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Mechanism of Redox Signal Transduction in Plants

A special issue of International Journal of Molecular Sciences (ISSN 1422-0067). This special issue belongs to the section "Molecular Plant Sciences".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (29 February 2024) | Viewed by 8297

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
National Engineering Laboratory of Crop Stress Resistance Breeding, School of Life Sciences, Anhui Agricultural University, Hefei 230036, China
Interests: hydrogen sulfide; reactive oxygen species; nitric oxide; redox homeostasis; antioxidant
School of Food and Biological Engineering, Hefei University of Technology, Hefei 230009, China
Interests: reactive oxygen species (ROS); redox regulation; hydrogen sulfide (H2S); tomato; fruit ripening and senescence; ethylene; abiotic stress

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

As with all aerobic organisms, plants benefit from oxygen while being faced with the challenge of maintaining appropriate redox conditions for their physiology and development in an oxidizing atmosphere. Redox biology and the complex associated network of redox-sensitive factors are now recognized as important in cellular regulation, with reactive molecular species (RMS), such as reactive oxygen/nitrogen species (ROS/RNS) and hydrogen sulfide (H2S), playing crucial roles in responses to adverse environmental cues. It is now proven that ROS/RNS are a necessary part of subcellular and intercellular communication in plants and that some of their signaling functions require ROS metabolizing systems, such as ascorbate and glutathione-related. Furthermore, cysteine-based redox modifications, including sulfenylation, nitrosation, glutathionylation and persulfidation, are proposed to function in redox signaling as reversible molecular switches. However, their signaling networks and transduction mechanisms remain incomplete.

This Special Issue will focus on studies that highlight recent advances in the mechanism of redox signal transduction in plants, including original research articles and reviews aimed at understanding the molecular mechanisms and physiological roles of RMS and their interacting systems under stress and nonstress conditions.

Prof. Dr. Yi Han
Dr. Kangdi Hu
Guest Editors

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Keywords

  • reactive oxygen species
  • reactive nitrogen species
  • hydrogen sulfide
  • persulfidation
  • nitrosation
  • sulfenylation
  • redox modification
  • redox signaling

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

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18 pages, 4543 KiB  
Article
A Hydrogen-Sulfide-Repressed Methionine Synthase SlMS1 Acts as a Positive Regulator for Fruit Ripening in Tomato
by Zhi-Kun Geng, Lin Ma, Yu-Lei Rong, Wan-Jie Li, Gai-Fang Yao, Hua Zhang and Kang-Di Hu
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2022, 23(20), 12239; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms232012239 - 13 Oct 2022
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1639
Abstract
Ethylene is a key phytohormone that regulates the ripening of climacteric fruits, and methionine is an indirect precursor of ethylene. However, whether methionine synthase plays a role in fruit ripening in Solanum lycopersicum (tomato) is still unknown. In this study, we find that [...] Read more.
Ethylene is a key phytohormone that regulates the ripening of climacteric fruits, and methionine is an indirect precursor of ethylene. However, whether methionine synthase plays a role in fruit ripening in Solanum lycopersicum (tomato) is still unknown. In this study, we find that a tomato methionine synthase (named SlMS1), which could be repressed at the transcriptional level by hydrogen sulfide (H2S), acts as a positive regulator for tomato fruit ripening. By a bioinformatics analysis, it is found that SlMS1 and SlMS2 in tomato are highly homologous to methionine synthases in Arabidopsis thaliana. The expression pattern of SlMS1 and SlMS2 is analyzed in tomato, and SlMS1 expression is up-regulated during fruit ripening, suggesting its potential role in regulating fruit ripening. A potential bipartite nuclear localization signal is found in the amino acid sequence of SlMS1; thus, SlMS1 is tagged with GFP and observed in the leaves of Nicotiana benthamiana. Consistently, SlMS1-GFP shows strong nuclear localization and also cytoplasmic localization. The role of SlMS1 in regulating fruit ripening is investigated in tomato fruit by transient silencing (virus-induced gene silencing, VIGS) and transient overexpression. The results show that SlMS1 silencing causes delayed fruit ripening, evidenced by more chlorophyll and less carotenoid accumulation, while SlMS1 overexpression accelerates fruit ripening significantly compared with control. Further investigation shows that SlMS1 overexpression could up-regulate the expression of carotenoid-synthesis-related genes (PSY1, PDS, ZDS), chlorophyll-degradation-related genes (NYC1, PAO, PPH, SGR1), cell-wall-metabolism-related genes (CEL2, EXP, PG, TBG4, XTH5) and ethylene-synthesis-pathway-related genes (ACO1, ACO3, ACS2), while SlMS1 silencing causes the opposite results. The correlation analysis indicates that SlMS1 expression is negatively correlated with chlorophyll content and positively correlated with carotenoid and ripening-related gene expressions. Taken together, our data suggest that SlMS1 is a positive regulator of tomato fruit ripening and a possible target gene for the ripening-delaying effect of H2S. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Mechanism of Redox Signal Transduction in Plants)
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Review

