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Environment and Behavior

A special issue of International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health (ISSN 1660-4601).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 November 2022) | Viewed by 23064

Special Issue Editor


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Guest Editor
Department of Health Sciences, School of Health and Human Sciences, Indiana University, 1050 Wishard Blvd, Indianapolis, IN 46202, USA
Interests: behavioral health; physical activity; healthy aging; motivation; habit

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues, 

This Special Issue calls for papers that investigate determinants of health-related behaviors beyond laboratory settings. The environmental influence on behavior choices has been acknowledged across several socioecological models and have been supported by empirical investigations. The purpose of this issue is to present novel studies that advance our understanding of health behavior change and maintenance in real-world environments. Environmental settings can include but are not limited to community centers, rehabilitation centers, workplace, and the home. Ideal submissions include theory-based investigations that are experimental studies, observational designs with follow-up measurements, or systematic reviews. 

Dr. Navin Kaushal
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

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Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2500 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • physical activity
  • exercise
  • sedentary
  • nutrition
  • health
  • behavior
  • theory
  • maintenance
  • environment

Published Papers (9 papers)

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Research

14 pages, 379 KiB  
Article
Shedding Light onto the City Blues Myth—The Potential of Stimulating and Activating Effects of Urban Public Spaces and the Role of City Relatedness
by Lena Lämmle, Eike von Lindern, Dorothee Rummel, Mark Michaeli and Matthias Ziegler
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2022, 19(13), 7606; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph19137606 - 21 Jun 2022
Viewed by 1258
Abstract
The present study aims to investigate whether a sense of relatedness to a city helps to broaden understanding of the restorative potential of urban public spaces. Findings based on a sample of German adults (n = 249) confirm that people experience relatedness [...] Read more.
The present study aims to investigate whether a sense of relatedness to a city helps to broaden understanding of the restorative potential of urban public spaces. Findings based on a sample of German adults (n = 249) confirm that people experience relatedness to a city. The study’s 3 × 3 (built, mixed, natural environment) × (average, livability environment, bird’s-eye view) design revealed disordinal interactions for being away, fascination, preference, mental fatigue, and stimulating and activating effects associated with cities. This implies that humans’ place perceptions are more complex than previously assumed. Both city and nature relatedness were relevant covariates of these findings. Surprisingly, the construct ‘activating effects’, was found to be mostly perceived as more positive for mixed and built environments compared to natural environments. Thus, complementing restorative environments research by introducing a measure for city relatedness significantly enhances understanding of the potential of urban public spaces for promoting human health and well-being. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Environment and Behavior)
20 pages, 682 KiB  
Article
The Mediating Role of Organisational Identification between Psychological Contract and Work Results: An Individual Level Investigation
by Anna Rogozińska-Pawełczyk and Katarzyna Gadomska-Lila
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2022, 19(9), 5404; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph19095404 - 28 Apr 2022
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 1865
Abstract
The aim of this article is to identify the relationship between the fulfilment of relational and transactional psychological contracts and work results, taking into account the mediation effect expressed in organisational identification. The empirical research was conducted on a group of 402 HR [...] Read more.
The aim of this article is to identify the relationship between the fulfilment of relational and transactional psychological contracts and work results, taking into account the mediation effect expressed in organisational identification. The empirical research was conducted on a group of 402 HR professionals responsible for designing and implementing HR practices in one of the leading companies of the Polish energy sector. Hypotheses were tested using the partial least squares structural equation modelling technique (PLS-SEM). Based on our research, we found that the implementation of both relational and transactional psychological contracts positively influenced the results achieved by HR professionals, both directly and indirectly, through the mediating role of organisational identification. The results indicate that the relationship between the psychological contract and work results is stronger when mediated by organisational identification. It plays an important role, especially in relation to the transactional contract. The collected results lead to the conclusion that organisations, wishing to increase the level of work results achieved by HR professionals, should as much as possible fulfil the expectations of employees and meet the commitments made to them within the framework of the established psychological contract. The study makes an important contribution to the understanding of the “priority” importance of organisational identification in enhancing the efforts of HR professionals to deliver work results that benefit both employees and the organisation. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Environment and Behavior)
