ijerph-logo

Journal Browser

Journal Browser

University Students' Mental Health Problems: Causes and Solutions

A special issue of International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health (ISSN 1660-4601). This special issue belongs to the section "Mental Health".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 May 2023) | Viewed by 26615

Special Issue Editors

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

This Special Issue in the International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health follows on from the previous issues, University Students’ Health and Academic Achievement (https://www.mdpi.com/journal/ijerph/special_issues/university_students_health).

Recent studies have revealed that the percentage of the student population with mental health problems is higher than that of the general population; this significantly correlates with their academic performance and professional competence as well as with their overall health and well-being. The frequency, manifestation, and course of mental and behavioural problems in university students seem to be determined by a variety of factors, including stressful events, socio-demographic factors, and academic workload, among others. Some students are more likely to develop a mental disorder even in the absence of stressful life events, because the most critical period of some disorders is found in late adolescence and early adulthood. Additionally, an increasing number of students are entering universities with pre-existing mental disorders that remain undiagnosed or unattended to. 

Despite these facts, universities lack efficient strategies and the overall capacity to quickly identify and support vulnerable students. Many universities have been criticised for placing emphasis on a sterile scientific specialisation, while neglecting the individual vulnerabilities of their students and their ability to meet academic demands. It is also widely acknowledged that students’ resilience is not promoted by the curricula of many disciplines, and effective communication, empathy, and closeness are missing from the student–teacher relationship. This Special Issue welcomes papers that investigate individual and environmental factors with significant effects on students' health, mental health, and well-being, which could improve our understanding of the phenomenon and its particular characteristics. Other manuscripts that aim to improve prevention and advance treatment of health and mental health problems in university settings will be considered.

Dr. Maria Papadakaki
Dr. Joannes Chliaoutakis
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2500 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • university
  • students
  • mental health
  • behavioural problems
  • prevention
  • empathy
  • student–teacher relationship
  • treatment

Related Special Issue

Published Papers (12 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Jump to: Review, Other

