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Mechanisms and Effects of Toxic Chemical Elements and Their Harmful Compounds on Metabolism, Endocrine and Nervous Systems of Humans

A special issue of International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health (ISSN 1660-4601). This special issue belongs to the section "Toxicology and Public Health".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 September 2021) | Viewed by 5436

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Department of Analytical Chemistry, Medical University of Lublin, 20-093 Lublin, Poland
Interests: bioanalytics; pathobiochemistry; environmental and food chemistry; diets; trace elements; heavy metals; toxicity; selenium and iodine in autism; spectrum disorders; obesity; thyroid pathologies; clinical samples; medical applications of modern instrumental techniques; validation studies
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

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Guest Editor
Chair and Department of Human Physiology, Medical University of Lublin, 20-080 Lublin, Poland
Interests: diabetes mellitus; obesity; polycystic ovarian syndrome;, thyroid disorders; thyroid cancer; hyperthyroidism; hypothyroidism; parathyroid and calcium disorders; pituitary disorders; health effects of toxic chemical elements
Department of Correct Anatomy, Medical University of Lublin, 20-090 Lublin, Poland
Interests: fatty liver disease; liver diseases; cholecystectomy; micronutrients; macronutrients
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Homeostasis, a complex process of the regulation of all the functions in the human body, maintains the internal bodily environment. However, any level of deviation from the normal structural state (i.e., chemical imbalance) may (and often does) result in the development of the disease. Therefore, scientists from a wide variety of research fields determine bodily deficiencies of chemical elements, their toxicity, and exposure potential, which are accountable for the development of specific diseases in humans. Scientific reports concerning this matter do not often give the big picture of the mechanisms and causes responsible for the occurrence or exacerbation of a certain disease’s symptoms and signs.

Research into the content and function of various toxic and potentially toxic chemical elements and their compounds has long been conducted, and along with the technological development it has been able to provide extensive knowledge in this field. Yet, since the observation of the changing elemental content, distribution, bioavailability, and interactions between the essential/nonessential and toxic elements in the human body is not an easy task, current knowledge, though extensive, is still insufficient to explain the etiology of certain diseases. What is more, the self-regulation mechanisms in disease may be disturbed by diet, stress, lifestyle factors, and the body’s specific susceptibility to a certain disease. Therefore, single and multi-elemental or multi-compound analyses should be interpreted in a broader and more complex context.

This Special Issue aims to present research articles as well as critical reviews that address challenges to see and understand the role of specific toxic and potentially toxic chemical elements and their harmful compounds in the development of diseases in humans. Hopefully, this will shed more light on various roles that chemical elements play in humans, and help us to better understand the human body’s susceptibility to certain disorders, especially those of the metabolic nature of the endocrine and nervous systems.

Best regards,

Dr. Anna Błażewicz
Dr. Katarzyna Ewa Skórzyńska-Dziduszko
Dr. Jacek Baj
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2500 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • toxic elements
  • toxic compounds
  • toxic effects on metabolism
  • nervous system
  • endocrine system
  • health risk assessment
  • chemical interactions in the human body

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

11 pages, 355 KiB  
Article
Hair Lead, Aluminum, and Other Toxic Metals in Normal-Weight and Obese Patients with Coronary Heart Disease
by Anatoly V. Skalny, Philippe Yu Kopylov, Monica M. B. Paoliello, Jung-Su Chang, Michael Aschner, Igor P. Bobrovnitsky, Jane C.-J. Chao, Jan Aaseth, Sergei N. Chebotarev and Alexey A. Tinkov
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(15), 8195; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18158195 - 03 Aug 2021
Cited by 6 | Viewed by 2482
Abstract
The objective of the present study was to evaluate hair toxic metal levels in patients with obesity and/or coronary heart disease (CHD). Following a 2 × 2 factorial design, subjects without CHD were grouped into normal weight control (n = 123) and [...] Read more.
The objective of the present study was to evaluate hair toxic metal levels in patients with obesity and/or coronary heart disease (CHD). Following a 2 × 2 factorial design, subjects without CHD were grouped into normal weight control (n = 123) and obese groups (n = 140). Patients suffering from CHD were divided into normal weight (n = 180) and obese CHD subjects (n = 240). Hair Al, As, Cd, Hg, Ni, and Pb levels were evaluated using inductively-coupled plasma mass-spectrometry. The data demonstrate that hair Al and Hg levels were higher in obese subjects as compared to normal weight controls. Normal weight CHD patients were characterized by significantly higher hair Al, As, Cd, and Pb levels when compared to healthy subjects. The highest hair Al, As, and Pb levels were observed in obese CHD patients, significantly exceeding the respective values in other groups. Factorial analysis revealed significant influence of factorial interaction (CHD*obesity) only for hair Pb content. Given the role of obesity as a risk factor for CHD, it is proposed that increased toxic metal accumulation in obesity may promote further development of cardiovascular diseases. Full article
9 pages, 525 KiB  
Article
Serum Concentration of Fluoride in Patients with Alcoholic Liver Cirrhosis from the Lublin Region in Eastern Poland
by Andrzej Prystupa, Jarosław Sak, Paweł Kiciński, Agnieszka Stenzel-Bembenek and Anna Błażewicz
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(3), 1115; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18031115 - 27 Jan 2021
Cited by 5 | Viewed by 2199
Abstract
In view of previous reports, it is important to determine the relationship between liver function and the level of fluoride in the serum. The aim of this study was to investigate serum concentrations of fluoride in 72 patients with alcoholic liver cirrhosis, living [...] Read more.
In view of previous reports, it is important to determine the relationship between liver function and the level of fluoride in the serum. The aim of this study was to investigate serum concentrations of fluoride in 72 patients with alcoholic liver cirrhosis, living in the region of Lublin (Eastern Poland) divided based on the severity of disease according to the Child-Turcotte-Pugh criteria. Higher plasma fluoride concentrations were associated with changes in liver related parameters. In all groups of analyzed patients with different stages of alcoholic liver cirrhosis, elevated levels of plasma fluoride and increased activities of both alanine aminotransferase (ALT) and total bilirubin concentration were shown. Full article
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