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11 pages, 3726 KiB  
Article
Improving Household Safety via a Dynamic Air Terminal Device in Order to Decrease Carbon Monoxide Migration from a Gas Furnace
by Nina Szczepanik-Scislo
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2022, 19(3), 1676; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph19031676 - 01 Feb 2022
Cited by 10 | Viewed by 1500
Abstract
The airtightness of buildings is continuing to grow and impact the indoor environment. Its aim is to conserve energy, but this may influence the indoor air quality and increase contaminant accumulation by limiting the amount of fresh air that infiltrates the building. The [...] Read more.
The airtightness of buildings is continuing to grow and impact the indoor environment. Its aim is to conserve energy, but this may influence the indoor air quality and increase contaminant accumulation by limiting the amount of fresh air that infiltrates the building. The goal of this study was to quantify how the contaminants from a faulty gas furnace in a household could impact the occupants. The gas furnace was located in an attached garage and leaked carbon monoxide (CO). Multizone and CFD simulations were caried out to determine if an air terminal device (ATD) with a changing geometry could improve the air quality. The goal of the ATD was to maintain a steady air throw in the garage, while the air flow in the ventilation system would change. A steady air throw should help to remove the carbon monoxide generated from the furnace and prevent infiltration into the household. The results show that with the use of the new ATD, it was possible to maintain a steady air throw and the infiltration of CO was lowered. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Environment and Behavior)
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13 pages, 371 KiB  
Article
How and Why Patients Adhere to a Prescribed Cardiac Rehabilitation Program: A Longitudinal Phenomenological Study of Patients with Acute Coronary Syndrome
by Navin Kaushal, Donya Nemati, Raphaëlle Gauthier-Bisaillon, Marie Payer, Béatrice Bérubé, Martin Juneau and Louis Bherer
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2022, 19(3), 1482; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph19031482 - 28 Jan 2022
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 2479
Abstract
Background. Adherence to cardiac rehabilitation remains a challenge despite established evidence that engaging in regular exercise is a strong preventive measure to experiencing a second cardiac event. A recent study found a six-month cardiac rehabilitation program to be effective for facilitating regular exercise [...] Read more.
Background. Adherence to cardiac rehabilitation remains a challenge despite established evidence that engaging in regular exercise is a strong preventive measure to experiencing a second cardiac event. A recent study found a six-month cardiac rehabilitation program to be effective for facilitating regular exercise behavior among patients diagnosed with acute coronary syndrome. The purpose of this study was to conduct a phenomenological investigation using Colaizzi’s descriptive technique to understand mechanisms responsible for behavior change. Methods. Data were collected and analyzed among patients with acute coronary syndrome at a cardiac rehabilitation using semi-structured interviews that were conducted over the phone across three months. Conclusion. Thematic analysis of 15 semi-structured interviews resulted in 124 statements that were analyzed. The data yielded seven themes that included “motivation to follow prescribed exercise program”, “volitional decision”, “capability of performing exercise”, “connectedness to peers”, “planning”, “habit formation”, and “adopting healthy behaviors beyond exercise”. The emerged themes align with construct definitions of the self-determination theory, which include the three psychological needs (autonomy, competence, and relatedness), in addition to autonomous motivation, which represents internally driven reasons to participate in exercise. Planning and habit formation themes support contemporary research that identifies these constructs responsible for behavioral maintenance. While these themes help explain exercise participation, the final theme, adopting healthy behaviors beyond exercise, reflects the impact of the program on having a change towards a healthier lifestyle. The findings highlight the complexity of exercise behavior, and that long-term participation is likely explained by amalgamating the self-determination theory. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Environment and Behavior)
18 pages, 5763 KiB  
Article
“I’m a Winner, Not a Victim”: The Facilitating Factors of Post-Traumatic Growth among Women Who Have Suffered Intimate Partner Violence