12 pages, 379 KiB  
Article
Analysis of University Student Motivation in Cross-Border Contexts
by Lionel Sánchez-Bolívar, Silvia Navarro-Prado, María Angustias Sánchez-Ojeda, Victoria García-Morales, Jonathan Cortés-Martín and María Isabel Tovar-Gálvez
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2023, 20(11), 5924; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph20115924 - 23 May 2023
Viewed by 1134
Abstract
The development of the personality of university students can determine their affinities for certain disciplines; therefore, it is important to know their specific socio-demographic and motivational profile, what motivates them to start a certain university degree and what encourages them to continue with [...] Read more.
The development of the personality of university students can determine their affinities for certain disciplines; therefore, it is important to know their specific socio-demographic and motivational profile, what motivates them to start a certain university degree and what encourages them to continue with it, which can help to adapt the teaching methodology. A total of 292 university students from the University of Granada (Ceuta and Melilla campuses) participated in this quantitative study with a descriptive, cross-sectional design, in which motivation and social skills were analysed. Among the results, it can be highlighted that the student population is mainly female, with a higher level of motivation. Sociability, communication, thinking (optimistic or pessimistic), empathy and self-confidence are skills that affect university students’ motivation levels. This study highlights the importance and impact of students’ motivation on their learning and the development of their social competence, so it is essential to carry out educational interventions that promote these types of skills, especially in cross-border contexts, which can be demotivating environments. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue University Students' Mental Health Problems: Causes and Solutions)
13 pages, 357 KiB  
Article
Physical Activity, Screen Time, and Academic Burden: A Cross-Sectional Analysis of Health among Chinese Adolescents
by Yiting E, Jianke Yang, Yifei Shen and Xiaojuan Quan
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2023, 20(6), 4917; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph20064917 - 10 Mar 2023
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 1960
Abstract
This paper aims to analyze the effects of physical activity, screen time, and academic burden on adolescent health in China and compare their effects by using the nationally representative sample data from the CEPS (China Educational Panel Survey) cross-section data. This paper first [...] Read more.
This paper aims to analyze the effects of physical activity, screen time, and academic burden on adolescent health in China and compare their effects by using the nationally representative sample data from the CEPS (China Educational Panel Survey) cross-section data. This paper first uses regression analysis to examine the relationship between physical activity, screen time, academic burden and health among Chinese adolescents. Then, this paper uses the clustering analysis the influence of physical activity, screen time, and academic burden on the health of Chinese adolescents. The empirical results show that: (1) along with exercise, helping with the housework also has a clear health-promoting effect on adolescents; (2) the time spent surfing the Internet or playing video games, and heavy studying or homework off campus have a negative effect on adolescents’ self-rated health and mental health; (3) physical activity has the greatest impact on self-rated health, while screen time has the greatest impact on mental health, and academic burden is not the most important factor affecting adolescent health in China. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue University Students' Mental Health Problems: Causes and Solutions)
13 pages, 359 KiB  
Article
An Evaluation of Impostor Phenomenon in Data Science Students
by Lindsay Duncan, Gita Taasoobshirazi, Ashana Vaudreuil, Jitendra Sai Kota and Sweta Sneha
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2023, 20(5), 4115; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph20054115 - 25 Feb 2023
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 2304
Abstract
Impostor Phenomenon (IP), also called impostor syndrome, involves feelings of perceived fraudulence, self-doubt, and personal incompetence that persist despite one’s education, experience, and accomplishments. This study is the first to evaluate the presence of IP among data science students and to evaluate several [...] Read more.
Impostor Phenomenon (IP), also called impostor syndrome, involves feelings of perceived fraudulence, self-doubt, and personal incompetence that persist despite one’s education, experience, and accomplishments. This study is the first to evaluate the presence of IP among data science students and to evaluate several variables linked to IP simultaneously in a single study evaluating data science. In addition, it is the first study to evaluate the extent to which gender identification is linked to IP. We examined: (1) the degree to which IP exists in our sample; (2) how gender identification is linked to IP; (3) whether there are differences in goal orientation, domain identification, perfectionism, self-efficacy, anxiety, personal relevance, expectancy, and value for different levels of IP; and (4) the extent to which goal orientation, domain identification, perfectionism, self-efficacy, anxiety, personal relevance, expectancy, and value predict IP. We found that most students in the sample showed moderate and frequent levels of IP. Moreover, gender identification was positively related to IP for both males and females. Finally, results indicated significant differences in perfectionism, value, self-efficacy, anxiety, and avoidance goals by IP level and that perfectionism, self-efficacy, and anxiety were particularly noteworthy in predicting IP. Implications of our findings for improving IP among data science students are discussed. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue University Students' Mental Health Problems: Causes and Solutions)
15 pages, 2091 KiB  
Article
Loneliness in University Students during Two Transitions: A Mixed Methods Approach Including Biographical Mapping
by Janna Jaud, Tatiana Görig, Tobias Konkel and Katharina Diehl
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2023, 20(4), 3334; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph20043334 - 14 Feb 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1938
Abstract
Several studies have shown that loneliness is prevalent in university students. However, up to now, it is less clear how transitions during this life stage are associated with loneliness. Therefore, we aimed to explore the association of loneliness with the transition from high [...] Read more.
Several studies have shown that loneliness is prevalent in university students. However, up to now, it is less clear how transitions during this life stage are associated with loneliness. Therefore, we aimed to explore the association of loneliness with the transition from high school to university and the transition into the COVID-19 pandemic. Twenty students were interviewed in qualitative interviews based on a semi-structured guide that also included biographical mapping. In addition, the participants reported social and emotional loneliness based on the six-item De Jong Gierveld Loneliness Scale for three points in time: (1) at the time of the interview, (2) at the beginning of their studies at the university and (3) at the start of the COVID-19 pandemic. The qualitative data were analyzed using a structuring content analysis following Mayring. The quantitative data were analyzed using descriptive statistics. We found that emotional loneliness increased both during high school graduation and at the start of study at the university, as well as at the beginning of the COVID-19 pandemic. Social loneliness was higher during university studies than during the last years at high school and increased at the beginning of the pandemic. The results indicate that both transitions played an important role for perceived social and emotional loneliness. Further quantitative studies in larger samples will be relevant in the future to better target the responses to loneliness during transitions. Universities can actively counteract loneliness, especially during the transition from high school to university, by organizing events and meeting places where new students can network. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue University Students' Mental Health Problems: Causes and Solutions)
Show Figures

