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Insights into the Mechanisms and Driving Forces of Biomolecular Adsorption Processes

A special issue of International Journal of Molecular Sciences (ISSN 1422-0067). This special issue belongs to the section "Molecular Biophysics".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 April 2024) | Viewed by 1454

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
1. CICS-UBI Health Sciences Research Center, University Beira Interior, Avenida Infante D. Henrique, 6200-506 Covilhã, Portugal
2. Department of Chemistry, University Beira Interior, Avenida Infante D. Henrique, 6200-506 Covilhã, Portugal
Interests: biophysics and physical chemistry; colloidal phenomena and surface chemistry studies; downstream processing; biomolecular adsorption processes; biosensing

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Guest Editor
Chair of Bioseparation Engineering, School of Engineering and Design, Technical University of Munich, Boltzmannstraße 15, 85748 Garching, Germany
Interests: colloidal chemistry; bio–nano interactions; solid–liquid interfaces; mass transfer; magnetic separation; bionanotechnology; electrosorption; material characterization; microalgae harvesting

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Biomolecular adsorption, a critical process where biomolecules interact and bind to surfaces forming an adsorbed layer, holds significant importance across various scientific fields, especially within the biopharmaceuticals industry. Therefore, understanding the underlying mechanisms and driving forces during biomolecule adsorption processes is essential. Researchers can leverage this knowledge to enhance purification procedures, improve yields and productivity in downstream processing, ensure product stability, design efficient drug delivery systems, and maintain material biocompatibility. By exerting control over Biomolecular Adsorption Processes through the understanding of their driving forces and the mechanisms behind solid–liquid partitioning, researchers gain the capacity to optimize and regulate processes effectively. However, this knowledge is still in its infancy.

The present Special Issue, entitled "Insights into the Mechanisms and Driving Forces of Biomolecular Adsorption Processes", aims to showcase research advancements to the extensive community engaged in this domain. We welcome contributions at the intersection of physics, chemistry, biology, and/or materials science.

Dr. Ana Cristina Dias-Cabral
Dr. Paula Fraga-García
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Molecular Sciences is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. There is an Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal. For details about the APC please see here. Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • biomolecule adsorption
  • biomolecule separation
  • interaction mechanisms
  • driving forces
  • biophysical studies
  • interaction thermodynamics
  • downstream processing
  • materials and surface science
  • interfacial chemistry

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

30 pages, 6524 KiB  
Article
Sorption Behavior of Azo Dye Congo Red onto Activated Biochar from Haematoxylum campechianum Waste: Gradient Boosting Machine Learning-Assisted Bayesian Optimization for Improved Adsorption Process
by Diego Melchor Polanco Gamboa, Mohamed Abatal, Eder Lima, Francisco Anguebes Franseschi, Claudia Aguilar Ucán, Rasikh Tariq, Miguel Angel Ramírez Elías and Joel Vargas
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2024, 25(9), 4771; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms25094771 - 27 Apr 2024
Viewed by 434
Abstract
This work aimed to describe the adsorption behavior of Congo red (CR) onto activated biochar material prepared from Haematoxylum campechianum waste (ABHC). The carbon precursor was soaked with phosphoric acid, followed by pyrolysis to convert the precursor into activated biochar. The [...] Read more.
This work aimed to describe the adsorption behavior of Congo red (CR) onto activated biochar material prepared from Haematoxylum campechianum waste (ABHC). The carbon precursor was soaked with phosphoric acid, followed by pyrolysis to convert the precursor into activated biochar. The surface morphology of the adsorbent (before and after dye adsorption) was characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM/EDS), BET method, X-ray powder diffraction (XRD), and Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and, lastly, pHpzc was also determined. Batch studies were carried out in the following intervals of pH = 4–10, temperature = 300.15–330.15 K, the dose of adsorbent = 1–10 g/L, and isotherms evaluated the adsorption process to determine the maximum adsorption capacity (Qmax, mg/g). Kinetic studies were performed starting from two different initial concentrations (25 and 50 mg/L) and at a maximum contact time of 48 h. The reusability potential of activated biochar was evaluated by adsorption–desorption cycles. The maximum adsorption capacity obtained with the Langmuir adsorption isotherm model was 114.8 mg/g at 300.15 K, pH = 5.4, and a dose of activated biochar of 1.0 g/L. This study also highlights the application of advanced machine learning techniques to optimize a chemical removal process. Leveraging a comprehensive dataset, a Gradient Boosting regression model was developed and fine-tuned using Bayesian optimization within a Python programming environment. The optimization algorithm efficiently navigated the input space to maximize the removal percentage, resulting in a predicted efficiency of approximately 90.47% under optimal conditions. These findings offer promising insights for enhancing efficiency in similar removal processes, showcasing the potential of machine learning in process optimization and environmental remediation. Full article
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16 pages, 2176 KiB  
Article
Comprehensive Evaluation of Polyaniline-Doped Lignosulfonate in Adsorbing Dye and Heavy Metal Ions
by Wenjuan Wu, Penghui Li, Mingkang Wang, Huijun Liu, Xiufu Zhao, Caiwen Wu and Jianpeng Ren
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2024, 25(1), 133; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms25010133 - 21 Dec 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 702
Abstract
Lignosulfonate/polyaniline (LS/PANI) nanocomposite adsorbent materials were prepared by the chemical polymerization of lignosulfonate with an aniline monomer as a dopant and structure-directing agent, and the adsorption behavior of dyes as well as heavy metal ions was investigated. LS/PANI composites were used as dye [...] Read more.
Lignosulfonate/polyaniline (LS/PANI) nanocomposite adsorbent materials were prepared by the chemical polymerization of lignosulfonate with an aniline monomer as a dopant and structure-directing agent, and the adsorption behavior of dyes as well as heavy metal ions was investigated. LS/PANI composites were used as dye adsorbents for the removal of different cationic dyes (malachite green, methylene blue, and crystal violet). The adsorption behavior of LS/PANI composites as dye adsorbents for malachite green was investigated by examining the effects of the adsorbent dosage, solution pH, initial concentration of dye, adsorption time, and temperature on the adsorption properties of this dye. The following conclusions were obtained. The optimum adsorption conditions for the removal of malachite green dye when LS/PANI composites were used as malachite green dye adsorbents were as follows: an adsorbent dosage of 20 mg, an initial concentration of the dye of 250 mg/L, an adsorption time of 300 min, and a temperature of 358 K. The LS/PANI composite adsorbed malachite green dye in accordance with the Langmuir adsorption model and pseudo-second-order kinetic model, which belongs to chemisorption-based monomolecular adsorption, and the equilibrium adsorption amount was 245.75 mg/g. In particular, the adsorption of heavy metal ion Pb2+ was investigated, and the removal performance was also favorable for Pb2+. Full article
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