by Hulda S. Bryngeirsdottir and Sigridur Halldorsdottir
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2022, 19(3), 1342; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph19031342 - 25 Jan 2022
Cited by 10 | Viewed by 4460
Abstract
Post-traumatic growth (PTG) is a positive psychological change following trauma. Intimate partner violence (IPV) is one such trauma. The aim of this phenomenological study was to explore PTG from the perspective of women who have survived IPV as well as their perceptions of [...] Read more.
Post-traumatic growth (PTG) is a positive psychological change following trauma. Intimate partner violence (IPV) is one such trauma. The aim of this phenomenological study was to explore PTG from the perspective of women who have survived IPV as well as their perceptions of PTG. Twenty-two female IPV survivors aged 23–56 who reached PTG, according to the working definition used, were interviewed. The overriding theme of the study was “I’m a winner, not a victim”, which describes the essence of the women’s experience of PTG. They described their experience as a shift from being suffering victims of IPV to becoming winners who enjoyed PTG. They felt that their positive attitude and personal strengths had helped them to reach PTG as well as to face the fact that they had been in an abusive relationship, thus forgiving and believing in themselves and taking responsibility for their own health and well-being. They sought knowledge about violence, how to process it, and how to respond to triggers. They set boundaries for their perpetrators and were in as little contact with them as possible. They chose the company of positive, supportive, and constructive people and situations where they were not being controlled. It was concluded that, even though suffering IPV is a terrible experience that no one should endure, the participants’ experiences had resulted in PTG that they treasured. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Environment and Behavior)
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17 pages, 498 KiB  
Article
Social Environment and Healthy Investment Behavior: Joint Influence of Culture and Institution on China
by Dongao Li and Songdong Shen
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2022, 19(1), 607; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph19010607 - 05 Jan 2022
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 2500
Abstract
The influence of the social environment on healthy investment behavior is a vital research topic. This paper focuses on foreign direct investment (FDI) as an important part of its broad impact in improving the level of capital circulation and diversifying the non-systemic risk [...] Read more.
The influence of the social environment on healthy investment behavior is a vital research topic. This paper focuses on foreign direct investment (FDI) as an important part of its broad impact in improving the level of capital circulation and diversifying the non-systemic risk of a single country portfolio. Using data from 35 countries on direct investment in China, we find that the impact of the social environment on healthy investment behavior is mainly reflected in investors’ resistance to cultural distance and their benefit compensation across institutional distance. In addition, their joint influence is still negative, dominated by cultural distance, which can still verify that institutional distance mitigates the negative effect of cultural distance on FDI. Therefore, in order to promote international healthy investment behavior, it is feasible to improve both the mitigation effect of the institution in the short term and promote the level of cultural exchange in the long term, according to the research results of this paper. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Environment and Behavior)
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16 pages, 2802 KiB  
Article
The Internal Connection Analysis of Information Sharing and Investment Performance in the Venture Capital Network Community
by Bing Feng, Kaiyang Sun, Ziqi Zhong and Min Chen
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(22), 11943; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph182211943 - 13 Nov 2021
Cited by 19 | Viewed by 2532
Abstract
In order to explore the internal connection between information sharing and investment performance in the venture capital network community, this study took environmental-governance start-ups as the research object and used the 2009–2020 environmental-social enterprise start-up venture capital investment events as a data sample. [...] Read more.
In order to explore the internal connection between information sharing and investment performance in the venture capital network community, this study took environmental-governance start-ups as the research object and used the 2009–2020 environmental-social enterprise start-up venture capital investment events as a data sample. The successful exit rate of the venture capital portfolio and the successful listing rate of investment ventures were used as the measurement criteria. Combined with regression analysis, the relationship between information sharing and investment performance in the venture capital network community was analyzed in detail. Research shows that there are differences between the ways of information sharing in the venture capital network communities. In the regression results, all coefficients are less than 0.01. There is a positive correlation between