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Sex Differences in Physiologic Responses and Long-Term Adaptations to Exercise

A special issue of International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health (ISSN 1660-4601). This special issue belongs to the section "Exercise and Health-Related Quality of Life".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 January 2025 | Viewed by 2115

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Department of Physical Education, University of Cadiz, Puerto Real 11519, Spain
Interests: exercise physiology and nutrition; health education; diabetes

E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Physical Education, University of Cadiz, Puerto Real 11519, Spain
Interests: exercise physiology; hypertension; diabetes and metabolic syndrome

Special Issue Information

Physiological responses and adaptations to exercise may not only improve sports performance, but also health status. Thus, exercise is recognized as a potent therapy for the prevention and treatment of chronic disease in adults. However, there is a significant gender bias in research. Thus, this Special Issue was introduced to further investigate sex differences in physiological responses to exercise and long-term adaptations to training in healthy adults or in patients with a chronic disease.

Relevant topics may include sex differences, as well as differences caused by fluctuation in ovarian hormone levels, menopause, and throughout the female lifespan in relevant outcomes such as metabolism during exercise, physical fitness, cardiovascular risk, hormonal responses, inflammation, oxidative stress, and exosomes. Other topics may be considered, so please email cristina.casals@gm.uca.es with any queries. Manuscripts may include data-based research papers, reviews, meta-analyses, case studies, methodological papers, brief reports, commentaries, or position papers.

Dr. Cristina Casals
Dr. Miguel Ramirez-Jimenez
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2500 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • gender
  • sexual dimorphism
  • menopause
  • training
  • physical activity
  • physical fitness

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

12 pages, 398 KiB  
Article
Sex-Specific Relationships of Physical Activity and Sedentary Behaviour with Oxidative Stress and Inflammatory Markers in Young Adults
by Juan Corral-Pérez, Martin Alcala, Daniel Velázquez-Díaz, Alejandro Perez-Bey, María Á. Vázquez-Sánchez, Maria Calderon-Dominguez, Cristina Casals and Jesús G. Ponce-González
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2023, 20(2), 899; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph20020899 - 4 Jan 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1662
Abstract
This study aims to analyse sex-specific associations of physical activity and sedentary behaviour with oxidative stress and inflammatory markers in a young-adult population. Sixty participants (21 women, 22.63 ± 4.62 years old) wore a hip accelerometer for 7 consecutive days to estimate their [...] Read more.
This study aims to analyse sex-specific associations of physical activity and sedentary behaviour with oxidative stress and inflammatory markers in a young-adult population. Sixty participants (21 women, 22.63 ± 4.62 years old) wore a hip accelerometer for 7 consecutive days to estimate their physical activity and sedentarism. Oxidative stress (catalase, superoxide dismutase, glutathione peroxidase, glutathione, malondialdehyde, and advanced oxidation protein products) and inflammatory (tumour necrosis factor-alpha and interleukin-6) markers were measured. Student t-tests and single linear regressions were applied. The women presented higher catalase activity and glutathione concentrations, and lower levels of advanced protein-oxidation products, tumour necrosis factor-alpha, and interleukin-6 than the men (p < 0.05). In the men, longer sedentary time was associated with lower catalase activity (β = −0.315, p = 0.04), and longer sedentary breaks and higher physical-activity expenditures were associated with malondialdehyde (β = −0.308, p = 0.04). Vigorous physical activity was related to inflammatory markers in the women (tumour necrosis factor-alpha, β = 0.437, p = 0.02) and men (interleukin−6, β = 0.528, p < 0.01). In conclusion, the women presented a better redox and inflammatory status than the men; however, oxidative-stress markers were associated with physical activity and sedentary behaviours only in the men. In light of this, women could have better protection against the deleterious effect of sedentarism but a worse adaptation to daily physical activity. Full article
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