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Animal Experimental Models in Bone Metabolic Disease 2.0

A special issue of International Journal of Molecular Sciences (ISSN 1422-0067). This special issue belongs to the section "Molecular Endocrinology and Metabolism".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 April 2024) | Viewed by 1153

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Departments of Internal Medicine and Toxicology, University Hospital Rio Hortega, University of Valladolid, Valladolid, Spain
Interests: osteoporosis; genetics and relationship with chronic disease
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
School of Medicine, University of Valladolid, 47002 Valladolid, Spain
Interests: molecular genetics; molecular medicine; genetic biomarkers; chronic diseases
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

It is our pleasure to inform you of a Special Issue of IJMS entitled “Animal Experimental Models in Bone Metabolic Disease 2.0”. Metabolic bone disease, especially osteoporosis, has a high prevalence and causes an increase in morbidity and mortality, especially in elderly patients. It is important to understand the molecular mechanisms involved in its appearance, which allow for therapeutic targets to be established. An increased knowledge of its pathophysiology allows for a better understanding of the disease and its solutions. On the other hand, knowledge of these new therapeutic targets will allow for the design of new therapeutic options. These need to be tested in experimental models before they can be tested in humans. In addition, the therapeutic options approved for other diseases could be beneficial in metabolic bone disease and tests on animal models would facilitate their use. This Special Issue focuses on animal experimental models used to study the pathogenesis of bone metabolic diseases, and will be published in International Journal of Molecular Sciences (IJMS, https://www.mdpi.com/journal/ijms, ISSN 1422-0067). We invite researchers to submit original review articles associated with the use of animal experimental models in metabolic bone diseases.

Prof. Dr. Jose Luis Pérez-Castrillón
Dr. Ricardo Usategui-Martín
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Keywords

  • animal experimental models
  • therapeutic targets
  • pathophysiology
  • bone metabolic disease

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

21 pages, 4771 KiB  
Article
Methodology and Characterization of a 3D Bone Organoid Model Derived from Murine Cells
by Jaymes Fuller, Katherine Sares Lefferts, Pooja Shah and Jessica A. Cottrell
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2024, 25(8), 4225; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms25084225 - 11 Apr 2024
Viewed by 677
Abstract
Here, we report on the development of a cost-effective, well-characterized three-dimensional (3D) model of bone homeostasis derived from commonly available stocks of immortalized murine cell lines and laboratory reagents. This 3D murine-cell-derived bone organoid model (3D-mcBOM) is adaptable to a range of contexts [...] Read more.
Here, we report on the development of a cost-effective, well-characterized three-dimensional (3D) model of bone homeostasis derived from commonly available stocks of immortalized murine cell lines and laboratory reagents. This 3D murine-cell-derived bone organoid model (3D-mcBOM) is adaptable to a range of contexts and can be used in conjunction with surrogates of osteoblast and osteoclast function to study cellular and molecular mechanisms that affect bone homeostasis in vitro or to augment in vivo models of physiology or disease. The 3D-mcBOM was established using a pre-osteoblast murine cell line, which was seeded into a hydrogel extracellular matrix (ECM) and differentiated into functional osteoblasts (OBs). The OBs mineralized the hydrogel ECM, leading to the deposition and consolidation of hydroxyapatite into bone-like organoids. Fourier-transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy confirmed that the mineralized matrix formed in the 3D-mcBOM was bone. The histological staining of 3D-mcBOM samples indicated a consistent rate of ECM mineralization. Type I collagen C-telopeptide (CTX1) analysis was used to evaluate the dynamics of OC differentiation and activity. Reliable 3D models of bone formation and homeostasis align with current ethical trends to reduce the use of animal models. This functional model of bone homeostasis provides a cost-effective model system using immortalized cell lines and easily procured supplemental compounds, which can be assessed by measuring surrogates of OB and OC function to study the effects of various stimuli in future experimental evaluations of bone homeostasis. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Animal Experimental Models in Bone Metabolic Disease 2.0)
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