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Research Progress of Biodegradable Materials

A special issue of International Journal of Molecular Sciences (ISSN 1422-0067). This special issue belongs to the section "Materials Science".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 September 2024 | Viewed by 5628

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Department of Chemical Sciences, University of Naples “Federico II”, 80126 Naples, Italy
Interests: biodegradable materials; bioplastics, nutrition biochemistry
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Chemical Sciences, University of Naples “Federico II”, 80126 Naples, Italy
Interests: biotechnological applications of microorganisms; fermentative production of biomolecules; raw sources as substrates for microbial growth

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues, 

Nowadays, new eco-friendly materials draw increasing interest due to the increased global awareness of environmental protection. In this regard, biodegradable materials that can be broken down by bacteria, fungi, or other biological processes are considered environmentally friendly products for their ability to decompose back into natural elements. These materials can further play a significant role in lowering environmental pollution when they are properly modified to acquire controllable degradation properties.

We invite investigators to contribute original research articles, as well as review articles, on research advances of the manufacture of novel biodegradable materials including but not limited to (1) the definition of different types of biodegradable materials; (2) the features of environmentally friendly and biodegradable material for use in daily life and industrial manufacturing; (3) how to address the market's demand for biodegradable materials in terms of cost and performance; (4) technologies for the manufacture of biodegradable materials with tailored functions; (5) different applications of biodegradable materials.

Dr. Concetta Valeria Lucia Giosafatto
Dr. Loredana Mariniello
Dr. Odile Francesca Restaino
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Molecular Sciences is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. There is an Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal. For details about the APC please see here. Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • biodegradability
  • controlled biodegradability
  • bioplastics
  • renewable resources
  • environmental pollution
  • environmentally friendly materials

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

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23 pages, 4402 KiB  
Article
Toward the Improvement of Maleic Anhydride Functionalization in Polyhydroxybutyrate (PHB): Effect of Styrene Monomer and Sn(Oct)2 Catalyst
by Matheus Ferreira de Souza, Carlos Bruno Barreto Luna, Danilo Diniz Siqueira, Ewerton de Oliveira Teotônio Bezerra, Grazielle Rozendo de Cerqueira, Edcleide Maria Araújo and Renate Maria Ramos Wellen
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2023, 24(19), 14409; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms241914409 - 22 Sep 2023
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 941
Abstract
In this work, polyhydroxybutyrate (PHB) was maleic anhydride (MA)-grafted in the molten state, using dicumyl peroxide (DCP) as a reaction initiator. Tin(II) 2-ethylhexanoate (Sn(Oct)2) and styrene monomer (St.) were used to maximize the maleic anhydride grafting degree. When PHB was modified [...] Read more.
In this work, polyhydroxybutyrate (PHB) was maleic anhydride (MA)-grafted in the molten state, using dicumyl peroxide (DCP) as a reaction initiator. Tin(II) 2-ethylhexanoate (Sn(Oct)2) and styrene monomer (St.) were used to maximize the maleic anhydride grafting degree. When PHB was modified with MA/DCP and MA/DCP/Sn(Oct)2, viscosity was reduced, suggesting chain scission in relation to pure PHB. However, when the styrene monomer was added, the viscosity increased due to multiple grafts of MA and styrene into the PHB chain. In addition, the FTIR showed the formation of a new band at 1780 cm−1 and 704 cm−1, suggesting a multiphase copolymer PHB-g-(St-co-MA). The PHB (MA/DCP) system showed a grafting degree of 0.23%; however, the value increased to 0.39% with incorporating Sn(Oct)2. The highest grafting efficiency was for the PHB (MA/DCP/St.) system with a value of 0.91%, while the PHB (MA/DCP/St./Sn(Oct)2) hybrid mixture was reduced to 0.73%. The chemical modification process of PHB with maleic anhydride increased the thermal stability by about 20 °C compared with pure PHB. The incorporation of 0.5 phr of the Sn(Oct)2 catalyst increased the efficiency of the grafting degree in the PHB. However, the St./Sn(Oct)2 hybrid mixture caused a deleterious effect on the maleic anhydride grafting degree. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Research Progress of Biodegradable Materials)
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16 pages, 4077 KiB  
Article
Physicochemical Characterization of Chitosan/Poly-γ-Glutamic Acid Glass-like Materials
by Sondos Hejazi, Odile Francesca Restaino, Mohammed Sabbah, Domenico Zannini, Rocco Di Girolamo, Angela Marotta, Sergio D’Ambrosio, Irene Russo Krauss, C. Valeria L. Giosafatto, Gabriella Santagata, Chiara Schiraldi and Raffaele Porta
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2023, 24(15), 12495; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms241512495 - 06 Aug 2023
Viewed by 1619
Abstract
This paper sets up a new route for producing non-covalently crosslinked bio-composites by blending poly-γ-glutamic acid (γ-PGA) of microbial origin and chitosan (CH) through poly-electrolyte complexation under specific experimental conditions. CH and two different molecular weight γ-PGA fractions have been blended at different [...] Read more.
This paper sets up a new route for producing non-covalently crosslinked bio-composites by blending poly-γ-glutamic acid (γ-PGA) of microbial origin and chitosan (CH) through poly-electrolyte complexation under specific experimental conditions. CH and two different molecular weight γ-PGA fractions have been blended at different mass ratios (1/9, 2/8 and 3/7) under acidic pH. The developed materials seemed to behave like moldable hydrogels with a soft rubbery consistency. However, after dehydration, they became exceedingly hard, glass-like materials completely insoluble in water and organic solvents. The native biopolymers and their blends underwent comprehensive structural, physicochemical, and thermal analyses. The study confirmed strong physical interactions between polysaccharide and polyamide chains, facilitated by electrostatic attraction and hydrogen bonding. The materials exhibited both crystalline and amorphous structures and demonstrated good thermal stability and degradability. Described as thermoplastic and saloplastic, these bio-composites offer vast opportunities in the realm of polyelectrolyte complexes (PECs). This unique combination of properties allowed the bio-composites to function as glass-like materials, making them highly versatile for potential applications in various fields. They hold potential for use in regenerative medicine, biomedical devices, food packaging, and 3D printing. Their environmentally friendly properties make them attractive candidates for sustainable material development in various industries. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Research Progress of Biodegradable Materials)
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Review

