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Nanofibrous Membrane

A special issue of International Journal of Molecular Sciences (ISSN 1422-0067). This special issue belongs to the section "Macromolecules".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 January 2021) | Viewed by 2871

Special Issue Editor

Department of Advanced Materials and Chemical Engineering, Daegu Catholic University, Gyeongsan 38430, Republic of Korea
Interests: biomaterials; nanofibrous membranes; bioceramics; synthesis of nanoparticles; composite materials; photodynamic therapy; cancer-targeting drugs; 3D printing; tissue regeneration
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues

Nanofibrous membranes are characterized by a very high surface-to-volume ratio and high porosity with three-dimensionally interconnected microporous structures. Nanofibrous membranes can be prepared to utilize various technologies such as bicomponent extrusion, electrospinning, melt blowing, phase separation, centrifugal spinning, drawing, self-assembly, and template synthesis. The unique features of these membranes make them a strong and excellent candidate for several progressive uses in areas such as superior performance filtration, composite materials, battery separators, electrochemical sensing, and biomedical applications. The use of nanofibrous membranes for biomedical applications has attracted a great deal of attention in the past several years. Nanofibrous membranes have been demonstrated as suitable substrates for tissue engineering, immobilized enzymes and catalysts, wound dressing, barriers for the prevention of post-operative-induced adhesion, and vehicles for controlled drug (gene) delivery. The fabrication of these membranes for biomedical applications often requires an interdisciplinary approach combining physics, chemistry, biology, and engineering.

The aim of this Special Issue is to fabricate and characterize engineered nanofibrous membranes and to evaluate the biological functions of membranes for various biomedical applications. Topics include various fabrication methods, unique characterization, polymer and ceramic functional materials, biomedical applications such as tissue regeneration, drug delivery, etc.

The Special Issue welcomes both original research articles and comprehensive reviews.

Prof. Young-Jin Kim
Guest Editor

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Keywords

  • nanofibrous membrane
  • biomedical application
  • tissue regeneration
  • drug delivery
  • functional material
  • composite material
  • functionalization
  • fabrication

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

16 pages, 3428 KiB  
Article
Dual-Crystallizable Silk Fibroin/Poly(L-lactic Acid) Biocomposite Films: Effect of Polymer Phases on Protein Structures in Protein-Polymer Blends
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2021, 22(4), 1871; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms22041871 - 13 Feb 2021
Cited by 15 | Viewed by 2485
Abstract
Biopolymer composites based on silk fibroin have shown widespread potential due to their brilliant applications in tissue engineering, medicine and bioelectronics. In our present work, biocomposite nanofilms with different special topologies were obtained through blending silk fibroin with crystallizable poly(L-lactic acid) (PLLA) at [...] Read more.
Biopolymer composites based on silk fibroin have shown widespread potential due to their brilliant applications in tissue engineering, medicine and bioelectronics. In our present work, biocomposite nanofilms with different special topologies were obtained through blending silk fibroin with crystallizable poly(L-lactic acid) (PLLA) at various mixture rates using a stirring-reflux condensation blending method. The microstructure, phase components, and miscibility of the blended films were studied through thermal analysis in combination with Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy and Raman analysis. X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscope were also used for advanced structural analysis. Furthermore, their conformation transition, interaction mechanism, and thermal stability were also discussed. The results showed that the hydrogen bonds and hydrophobic interactions existed between silk fibroin (SF) and PLLA polymer chains in the blended films. The secondary structures of silk fibroin and phase components of PLLA in composites vary at different ratios of silk to PLLA. The β-sheet content increased with the increase of the silk fibroin content, while the glass transition temperature was raised mainly due to the rigid amorphous phase presence in the blended system. This results in an increase in thermal stability in blended films compared to the pure silk fibroin films. This study provided detailed insights into the influence of synthetic polymer phases (crystalline, rigid amorphous, and mobile amorphous) on protein secondary structures through blending, which has direct applications on the design and fabrication of novel protein–synthetic polymer composites for the biomedical and green chemistry fields. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nanofibrous Membrane)
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