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Recent Molecular Developments in Obesity

A special issue of International Journal of Molecular Sciences (ISSN 1422-0067). This special issue belongs to the section "Molecular Endocrinology and Metabolism".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 June 2024 | Viewed by 1304

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Local Health Agency, Unit of General Surgery, 44023 Ferrara, Italy
Interests: general surgery; obesity

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Co-Guest Editor
Department of Translational Medicine and for Romagna, University of Ferrara, Ferrara, Italy
Interests: obesity; overweight; risk factors
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Crosstalk between muscle and adipose tissue plays a crucial role in metabolic regulation and overall health. This interplay involves bidirectional communication and reciprocal signaling between these tissues, impacting energy homeostasis and insulin sensitivity. Muscle-secreted myokines, such as irisin and myostatin, exert profound effects on adipocyte metabolism and lipid storage, while adipokines, like adiponectin and leptin, influence muscle function and glucose uptake. Dysregulation of this crosstalk has been implicated in metabolic disorders like obesity and type 2 diabetes. Exercise-induced changes in muscle metabolism can positively impact adipose tissue through improved lipolysis and reduced inflammation, highlighting the therapeutic potential of targeting this inter-tissue communication to combat metabolic diseases. Understanding the intricacies of muscle–adipose crosstalk may lead to innovative therapies promoting metabolic health. 

This Special Issue aims to collect papers on this topic. Contributions are welcome in the form of research papers reporting original results or scientific reviews.

Dr. Nicolò Fabbri
Dr. Angelina Passaro
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Molecular Sciences is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. There is an Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal. For details about the APC please see here. Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • body mass index (BMI)
  • obesity
  • overweight
  • obesity-related disease
  • body fat
  • adiponectin
  • leptin

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

17 pages, 2412 KiB  
Article
Standard Doses of Cholecalciferol Reduce Glucose and Increase Glutamine in Obesity-Related Hypertension: Results of a Randomized Trial
by Catarina Santos, Rui Carvalho, Ana Mafalda Fonseca, Miguel Castelo Branco, Marco Alves and Ivana Jarak
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2024, 25(6), 3416; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms25063416 - 18 Mar 2024
Viewed by 1023
Abstract
In arterial hypertension, the dysregulation of several metabolic pathways is closely associated with chronic immune imbalance and inflammation progression. With time, these disturbances lead to the development of progressive disease and end-organ involvement. However, the influence of cholecalciferol on metabolic pathways as a [...] Read more.
In arterial hypertension, the dysregulation of several metabolic pathways is closely associated with chronic immune imbalance and inflammation progression. With time, these disturbances lead to the development of progressive disease and end-organ involvement. However, the influence of cholecalciferol on metabolic pathways as a possible mechanism of its immunomodulatory activity in obesity-related hypertension is not known. In a phase 2, randomized, single-center, 24-week trial, we evaluated, as a secondary outcome, the serum metabolome of 36 age- and gender-matched adults with obesity-related hypertension and vitamin D deficiency, before and after supplementation with cholecalciferol therapy along with routine medication. The defined endpoint was the assessment of circulating metabolites using a nuclear magnetic resonance-based metabolomics approach. Univariate and multivariate analyses were used to evaluate the systemic metabolic alterations caused by cholecalciferol. In comparison with normotensive controls, hypertensive patients presented overall decreased expression of several amino acids (p < 0.05), including amino acids with ketogenic and glucogenic properties as well as aromatic amino acids. Following cholecalciferol supplementation, increases were observed in glutamine (p < 0.001) and histidine levels (p < 0.05), with several other amino acids remaining unaffected. Glucose (p < 0.05) and acetate (p < 0.05) decreased after 24 weeks in the group taking the supplement, and changes in the saturation of fatty acids (p < 0.05) were also observed, suggesting a role of liposoluble vitamin D in lipid metabolism. Long-term cholecalciferol supplementation in chronically obese and overweight hypertensives induced changes in the blood serum metabolome, which reflected systemic metabolism and may have fostered a new microenvironment for cell proliferation and biology. Of note, the increased availability of glutamine may be relevant for the proliferation of different T-cell subsets. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Recent Molecular Developments in Obesity)
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