ijms-logo

Journal Browser

Journal Browser

Nanoparticle-Based Drug Targeting

A special issue of International Journal of Molecular Sciences (ISSN 1422-0067). This special issue belongs to the section "Materials Science".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 April 2024) | Viewed by 1565

Special Issue Editor

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

During the last few decades, organic or inorganic nanoparticles have been extensively investigated in the field of biomedical engineering for drug targeting issues. Since nanoparticles have extremely small dimensions and huge surfaces, they are spotlighted in drug targeting issues, i.e., nanoparticles are able to target specific cells or tissues and, therefore, can be considered as a promising candidate to treat incurable diseases such as cancer, neurodegenerative disease and severe inflammation. Due to their huge surfaces, their surface can be decorated with various molecules for targeting specific receptors of diseased cells. Various strategies have been attempted to maximize drug targeting against diseased cells using monoclonal antibody–drug/nanomaterial conjugates, vitamin or peptides, enzymes, saccharide/polysaccharide–drug conjugates, stimuli-sensitive biopolymers, etc. Various materials such as inorganic molecules, polymers, proteins, polysaccharides, carbon-based nanomaterials and liposomes have been developed to fabricate nanoparticles and to achieve drug targeting purposes.

Dr. Young-IL Jeong
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Molecular Sciences is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. There is an Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal. For details about the APC please see here. Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • nanoparticles
  • drug targeting
  • stimuli-sensitive drug delivery
  • controlled release of bioactive molecules
  • theranostic application
  • nano-vaccine

Published Papers (1 paper)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Review

19 pages, 1480 KiB  
Review
Nanoparticle-Based Immunotherapy for Reversing T-Cell Exhaustion
by Fei Li, Yahong Wang, Dandan Chen and Yunjie Du
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2024, 25(3), 1396; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms25031396 - 23 Jan 2024
Viewed by 1387
Abstract
T-cell exhaustion refers to a state of T-cell dysfunction commonly observed in chronic infections and cancer. Immune checkpoint molecules blockading using PD-1 and TIM-3 antibodies have shown promising results in reversing exhaustion, but this approach has several limitations. The treatment of T-cell exhaustion [...] Read more.
T-cell exhaustion refers to a state of T-cell dysfunction commonly observed in chronic infections and cancer. Immune checkpoint molecules blockading using PD-1 and TIM-3 antibodies have shown promising results in reversing exhaustion, but this approach has several limitations. The treatment of T-cell exhaustion is still facing great challenges, making it imperative to explore new therapeutic strategies. With the development of nanotechnology, nanoparticles have successfully been applied as drug carriers and delivery systems in the treatment of cancer and infectious diseases. Furthermore, nanoparticle-based immunotherapy has emerged as a crucial approach to reverse exhaustion. Here, we have compiled the latest advances in T-cell exhaustion, with a particular focus on the characteristics of exhaustion that can be targeted. Additionally, the emerging nanoparticle-based delivery systems were also reviewed. Moreover, we have discussed, in detail, nanoparticle-based immunotherapies that aim to reverse exhaustion, including targeting immune checkpoint blockades, remodeling the tumor microenvironment, and targeting the metabolism of exhausted T cells, etc. These data could aid in comprehending the immunopathogenesis of exhaustion and accomplishing the objective of preventing and treating chronic diseases or cancer. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nanoparticle-Based Drug Targeting)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Back to TopTop