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Interactions of Cells with Biomaterials for Regenerative Medicine 4.0

A special issue of International Journal of Molecular Sciences (ISSN 1422-0067). This special issue belongs to the section "Materials Science".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 August 2024 | Viewed by 1942

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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The biomaterials used for regenerative medicine applications should be non-toxic and biocompatible. Biocompatibility has a very broad meaning, including the non-toxicity of the materials; their ability to support cell adhesion, proliferation, and differentiation; as well as their non-immunogenic properties. Therefore, the evaluation of major cell–biomaterial interactions is a key factor in determining the biocompatibility and clinical usefulness of new biomaterials. It is important to know that in vitro tests can effectively replace animal models in the preliminary evaluation of the following: 1) cytotoxicity; 2) cell adhesion, spreading, and proliferation on a biomaterial; 3) cell differentiation; and 4) immune response to a biomaterial. Despite the possibility of the use of in vitro cellular models for the evaluation of materials’ biocompatibility, researchers still preferentially choose in vivo animal tests for this purpose. Nevertheless, the use of animal models at a preliminary stage or for comparative purposes is against the principles of the ‘3Rs’, aiming to replace, reduce, and refine the use of animals wherever possible.

The main goal of this Special Issue is to highlight the recent progress made in molecular biology and biotechnological techniques that allow a better exploitation of the potential of in vitro cellular models for the biocompatibility testing of novel biomaterials, suggesting molecular mechanisms of cell adhesion, proliferation, and biomaterial-induced activation of immune cells. All papers (reviews and original research articles) that deal with the in vitro and ex vivo determination of cell–biomaterial interactions are welcome. Manuscripts that present interactions of biomaterials with prokaryotic cells (e.g., antibiofilms or the antibacterial activity of a material) are also encouraged; however, some description of at least basic cytotoxicity tests with eukaryotic cells should be included.

Prof. Dr. Agata Przekora-Kuśmierz
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Molecular Sciences is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

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Keywords

  • biomaterials
  • bioceramics
  • biopolymers
  • tissue engineering
  • bone scaffolds
  • wound dressings
  • skin substitutes
  • stem cells
  • cell culture models
  • cell-biomaterial interactions

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Published Papers (2 papers)

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27 pages, 57792 KiB  
Article
Titanium-Doped Diamond-like Carbon Layers as a Promising Coating for Joint Replacements Supporting Osteogenic Differentiation of Mesenchymal Stem Cells
by Martina Travnickova, Elena Filova, Petr Slepicka, Nikola Slepickova Kasalkova, Tomas Kocourek, Margit Zaloudkova, Tomas Suchy and Lucie Bacakova
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2024, 25(5), 2837; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms25052837 - 29 Feb 2024
Viewed by 705
Abstract
Diamond-like carbon (DLC) layers are known for their high corrosion and wear resistance, low friction, and high biocompatibility. However, it is often necessary to dope DLC layers with additional chemical elements to strengthen their adhesion to the substrate. Ti-DLC layers (doped with 0.4, [...] Read more.
Diamond-like carbon (DLC) layers are known for their high corrosion and wear resistance, low friction, and high biocompatibility. However, it is often necessary to dope DLC layers with additional chemical elements to strengthen their adhesion to the substrate. Ti-DLC layers (doped with 0.4, 2.1, 3.7, 6.6, and 12.8 at.% of Ti) were prepared by dual pulsed laser deposition, and pure DLC, glass, and polystyrene (PS) were used as controls. In vitro cell–material interactions were investigated with an emphasis on cell adhesion, proliferation, and osteogenic differentiation. We observed slightly increasing roughness and contact angle and decreasing surface free energy on Ti-DLC layers with increasing Ti content. Three-week biological experiments were performed using adipose tissue-derived stem cells (ADSCs) and bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (bmMSCs) in vitro. The cell proliferation activity was similar or slightly higher on the Ti-doped materials than on glass and PS. Osteogenic cell differentiation on all materials was proved by collagen and osteocalcin production, ALP activity, and Ca deposition. The bmMSCs exhibited greater initial proliferation potential and an earlier onset of osteogenic differentiation than the ADSCs. The ADSCs showed a slightly higher formation of focal adhesions, higher metabolic activity, and Ca deposition with increasing Ti content. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Interactions of Cells with Biomaterials for Regenerative Medicine 4.0)
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17 pages, 5081 KiB  
Article
Gypsum-Related Impact on Antibiotic-Loaded Composite Based on Highly Porous Hydroxyapatite—Advantages and Disadvantages
by Justyna Zalewska, Vladyslav Vivcharenko and Anna Belcarz
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2023, 24(24), 17178; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms242417178 - 6 Dec 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 913
Abstract
Highly porous hydroxyapatite is sometimes considered toxic and useless as a biomaterial for bone tissue regeneration because of the high adsorption of calcium and phosphate ions from cell culture media. This negatively affects the osteoblast’s growth in such ion-deprived media and suggests “false [...] Read more.
Highly porous hydroxyapatite is sometimes considered toxic and useless as a biomaterial for bone tissue regeneration because of the high adsorption of calcium and phosphate ions from cell culture media. This negatively affects the osteoblast’s growth in such ion-deprived media and suggests “false cytotoxicity” of tested hydroxyapatite. In our recent study, we showed that a small addition of calcium sulfate dihydrate (CSD) may compensate for this adsorption without a negative effect on other properties of hydroxyapatite-based biomaterials. This study was designed to verify whether such CSD-supplemented biomaterials may serve as antibiotic carriers. FTIR, roughness, mechanical strength analysis, drug release, hemocompatibility, cytotoxicity against human osteoblasts, and antibacterial activity were evaluated to characterize tested biomaterials. The results showed that the addition of 1.75% gypsum and gentamicin caused short-term calcium ion compensation in media incubated with the composite. The combination of both additives also increased antibacterial activity against bacteria representative of bone infections without affecting osteoblast proliferation, hemocompatibility, and mechanical parameters. Thus, gypsum and antibiotic supplementation may provide advanced functionality for bone-regeneration materials based on hydroxyapatite of a high surface area and increasingly high Ca2+ sorption capacity. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Interactions of Cells with Biomaterials for Regenerative Medicine 4.0)
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