Figure 1

11 pages, 349 KiB  
Article
Nomophobia and Self-Esteem: A Cross Sectional Study in Greek University Students
by Elissavet Vagka, Charalambos Gnardellis, Areti Lagiou and Venetia Notara
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2023, 20(4), 2929; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph20042929 - 08 Feb 2023
Cited by 7 | Viewed by 2147
Abstract
Nomophobia is a relatively new term describing someone’s fear, discomfort, or anxiety when his/her smartphone is not available. It is reported that low self-esteem may contribute to an individual’s tendency for nomophobia. The aim of this particular study was to investigate the association [...] Read more.
Nomophobia is a relatively new term describing someone’s fear, discomfort, or anxiety when his/her smartphone is not available. It is reported that low self-esteem may contribute to an individual’s tendency for nomophobia. The aim of this particular study was to investigate the association between nomophobia and self-esteem among Greek university students. The study sample consisted of 1060 male and female university students aged 18 to 25 years, participating on a voluntary basis with an online anonymous questionnaire. Data were collected through “Nomophobia Questionnaire (NMP-Q)” and “Rosenberg’s self-esteem scale (RSES)”. All participants exhibited some level of nomophobia, with the moderate level prevailing (59.6%). Regarding self-esteem categories, 18.7% of the participants showed low self-esteem, while the rest showed normal/high levels. Students with low self-esteem were twice as likely to exhibit a higher level of nomophobia compared to those with normal/high (adj Cum OR = 1.99, p value < 0.001). Additionally, women and students having fathers without a university education had a higher risk of exhibiting a greater level of nomophobia (adj Cum OR = 1.56 and 1.44, respectively, p values ≤ 0.008). It was observed that low self-esteem and nomophobia are closely connected. Further investigation into this particular issue is needed to explore potential causality between them. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue University Students' Mental Health Problems: Causes and Solutions)
12 pages, 1077 KiB  
Article
Cognitive and Interpersonal Factors Affecting Social Adjustment of University Students in Pakistan
by Saima Kayani, Niaz Muhammad Aajiz, Khisro Kaleem Raza, Sumaira Kayani and Michele Biasutti
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2023, 20(1), 655; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph20010655 - 30 Dec 2022
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 2078
Abstract
Cognitive and interpersonal factors play an important role in the social adjustment of students. Factors affecting the social adjustment of university students have been verified in different cultures. However, no study has tested a concurrent model with the study variables in the Pakistani [...] Read more.
Cognitive and interpersonal factors play an important role in the social adjustment of students. Factors affecting the social adjustment of university students have been verified in different cultures. However, no study has tested a concurrent model with the study variables in the Pakistani context. This study aimed to investigate the effect of personal and interpersonal factors on the social adjustment of university students in Pakistan. Three hundred participants from the Azad Jammu and Kashmir regions of Pakistan responded on a questionnaire package containing self-reported measures on social self-efficacy, social anxiety, teachers’ social support, and peers’ social support. The results indicate that self-efficacy, teachers’ support, and peer support have a significant positive effect on the social adjustment of university students, suggesting that an enhanced self-efficacy, and increased teachers’ and peers’ support would increase social adjustment. However, academic anxiety is inversely associated with social adjustment, suggesting that a higher anxiety level would result in a reduction in social adjustment. Students should be given more opportunities to enhance self-efficacy, obtain social support, and reduce social anxiety. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue University Students' Mental Health Problems: Causes and Solutions)
Show Figures

