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Sexual and Domestic Violence and Adolescent Health

A special issue of International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health (ISSN 1660-4601). This special issue belongs to the section "Behavioral and Mental Health".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 1 July 2024 | Viewed by 9825

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Department of Legal Medicine, Università degli Studi di Milano, 20133 Milan, Italy
Interests: intimate partner violence; sexual violence; domestic violence; child abuse; autopsies; forensic and legal medicine; maltreatment
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals
Department of Health Science, Università del Piemonte Orientale, 28100 Novara, Italy
Interests: forensic and legal medicine; forensic genetics; gender violence; violence against women; sexual abuse; maltreatment
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
1. Gynecological Unit and SVSeD (Service for Sexual and Domestic Violence), IRCCS Ca' Granda, Maggiore Policlinico Hospital, 20122 Milan, Italy
2. Department of Clinical Sciences and Community Health, University of Milan, 20122 Milan, Italy
Interests: gynecology; endometriosis; sexology; gender violence; domestic violence; sexual violence
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Sexual violence and domestic violence are huge issues, still mostly hidden from view, yet widespread among society. Official numbers concerning its prevalence are underestimated due to cultural reasons, fear, and shame. Violence, no matter the form, deeply damages the wellness of a person, especially during physical and psychological development: adolescents are already undergoing a very challenging period in their life, and any form of violence may affect their health as well as the rest of their life.

For this reason, this Special Issue of the International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health (IJERPH) aims at deepening all aspects linked to violence experienced by adolescents: both sexual violence perpetrated by a stranger or a family member, and witnessed or domestic violence within the walls of their home.

Papers should focus on the current state of knowledge, with the purpose of finding out, detecting, and analyzing these situations. New research papers, reviews, case reports and conference papers are welcome to this Special Issue. We will accept manuscripts from different disciplines including epidemiology, proposals of new approaches, experiences of violence intervention centers all over the world, and risk and health impact assessments, including physical and psychological aspects.

You may choose our Joint Special Issue in Future. 

Dr. Federica Collini
Dr. Sarah Gino
Dr. Giussy Barbara
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2500 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • adolescents
  • sexual violence
  • domestic violence
  • intimate partner violence
  • child abuse
  • neglect
  • gender violence
  • adolescent health
  • physical health
  • psychological health

Published Papers (5 papers)