information sharing and investment performance in the venture capital network community. With the increase in enterprise characteristic variables, the degree of enterprise risk information sharing is getting higher and higher. This ultimately leads to more and more frequent corporate investment performance and a higher possibility of acquisition. Among them, the degree of information sharing in the venture capital network community is relatively high, and venture capital companies that are supported by corporate venture capital institutions will benefit even more from listed capital. Not only was the analysis of the relationship between finance and investment in the venture capital network community pointed out in this research, but also the investment development of entrepreneurial enterprises was also provided with feasible suggestions. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Environment and Behavior)
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20 pages, 956 KiB  
Article
The Impact of an Authoritarian Personality on Pro-Environmental Behaviour for Air Pollution Mitigation through Interactions with Social Norms
by Jiawen Cao and Jin Chen
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(17), 9301; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18179301 - 03 Sep 2021
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 2397
Abstract
This study examines how risk perception and authoritarian personality affect public engagement in mitigating air pollution. Data were collected (n = 2010) from 13 Chinese cities with varying air pollution gradients using questionnaires. The results demonstrated that air pollution was significantly correlated [...] Read more.
This study examines how risk perception and authoritarian personality affect public engagement in mitigating air pollution. Data were collected (n = 2010) from 13 Chinese cities with varying air pollution gradients using questionnaires. The results demonstrated that air pollution was significantly correlated with people’s risk perception and concern about air pollution, which significantly affected their pro-environmental behaviour (PEB). However, high-risk perceptions undermine the public’s self-efficacy and reduce people’s PEB in the private sphere. People with high scores of the authoritarian personality type were reluctant to engage in PEB in the private sphere; interestingly, it can also be transformed into a stronger PEB in the public sphere via social norms. Thus, this study suggests that educational activities can break the negative link between authoritarianism and environmentalism, leading to behavioural change. Hence, it is essential for education programs to harvest positive outcomes via adaptive approaches for varying authoritarian personalities. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Environment and Behavior)
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9 pages, 1406 KiB  
Article
Facilitating Exercise Habit Formation among Cardiac Rehabilitation Patients: A Randomized Controlled Pilot Trial
by Navin Kaushal, Marie Payer, Béatrice Bérubé, Martin Juneau and Louis Bherer
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(12), 6440; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18126440 - 14 Jun 2021
Cited by 5 | Viewed by 2387
Abstract
Background: The importance of promoting exercise adherence among individuals with acute coronary syndrome (ACS) is imperative. However, challenges in maintaining behavior among ACS patients are also well-documented. Emerging findings in the general population have supported the use of habit-formation techniques, which include incorporating [...] Read more.
Background: The importance of promoting exercise adherence among individuals with acute coronary syndrome (ACS) is imperative. However, challenges in maintaining behavior among ACS patients are also well-documented. Emerging findings in the general population have supported the use of habit-formation techniques, which include incorporating routine consistency and cues, to be effective for facilitating exercise behavior. The effectiveness of habit formation approaches, however, has not been tested on participants with ACS. The purpose of this study was to test the effectiveness of facilitating physical activity habits among patients with ACS in a two-arm, parallel design, randomized controlled pilot trial. Methods: Participants (n = 13) were older adult patients (M age = 64.20, SD = 5.35) with ACS who were referred to a cardiac rehabilitation center. The experimental group attended monthly group meetings from months 1–3 and received phone call follow-ups from months 4–6. Conclusions: The experimental group showed an increase in weekly moderate-to-vigorous level physical activity, M = 228.20 mins (SD = 112.45), compared with the control group, M = 151.17 (SD = 112.22), d = 0.61. The experimental condition also showed greater use of routine consistency (experimental: M = 4.60 (SD = 0.548); control: M = 3.76 (SD = 1.62)) and cue usage (experimental: M = 3.60 (SD = 0.471); control: M= 2.60 (SD = 0.398)) over the control condition at the six-month mark. The study supports the effectiveness of habit-building techniques among patients with ACS, with effect sizes ranging from a medium to large magnitude. Findings from this pilot study support a full clinical trial with larger sample size. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Environment and Behavior)
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