Figure 1

14 pages, 381 KiB  
Article
An Assessment of the Reliability and Validity of the PERMA Well-Being Scale for Adult Undergraduate Students in an Open and Distance Learning Context
by Ishmael Magare, Marien Alet Graham and Irma Eloff
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2022, 19(24), 16886; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph192416886 - 15 Dec 2022
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 2513
Abstract
Background: The PERMA well-being scale measures the multidimensionality of well-being in human populations. It highlights positive emotions, engagement, relationships, meaning, and accomplishment. Despite the empirical advancement and evolution of the PERMA scale in different settings, its applicability to open and distance learning (ODL) [...] Read more.
Background: The PERMA well-being scale measures the multidimensionality of well-being in human populations. It highlights positive emotions, engagement, relationships, meaning, and accomplishment. Despite the empirical advancement and evolution of the PERMA scale in different settings, its applicability to open and distance learning (ODL) has not been adequately established among undergraduate students in sub-Saharan Africa. Methodology: Our study examines the theoretical reliability, validity, and five-factor structure of the shortened 35-item version of the PERMA well-being scale as it was adapted in an ODL tertiary institution in Botswana. The PERMA model of well-being and self-determination theory (SDT) served as theoretical frameworks. We evaluated the adapted PERMA scale’s reliability, construct validity, confirmatory factor analysis, and measures of invariance to assess if the data of undergraduate students in an ODL context study fitted the PERMA model of a well-being five-factor structure. We used a multi-stage sampling scheme incorporating a convenience sampling approach where the respondents were invited to voluntarily participate in the study through a WhatsApp group, followed by snowball sampling where we asked the participants to add others to the WhatsApp group during the timeline of the survey; the sample comprised 215 respondents (age: mean = 38.17, standard deviation = 6.472). We collected data from former and active undergraduate B.Ed. (Bachelor of Education) degree students from five regional campuses of the open university through an online survey built into the Qualtrics platform. The Cronbach’s alpha indicated that one item should be removed from the engagement domain. Results: The overall adapted scale retained a 34-item PERMA well-being scale in the particular ODL context. The goodness of fit indices confirmed the five-domain structure with the 34 items. Conclusions: The psychometric properties of the 34-item adapted PERMA well-being scale suggest that it can be a valuable and feasible instrument in ODL in sub-Saharan Africa. Furthermore, the adapted scale can be applied in educational settings moving towards open and distance e-learning forms of delivery. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue University Students' Mental Health Problems: Causes and Solutions)
16 pages, 931 KiB  
Article
College Students’ Degree of Support for Online Learning during the COVID-19 Pandemic and Associated Factors: A Cross-Sectional Study
by Xincheng Huang, Yuqian Deng, Pu Ge, Xiaonan Sun, Mengjie Huang, Hejie Chen, Yanyan Wang, Baojun Suo, Zhiqiang Song and Yibo Wu
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2022, 19(24), 16814; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph192416814 - 14 Dec 2022
Viewed by 1670
Abstract
Background: Educational institutions worldwide have experienced the suspension of offline teaching activities in favor of online teaching due to the outbreak of the COVID-19 pandemic. However, few studies have focused on the degree of support for online learning among college students in mainland [...] Read more.
Background: Educational institutions worldwide have experienced the suspension of offline teaching activities in favor of online teaching due to the outbreak of the COVID-19 pandemic. However, few studies have focused on the degree of support for online learning among college students in mainland China. Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate the degree of support for online learning among Chinese college students during the epidemic and whether depression, loneliness, family communication, and social support were associated factors. Methods: A questionnaire was used to collect cross-sectional data from 9319 college students in mainland China, and a structural equation model was analyzed. Results: The results of the study showed high degrees of support for online learning among Chinese college students during the COVID-19 pandemic, with more than half expressing support. The SEM (Structural Equation Modeling) results showed that depression had a negative and significant effect on college students’ support for online learning (β = −0.07; p < 0.001); family communication had a positive and significant effect on college students’ support for online learning (β = 0.09; p < 0.001); social support had a positive and significant effect on college students’ support for online learning (β = 0.11; p < 0.001). Conclusions: Social support and family communication can alleviate the negative psychological status of college students, and depression plays a mediating role in the effect of social support and family communication on college students’ degree of support for online learning. In addition, a significant chain-mediating effect was found of family communication, loneliness, and depression between social support and college students’ degree of support for online learning. Government and education institutions must focus on college students’ mental health issues and consider family interventions and general support that college students require. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue University Students' Mental Health Problems: Causes and Solutions)
Show Figures

