ijerph-logo

Journal Browser

Journal Browser

Cancer as a Public Health Problem--Prevention of Cancer

A special issue of International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health (ISSN 1660-4601). This special issue belongs to the section "Global Health".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 October 2021) | Viewed by 18123

Special Issue Editors


E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Faculty of Physiotherapy, Wroclaw University of Health and Sport Sciences, 35 Paderewskiego Street, 51-612 Wrocław, Poland
Interests: cancer rehabilitation; cancer prevention; physical activity; physical exercise; lymphedema
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

E-Mail Website
Assistant Guest Editor
Department of Rehabilitation, Greater Poland Cancer Centre, 61-866 Poznan, Poland
Interests: cancer rehabilitation; physical exercise; neurorehabilitation; biomechanics; quality of life
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

E-Mail Website
Assistant Guest Editor
Faculty of Physiotherapy, University School of Physical Education in Wroclaw, 51-612 Wrocław, Poland
Interests: breast cancer; multimodal physiotherapy; biomechanics; posture; physical activity; spine

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Cancer diseases are a matter of particular importance because of their health, psychological, and social consequences. They are one of the more severe health problems, as well as one of the leading causes of disability. The number of people living with a history of cancer incidence is estimated at 28 million worldwide. Epidemiologists predict that these numbers will double in the next 15 years. According to WHO, taking into account the epidemiological situation and the forecast for the next 10–20 years, cancer will become the main cause of death in the world of the twenty-first century.

The submission of papers exploring both primary and secondary prevention of cancer is encouraged.

Primary prevention: preventing cancer illness in healthy people. Secondary prevention: measures to reduce the physical and psychosocial consequences of the illness and prevention of relapse.

The listed keywords suggest just a few of the many possibilities.

Dr. Iwona Malicka
Dr. Katarzyna Hojan
Dr. Justyna Hanuszkiewicz
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2500 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Cancer
  • Physical activity
  • Exercise
  • Lifestyle
  • Prevention
  • Supportive care
  • Recovery
  • Quality of life

Published Papers (6 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Jump to: Review

12 pages, 936 KiB  
Article
The Influence of Nordic Walking on Isokinetic Trunk Muscle Endurance and Sagittal Spinal Curvatures in Women after Breast Cancer Treatment: Age-Specific Indicators
by Justyna Hanuszkiewicz, Marek Woźniewski and Iwona Malicka
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(5), 2409; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18052409 - 2 Mar 2021
Cited by 8 | Viewed by 2461
Abstract
Nordic walking (NW) is a popular form of rehabilitation. NW improves psychophysical condition in breast cancer (BC) survivors. This study aimed to analyze the effects of NW on functional and postural changes of the trunk in women of different ages after BC. We [...] Read more.
Nordic walking (NW) is a popular form of rehabilitation. NW improves psychophysical condition in breast cancer (BC) survivors. This study aimed to analyze the effects of NW on functional and postural changes of the trunk in women of different ages after BC. We hypothesized that an age relationship would be found. BC survivors (n = 39) were stratified by age as “middle- aged” (45–59 years) or “older” (60–75 years), then randomly allocated to the training intervention. A study group (SG, n = 19) participated in NW and a control group (CG, n = 20) performed general gymnastics. The sagittal spinal curvatures and isokinetic trunk muscle endurance were recorded at two time points, pre- and post-training intervention. Significant within NW group changes (p < 0.05) were found for the total work (TW) and average power (AP) of trunk flexors and extensors and the upper thoracic angle in middle-aged women. In older Nordic walkers, significant increases in TW and AP of the trunk flexor muscles were observed, with a negative increase in the trunk inclination angle. In CG, no significant functional or postural changes were observed in response to general gymnastics. NW improved both functional and postural changes in middle-aged women. This study identified the limitations of NW training in older women. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Cancer as a Public Health Problem--Prevention of Cancer)
Show Figures