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26 pages, 13813 KiB  
Review
Poly(Propylene Carbonate)-Based Biodegradable and Environment-Friendly Materials for Biomedical Applications
by Li Wang, Yumin Li, Jingde Yang, Qianqian Wu, Song Liang and Zhenning Liu
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2024, 25(5), 2938; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms25052938 - 02 Mar 2024
Viewed by 967
Abstract
Poly(propylene carbonate) (PPC) is an emerging “carbon fixation” polymer that holds the potential to become a “biomaterial of choice” in healthcare owing to its good biocompatibility, tunable biodegradability and safe degradation products. However, the commercialization and wide application of PPC as a biomedical [...] Read more.
Poly(propylene carbonate) (PPC) is an emerging “carbon fixation” polymer that holds the potential to become a “biomaterial of choice” in healthcare owing to its good biocompatibility, tunable biodegradability and safe degradation products. However, the commercialization and wide application of PPC as a biomedical material are still hindered by its narrow processing temperature range, poor mechanical properties and hydrophobic nature. Over recent decades, several physical, chemical and biological modifications of PPC have been achieved by introducing biocompatible polymers, inorganic ions or small molecules, which can endow PPC with better cytocompatibility and desirable biodegradability, and thus enable various applications. Indeed, a variety of PPC-based degradable materials have been used in medical applications including medical masks, surgical gowns, drug carriers, wound dressings, implants and scaffolds. In this review, the molecular structure, catalysts for synthesis, properties and modifications of PPC are discussed. Recent biomedical applications of PPC-based biomaterials are highlighted and summarized. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Research Progress of Biodegradable Materials)
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18 pages, 1580 KiB  
Review
Biodegradable Polymers in Biomedical Applications: A Review—Developments, Perspectives and Future Challenges
by Jagoda Kurowiak, Tomasz Klekiel and Romuald Będziński
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2023, 24(23), 16952; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms242316952 - 29 Nov 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1614
Abstract
Biodegradable polymers are materials that, thanks to their remarkable properties, are widely understood to be suitable for use in scientific fields such as tissue engineering and materials engineering. Due to the alarming increase in the number of diagnosed diseases and conditions, polymers are [...] Read more.
Biodegradable polymers are materials that, thanks to their remarkable properties, are widely understood to be suitable for use in scientific fields such as tissue engineering and materials engineering. Due to the alarming increase in the number of diagnosed diseases and conditions, polymers are of great interest in biomedical applications especially. The use of biodegradable polymers in biomedicine is constantly expanding. The application of new techniques or the improvement of existing ones makes it possible to produce materials with desired properties, such as mechanical strength, controlled degradation time and rate and antibacterial and antimicrobial properties. In addition, these materials can take virtually unlimited shapes as a result of appropriate design. This is additionally desirable when it is necessary to develop new structures that support or restore the proper functioning of systems in the body. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Research Progress of Biodegradable Materials)
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