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Research

28 pages, 4529 KiB  
Article
Polyvictimization and Adolescent Health and Well-Being in Ethiopia: The Mediating Role of Resilience
by Lior Miller, Nicole M. Butera, Mary Ellsberg and Sarah Baird
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2023, 20(18), 6755; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph20186755 - 13 Sep 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1616
Abstract
Interpersonal violence is a pervasive experience affecting one billion children and adolescents annually, resulting in adverse health and well-being outcomes. Evidence suggests that polyvictimization, the experience of multiple forms of violence, is associated with more harmful consequences for adolescents than experiencing individual types [...] Read more.
Interpersonal violence is a pervasive experience affecting one billion children and adolescents annually, resulting in adverse health and well-being outcomes. Evidence suggests that polyvictimization, the experience of multiple forms of violence, is associated with more harmful consequences for adolescents than experiencing individual types of violence, although data from low-and middle-income countries are limited. This study analyzed data on over 4100 adolescents from the Gender and Adolescence, Global Evidence Study in Ethiopia to examine the association between polyvictimization and adolescent mental and physical health and the mediating role of resilience using linear regression and path analysis. We hypothesized that adolescents experiencing polyvictimization would experience worse mental and physical health than those experiencing no types or individual types of victimization, and that resilience would mediate these relationships. Half of sampled girls and over half of boys experienced polyvictimization. Among both sexes, polyvictimization was associated with worse mental but not worse physical health. Resilience mediated the association between polyvictimization and mental health among girls only. Strengthening resilience among girls may be an effective avenue for mitigating polyvictimization’s negative mental health effects, but additional research and programming for preventing and identifying polyvictimized adolescents and linking them to care is needed. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sexual and Domestic Violence and Adolescent Health)
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19 pages, 385 KiB  
Article
A Student-Centric Evaluation of a Program Addressing Prevention of Gender-Based Violence in Three African Countries
by Helen Cahill, Babak Dadvand, Anne Suryani and Anne Farrelly
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2023, 20(15), 6498; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph20156498 - 1 Aug 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1442
Abstract
Studies investigating the effectiveness of school-related gender-based violence prevention programs seldom report on the extent to which students themselves value and recommend such programs. Yet, along with evidence about effectiveness in relation to shifts in knowledge, attitudes, or intentions, student-valuing is a significant [...] Read more.
Studies investigating the effectiveness of school-related gender-based violence prevention programs seldom report on the extent to which students themselves value and recommend such programs. Yet, along with evidence about effectiveness in relation to shifts in knowledge, attitudes, or intentions, student-valuing is a significant indicator that the programs can make a positive contribution to students’ lives. This mixed-method study analyses survey and focus group data collected from ninety-two schools in three African countries (Tanzania, Zambia, and Eswatini). Students found the program contributed to improved peer relationships and identified the five most useful components as learning about gender equality and human rights, learning how to obtain help for those affected by violence, understanding and communicating about their emotions, strategies to avoid joining in with bullying and harassment, and understanding the effects of gender-based violence. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sexual and Domestic Violence and Adolescent Health)
16 pages, 1013 KiB  
Article
Clinical and Forensic Aspects of the Management of Child Abuse: The Experience of the Paediatric Emergency Department in Novara, North-West Italy
by Micol Puppi, Linda Rota, Lorenza Scotti, Ivana Rabbone and Sarah Gino
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2023, 20(3), 2028; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph20032028 - 22 Jan 2023
Viewed by 1488
Abstract
Background: Child abuse is an endemic phenomenon that refers to any form of violence aimed at children and adolescents. The Emergency Room is often the entry point to healthcare for the abused child. Methods: This is a cross-sectional study including minors, aged 0–18 [...] Read more.
Background: Child abuse is an endemic phenomenon that refers to any form of violence aimed at children and adolescents. The Emergency Room is often the entry point to healthcare for the abused child. Methods: This is a cross-sectional study including minors, aged 0–18 years, of all genders, who experienced any form of violence examined at the Paediatric Emergency Department of the ‘Maggiore della Carità’ Hospital in Novara (North-West Italy) between 1 January 2017 to 31 December 2021. Data were extrapolated by looking at the diagnosis at discharge. A comparison of the different variables collected was made between the pre-COVID-19 period and the COVID era. Results: 120 minors presented to the paediatric emergency room seeking help for violence. The average age was 10 years, 55% of the victims were male and 75% of them were Italian. In the pre-COVID period, the number of presentations for abuse was 62, while in the COVID period it was 58 with an increase of peer violence (from 38.71% to 62.07%) and with a statistically significant impact of the pandemic on the phenomenon (p-value < 0.00001). In general, peer violence accounts for 50% of the cases reviewed and resulted in fewer reports to the judicial authority and requests for forensic advice. Conclusion: The SARS-CoV-2-related pandemic has had an impact on total emergency room admissions and the types of abuse perpetrated. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sexual and Domestic Violence and Adolescent Health)
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13 pages, 357 KiB  
Article
Assessing the Influence of Child Sexual Behavior on Depression among Black SMM in the Southeastern United States
by Donte Travon Boyd, Gamji Rabiu Abu-Ba’are, Ashleigh LoVette, Darren L. Whitfield, Rodman E. Turpin, S. Raquel Ramos, Camille R. Quinn and DeMarc A. Hickson
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2022, 19(21), 13930; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph192113930 - 26 Oct 2022
Viewed by 1612
Abstract
Limited studies have examined the associations between child sexual abuse (CSA) and depression among Black sexual minority men (SMM) in the Southeastern United States (US). As, such, the current study examined the critical gap in understanding the impact of CSA on Black SMM’s [...] Read more.
Limited studies have examined the associations between child sexual abuse (CSA) and depression among Black sexual minority men (SMM) in the Southeastern United States (US). As, such, the current study examined the critical gap in understanding the impact of CSA on Black SMM’s mental health. Specifically, we tested the associations between contextual CSA factors and depression among a large population-based sample of Black SMM living in two cities in the Southern US. Data were obtained from the MARI Study, a sample of Black SMM ages 18–66 years, recruited from the Jackson, MS and Atlanta, GA metropolitan areas (n = 507). Depression was assessed using the 9-item CES-D scale. We conducted multivariable regression analyses to examine the association between depression with history of CSA and other child sexual-related variables (i.e., age of perpetrator and age of sexual abuse), controlling for key confounders. Our results indicated that CSA (β = 0.14, p < 0.001) was positively associated with depression. Our results also indicated that Black SMM who reported being sexually abused at the ages of 6 to 10 (β = 0.30, p < 0.01) and 16 to 18 (β = 0.25, p < 0.05) were positively associated with depression. These findings suggest that there is a need to provide culturally and safe mental health services in the Southeastern US for CSA survivors. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sexual and Domestic Violence and Adolescent Health)
15 pages, 410 KiB  
Article
Attitudes toward Transsexuality, Empathy, and Bullying in Young Population
by Jesús Esteban Mora, Francisco Manuel Morales Rodríguez and Juan Pedro Martínez Ramón
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2022, 19(7), 3849; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph19073849 - 24 Mar 2022
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 2553
Abstract
Affective-sexual and gender diversity is an increasingly distinctive and extended reality and should be acknowledged and respected. From a psychosocial and educational point of view, it is appropriate to review young people’s attitudes and knowledge regarding this, relating them to aspects such as [...] Read more.
Affective-sexual and gender diversity is an increasingly distinctive and extended reality and should be acknowledged and respected. From a psychosocial and educational point of view, it is appropriate to review young people’s attitudes and knowledge regarding this, relating them to aspects such as empathy, violence, or bullying, to implement quality education in the early stages of primary education. The main objective of this study was to analyze the relationship between empathy levels, attitudes toward transsexuality, and bullying among Spanish university students. The sample consisted of 247 students. Instruments were administered to evaluate negative attitudes toward transsexual people, gender ideology, transphobia, bullying, and empathy. Inverse relationships were found between transphobia and empathy. Regression analysis demonstrated the predictive ability of empathy on attitudes toward transsexual people. The results of this study are expected to increase awareness in society and encourage appropriate, satisfactory, or tolerable coexistence, in which all individuals can be free to live and express themselves. While the results indicated that the quality of life of transgender people has comparatively improved, there is still a long way to go. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sexual and Domestic Violence and Adolescent Health)

Planned Papers

The below list represents only planned manuscripts. Some of these manuscripts have not been received by the Editorial Office yet. Papers submitted to MDPI journals are subject to peer-review.

Title: Polyvictimization and adolescent health and well-being in Ethiopia: the mediating role of resilience
Authors: Lior Miller, Sarah Baird, Nicole Butera, and Mary Ellsberg
Affiliation: The George Washington University

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