Figure 1

14 pages, 6998 KiB  
Article
Challenges in the Prevention of Cervical Cancer in Romania
by Raluca Dania Todor, Gabriel Bratucu, Marius Alexandru Moga, Adina Nicoleta Candrea, Luigi Geo Marceanu and Costin Vlad Anastasiu
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(4), 1721; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18041721 - 10 Feb 2021
Cited by 16 | Viewed by 2917
Abstract
Approximately every two hours, a Romanian woman is diagnosed with cervical cancer as the country ranks first in the EU in terms of its mortality rate. This paper aims to identify the main reasons that have led to this situation. First, a study [...] Read more.
Approximately every two hours, a Romanian woman is diagnosed with cervical cancer as the country ranks first in the EU in terms of its mortality rate. This paper aims to identify the main reasons that have led to this situation. First, a study based on secondary data was conducted in order to identify measures taken by the Romanian Ministry of Health for the prevention of this type of cancer. Second, a quantitative study was conducted to evaluate the impact that exposure to information and awareness campaigns has on women’s behavior regarding cervical cancer prevention through screening. The results of the research show an increased percentage of the women understanding the importance of screening and the benefits of early diagnosis, but also shows that a high percentage of women postpone the routine checks due to lack of time and financial resources. The research results also indicate that the only free screening program implemented in Romania during 2012–2017 was a failure due to poor procedures, low number of women tested, underfunding and the lack of promotion. Our conclusion is that the Romanian Ministry of Health has to take immediate action by conducting major awareness campaigns and also by implementing functional screening programs. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Cancer as a Public Health Problem--Prevention of Cancer)
Show Figures

Figure 1

13 pages, 303 KiB  
Article
Barriers to Low-Dose CT Lung Cancer Screening among Middle-Aged Chinese
by Qike Jia, Hongliang Chen, Xuewei Chen and Qichuan Tang
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(19), 7107; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17197107 - 28 Sep 2020
Cited by 7 | Viewed by 2073
Abstract
Purpose: The current study aims to explore the barriers for middle-aged Chinese to learn about and uptake low-dose computed tomography (LDCT) lung cancer screening. Methods: Data were collected via an online survey in December 2019. Final valid sample included 640 respondents, aged 40–60 [...] Read more.
Purpose: The current study aims to explore the barriers for middle-aged Chinese to learn about and uptake low-dose computed tomography (LDCT) lung cancer screening. Methods: Data were collected via an online survey in December 2019. Final valid sample included 640 respondents, aged 40–60 years old, from 21 provinces of China. We performed multiple linear regressions to test the potential barriers to LDCT scan. Findings: Cost concerns, distrust in doctors, fears of disease, lack of knowledge, and optimistic bias are negatively associated with the intention to learn about and uptake LDCT scan. Implications: Our study contributes to understanding the negative predictors of middle-aged Chinese to get LDCT lung cancer scans. Future campaign programs should help audiences to build comprehensive understandings about lung cancer and LDCT scan. To better promote LDCT scan in China, the government should fund more trial programs continuously and public efforts should be made to rebuild the patient–doctor trust. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Cancer as a Public Health Problem--Prevention of Cancer)
16 pages, 868 KiB  
Article
Can Multidisciplinary Inpatient and Outpatient Rehabilitation Provide Sufficient Prevention of Disability in Patients with a Brain Tumor?—A Case-Series Report of Two Programs and A Prospective, Observational Clinical Trial
by Katarzyna Hojan and Karolina Gerreth
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(18), 6488; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17186488 - 6 Sep 2020
Cited by 5 | Viewed by 2842
Abstract
Brain tumor (BT) patients have a high incidence of disability due to the effects of the tumor itself or oncological treatment. Despite the incidence of neurological and functional deficits caused by BT, rehabilitation of those patients is not as properly established as in [...] Read more.
Brain tumor (BT) patients have a high incidence of disability due to the effects of the tumor itself or oncological treatment. Despite the incidence of neurological and functional deficits caused by BT, rehabilitation of those patients is not as properly established as in patients with other neurological conditions. The aim of the research was to evaluate the effectiveness of a multidisciplinary rehabilitation, carried out as an out- or in-patient program, as prevention of disability in BT patients. This was developed as a case-series report of two programs and a prospective, observational clinical study in BT patients who were allocated to inpatient (n = 28) or outpatient (n = 26) rehabilitation programs. The patients were assessed using the Barthel Index, Berg Balance Scale, Functional Independence Measure (FIM), Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy—Brain and Cognitive Function, and Addenbrooke’s Cognitive Examination III (ACE III) upon admission and after 12 weeks of rehabilitation. Analysis of the results showed that patients in both programs significantly improved their physical functioning scores in daily activities (p < 0.0001). We also observed significant reductions in most post-intervention cognitive complaints (p < 0.05), except for the FIM social functioning and ACE III language functioning in the outpatient group (p > 0.05) in contrast to inpatients (p < 0.001). This is evidence that early multidisciplinary rehabilitation is an effective therapeutic strategy to reduce BT symptoms and disability in this group of patients. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Cancer as a Public Health Problem--Prevention of Cancer)
Show Figures

