterials for application in various drug delivery systems related to pharmaceutical development; nanocarriers that target drug release to specific cell types, tissues, or organs; and repurposed biomaterials for novel engineering structures. These aspects will be discussed in terms of new technologies that may expand their applications.

The purpose of this Special Issue is to cover cutting-edge research activities and recent research advances in the application of biomaterials to drug development.

Dr. Sung Giu Jin
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

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Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Molecular Sciences is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. There is an Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal. For details about the APC please see here. Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • drug delivery systems
  • nanomaterials
  • pharmaceutical engineering
  • targeting
  • solubilization technology
  • controlled release
  • microneedle
  • biopolymers

Published Papers (2 papers)

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14 pages, 3455 KiB  
Article
Enhanced Stability and Improved Oral Absorption of Enzalutamide with Self-Nanoemulsifying Drug Delivery System
by Su-Min Lee, Jeong-Gyun Lee, Tae-Han Yun, Jung-Hyun Cho and Kyeong-Soo Kim
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2024, 25(2), 1197; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms25021197 - 18 Jan 2024
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 924
Abstract
The purpose of this study is to develop and evaluate a self-nanoemulsifying drug delivery system (SNEDDS) to improve the oral absorption of poorly water-soluble enzalutamide (ENZ). Considering the rapid recrystallization of the drug, based on solubility and crystallization tests in various oils, surfactants [...] Read more.
The purpose of this study is to develop and evaluate a self-nanoemulsifying drug delivery system (SNEDDS) to improve the oral absorption of poorly water-soluble enzalutamide (ENZ). Considering the rapid recrystallization of the drug, based on solubility and crystallization tests in various oils, surfactants and co-surfactants, Labrafac PG 10%, Solutol HS15 80%, and Transcutol P 10%, which showed the most stable particle size and polydispersity index (PDI) without drug precipitation, were selected as the optimal SNEDDS formulation. The optimized SNEDDS formulation showed excellent dissolution profiles for all the drugs released at 10 min of dissolution due to the increased surface area with a small particle size of approximately 16 nm. Additionally, it was confirmed to be stable without significant differences in physical and chemical properties for 6 months under accelerated conditions (40 ± 2 °C, 75 ± 5% RH) and stressed conditions (60 ± 2 °C). Associated with the high dissolutions of ENZ, pharmacokinetic parameters were also greatly improved. Specifically, the AUC was 1.9 times higher and the Cmax was 1.8 times higher than those of commercial products (Xtandi® soft capsule), resulting in improved oral absorption. Taken together with the results mentioned above, the SNEDDS could be an effective tool as a formulation for ENZ and other similar drugs. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Applications of Biomaterials in Drug Development)
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13 pages, 2081 KiB  
Article
Development of Novel Tamsulosin Pellet-Loaded Oral Disintegrating Tablet Bioequivalent to Commercial Capsule in Beagle Dogs Using Microcrystalline Cellulose and Mannitol
by Hyuk Jun Cho, Jung Suk Kim, Sung Giu Jin and Han-Gon Choi
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2023, 24(20), 15393; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms242015393 - 20 Oct 2023
Viewed by 1268
Abstract
In this study, we developed a tamsulosin pellet-loaded orally disintegrating tablet (ODT) that is bioequivalent to commercially available products and has improved patient compliance using microcrystalline cellulose (MCC) and mannitol. Utilizing the fluid bed technique, the drug, sustained release (SR) layer, and enteric [...] Read more.
In this study, we developed a tamsulosin pellet-loaded orally disintegrating tablet (ODT) that is bioequivalent to commercially available products and has improved patient compliance using microcrystalline cellulose (MCC) and mannitol. Utilizing the fluid bed technique, the drug, sustained release (SR) layer, and enteric layer were sequentially prepared by coating MCC pellets with the drug, HPMC, Kollicoat, and a mixture of Eudragit L and Eudragit NE, respectively, resulting in the production of tamsulosin pellets. The tamsulosin pellet, composed of the MCC pellet, drug layer, SR layer, and enteric layer at a weight ratio of 20:0.8:4.95:6.41, was selected because its dissolution was equivalent to that of the commercial capsule. Tamsulosin pellet-loaded ODTs were prepared using tamsulosin pellets and various co-processed excipients. The tamsulosin pellet-loaded ODT composed of tamsulosin pellets, mannitol–MCC mixture, silicon dioxide, and magnesium stearate at a weight ratio of 32.16:161.84:4.0:2.0 gave the best protective effect on the coating process and a dissolution profile similar to that of the commercial capsule. Finally, no significant differences in beagle dogs were observed in pharmacokinetic parameters, suggesting that they were bioequivalent. In conclusion, tamsulosin pellet-loaded ODTs could be a potential alternative to commercial capsules, improving patient compliance. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Applications of Biomaterials in Drug Development)
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