Figure 1

13 pages, 1252 KiB  
Article
English Learning Stress, Self-Efficacy, and Burnout among Undergraduate Students: The Moderating Effect of Mindfulness and Gender
by Liling Xu, Huahua Wang, Jiaxin Chen, Yiwen Zhang, Zhiqi Huang and Chengfu Yu
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2022, 19(23), 15819; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph192315819 - 28 Nov 2022
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 2125
Abstract
Research has indicated that English learning stress contributes significantly to English learning burnout among undergraduate students. However, knowledge of the mediating and moderating mechanisms underlying this relationship is limited. To bridge this gap, a moderated mediation model was constructed to examine whether English [...] Read more.
Research has indicated that English learning stress contributes significantly to English learning burnout among undergraduate students. However, knowledge of the mediating and moderating mechanisms underlying this relationship is limited. To bridge this gap, a moderated mediation model was constructed to examine whether English learning self-efficacy mediated the relationship between English learning stress and English learning burnout. Furthermore, this study analyzed whether the mediated relationship was moderated by mindfulness and gender. A total of 1130 Chinese undergraduate students (mean age = 20.84 years, SD = 1.57 years) reported their experiences regarding English learning stress, English learning self-efficacy, English learning burnout, and mindfulness. After controlling for covariates, the results revealed that English learning self-efficacy mediated the positive link between English learning stress and English learning burnout among both men and women. Moreover, the findings demonstrated that the indirect link was moderated by mindfulness among male undergraduate students. However, the moderating effect of mindfulness was not significant among the women in this study. The implications of these findings for future research, and the development of intervention and prevention of English learning burnout are discussed. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue University Students' Mental Health Problems: Causes and Solutions)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Review

Jump to: Research, Other

23 pages, 951 KiB  
Review
Effectiveness of Physical-Activity-Based Interventions Targeting Overweight and Obesity among University Students—A Systematic Review
by Julia Pfisterer, Constantin Rausch, Doreen Wohlfarth, Philip Bachert, Darko Jekauc and Kathrin Wunsch
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2022, 19(15), 9427; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph19159427 - 01 Aug 2022
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 3416
Abstract
Overweight and obesity, including their prevalence and consequences, reflect a leading public health problem. Studies have already shown that physical activity leads to a reduction in body weight in children and adults. However, the university setting has rarely been investigated. The aim of [...] Read more.
Overweight and obesity, including their prevalence and consequences, reflect a leading public health problem. Studies have already shown that physical activity leads to a reduction in body weight in children and adults. However, the university setting has rarely been investigated. The aim of this review is, therefore, to examine and summarize the effectiveness of physical-activity-based interventions to reduce obesity and overweight in university students. Three databases (PubMed, Scopus, and Web of Science) were searched for relevant studies published in English between January 2010 and February 2022. Quantitative studies conducting a physical-activity-based intervention with overweight or obese university students and reporting changes in BMI were included. Data were described in a narrative synthesis. Out of 16 included studies, 11 reported a significant reduction in BMI. However, all studies except one were able to demonstrate some BMI improvements, whereas all studies reported significant changes in at least one health-related indicator. Aerobic exercises were able to demonstrate the greatest reductions in BMI. This review is the first systematic presentation on the effectiveness of physical-activity-based interventions in overweight and obese university students. Future work should reconsider BMI as the primary outcome if appropriate within the respective study design (i.e., to measure long-term effects). More interventions are needed to improve strategies. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue University Students' Mental Health Problems: Causes and Solutions)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Other