Figure 1

10 pages, 670 KiB  
Article
Does Breast Cancer Increasingly Affect Younger Women?
by Katarzyna Konat-Bąska, Rafał Matkowski, Jerzy Błaszczyk, Dawid Błaszczyk, Urszula Staszek-Szewczyk, Natalia Piłat-Norkowska and Adam Maciejczyk
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(13), 4884; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17134884 - 7 Jul 2020
Cited by 19 | Viewed by 2789
Abstract
Breast cancer is the most frequently diagnosed malignant neoplasm among females. The proportion of women diagnosed in the premenopausal period is relatively small. Nevertheless, this is the most commonly diagnosed cancer among young women. The aim of the study was to analyze the [...] Read more.
Breast cancer is the most frequently diagnosed malignant neoplasm among females. The proportion of women diagnosed in the premenopausal period is relatively small. Nevertheless, this is the most commonly diagnosed cancer among young women. The aim of the study was to analyze the incidence rate of breast cancer in a group of young women based on data obtained in the Lower Silesian Voivodeship between 1984 and 2016. A total of 34,251 women with a diagnosis of invasive breast cancer were analyzed. The median age of diagnosis exhibited an upward trend from 57 to 63. The youngest age of breast cancer diagnosis did not decrease. Women up to the age of 24 were sporadically diagnosed. Given the total number of cases, the proportion of women under the age of 39 was approximately 5%, and it did not increase throughout the entire examination period. The major increase in the growth trend during the analyzed period was observed in a group of women aged of 50–69 (regression coefficient: +24.9) and above 70 (regression coefficient +21.2). In a group of women under 40 the regression coefficient was only +4. It seems that breast cancer does not increasingly affect younger women since the risk in this age group remains low. However, an increasing incidence rate of breast cancer is more commonly observed in premenopausal women. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Cancer as a Public Health Problem--Prevention of Cancer)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Review

Jump to: Research

17 pages, 1035 KiB  
Review
Virtual Reality as a Promising Tool Supporting Oncological Treatment in Breast Cancer
by Ewa Zasadzka, Anna Pieczyńska, Tomasz Trzmiel and Katarzyna Hojan
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(16), 8768; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18168768 - 19 Aug 2021
Cited by 14 | Viewed by 4007
Abstract
Breast cancer (BC) treatment is associated with many physical and psychological symptoms. Psychological distress or physical dysfunction are one of the most common side effects of oncological treatment. Functional dysfunction and pain-related evasion of movement may increase disability in BC. Virtual reality (VR) [...] Read more.
Breast cancer (BC) treatment is associated with many physical and psychological symptoms. Psychological distress or physical dysfunction are one of the most common side effects of oncological treatment. Functional dysfunction and pain-related evasion of movement may increase disability in BC. Virtual reality (VR) can offer BC women a safe environment within which to carry out various rehabilitation interventions to patient support during medical procedures. The aim of this systematic review was to conduct an overview of the clinical studies that used VR therapy in BC. The review was conducted in accordance with the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) guidelines method: the initial search identified a total of 144 records, and 11 articles met the review criteria and were selected for the analysis. The results showed that VR seems to be a promising tool supporting oncological treatment in BC patients. VR can have a positive effect on mental and physical functions, such as relieving anxiety during oncotherapy, diminution pain syndrome, and increasing the range of motion and performance in daily activities. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Cancer as a Public Health Problem--Prevention of Cancer)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Back to TopTop