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17 pages, 1507 KiB  
Review
The Role of Reactive Oxygen Species in Plant Response to Radiation
by Yuantao Tan, Yaoke Duan, Qing Chi, Rong Wang, Yue Yin, Dongjie Cui, Shuang Li, Aiying Wang, Ruonan Ma, Bing Li, Zhen Jiao and Hao Sun
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2023, 24(4), 3346; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms24043346 - 08 Feb 2023
Cited by 12 | Viewed by 2817
Abstract
Radiation is widespread in nature, including ultraviolet radiation from the sun, cosmic radiation and radiation emitted by natural radionuclides. Over the years, the increasing industrialization of human beings has brought about more radiation, such as enhanced UV-B radiation due to ground ozone decay, [...] Read more.
Radiation is widespread in nature, including ultraviolet radiation from the sun, cosmic radiation and radiation emitted by natural radionuclides. Over the years, the increasing industrialization of human beings has brought about more radiation, such as enhanced UV-B radiation due to ground ozone decay, and the emission and contamination of nuclear waste due to the increasing nuclear power plants and radioactive material industry. With additional radiation reaching plants, both negative effects including damage to cell membranes, reduction of photosynthetic rate and premature aging and benefits such as growth promotion and stress resistance enhancement have been observed. ROS (Reactive oxygen species) are reactive oxidants in plant cells, including hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), superoxide anions (O2•−) and hydroxide anion radicals (·OH), which may stimulate the antioxidant system of plants and act as signaling molecules to regulate downstream reactions. A number of studies have observed the change of ROS in plant cells under radiation, and new technology such as RNA-seq has molecularly revealed the regulation of radiative biological effects by ROS. This review summarized recent progress on the role of ROS in plant response to radiations including UV, ion beam and plasma, and may help to reveal the mechanisms of plant responses to radiation. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Mechanism of Redox Signal Transduction in Plants)
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37 pages, 4086 KiB  
Review
Biological Functions of Hydrogen Sulfide in Plants
by Zhifeng Yang, Xiaoyu Wang, Jianrong Feng and Shuhua Zhu
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2022, 23(23), 15107; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms232315107 - 01 Dec 2022
Cited by 16 | Viewed by 3156
Abstract
Hydrogen sulfide (H2S), which is a gasotransmitter, can be biosynthesized and participates in various physiological and biochemical processes in plants. H2S also positively affects plants’ adaptation to abiotic stresses. Here, we summarize the specific ways in which H2 [...] Read more.
Hydrogen sulfide (H2S), which is a gasotransmitter, can be biosynthesized and participates in various physiological and biochemical processes in plants. H2S also positively affects plants’ adaptation to abiotic stresses. Here, we summarize the specific ways in which H2S is endogenously synthesized and metabolized in plants, along with the agents and methods used for H2S research, and outline the progress of research on the regulation of H2S on plant metabolism and morphogenesis, abiotic stress tolerance, and the series of different post-translational modifications (PTMs) in which H2S is involved, to provide a reference for future research on the mechanism of H2S action. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Mechanism of Redox Signal Transduction in Plants)
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