Jump to: Research, Review

7 pages, 301 KiB  
Brief Report
Gaming Disorder and Psycho-Emotional Wellbeing among Male University Students and Other Young Adults in Israel
by Richard Isralowitz, Shai-li Romem Porat, Yuval Zolotov, Mor Yehudai, Adi Dagan and Alexander Reznik
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2022, 19(23), 15946; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph192315946 - 30 Nov 2022
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1384
Abstract
The aim of this cross-sectional study was to examine the impact of gaming and gaming disorder on the wellbeing of Israeli male university students and other adults. Gaming disorder (i.e., persistent, and recurrent gaming activity associated with a lack of control that may [...] Read more.
The aim of this cross-sectional study was to examine the impact of gaming and gaming disorder on the wellbeing of Israeli male university students and other adults. Gaming disorder (i.e., persistent, and recurrent gaming activity associated with a lack of control that may be clinically diagnosed) was determined using the Internet Gaming Disorder Scale–Short-Form (IGDS9-SF). Survey participants were recruited from gaming associations, clubs and the gaming community using Facebook. Data were collected in June 2022. A total of 526 males completed the survey (30.9% university students and 69.1% other young adults). Various statistical methods of analysis including regression were used for this study. Significant study group differences revealed university students with more indications of gaming disorder, more burnout, less loneliness, more stimulant (i.e., Ritalin) use, a greater consumption of salt- and/or sugar-loaded foods and lower economic wellbeing. The levels of resilience (i.e., the ability to recover from stress), substance use (e.g., tobacco and alcohol) and weight gain were similar for the two groups. Regression analysis showed gaming disorder as a key predictor of burnout, economic wellbeing and resilience. This study examined only male gamers because of the small number of female respondents. However, additional research is needed about female internet gamers, including their possible exposure to online harassment and sexual degradation. Additionally, additional research should be considered to verify the present study’s findings about gamers based on demographic factors and gaming disorder levels. Prevention and treatment intervention measures, including those that can be made available on campus, should be thought about by university administration personnel and student association leaders in consultation with professionals who are experienced in reducing gaming disorder and other harmful behaviors among students. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue University Students' Mental Health Problems: Causes and Solutions)
11 pages, 740 KiB  
Protocol
The Effect of a Sleep Intervention on Sleep Quality in Nursing Students: Study Protocol for a Randomized Controlled Trial
by Cayetana Ruiz-Zaldibar, Beatriz Gal-Iglesias, Clara Azpeleta-Noriega, Montserrat Ruiz-López and David Pérez-Manchón
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2022, 19(21), 13886; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph192113886 - 25 Oct 2022
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 2897
Abstract
We develop a protocol for assessing the impact of an intervention aimed at improving sleep quality among university nursing students. The study is designed as a pilot randomized controlled trial to be applied during the 2022-23 academic year and is registered at Clinical [...] Read more.
We develop a protocol for assessing the impact of an intervention aimed at improving sleep quality among university nursing students. The study is designed as a pilot randomized controlled trial to be applied during the 2022-23 academic year and is registered at Clinical Trials Gov website (NCT05273086). A total of 60 nursing students will be recruited from a Spanish university. They will be divided into two groups: (30) intervention group and (30) control group. The intervention group will attend two cognitive–behavioural therapy sleep programme sessions focused on knowledge of anatomical structures involved in sleep, chronotype, synchronization, and good sleeping habits. Subjective and objective sleep quality will be assessed before and after the intervention for both groups. In addition to sleep quality, socio-demographic parameters, physical activity, lifestyle habits, and anthropometric measures will be considered prior to intervention. Finally, a satisfaction questionnaire will be applied for posterior analysis. This study is an innovative, relevant intervention that aims to improve sleep quality among university nursing students. Both the approach and the use of objective and subjective validated outcome measurements are key features of this study. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue University Students' Mental Health Problems: Causes and Solutions)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Back to TopTop