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Rehabilitation and Healthcare Systems that Work

A special issue of International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health (ISSN 1660-4601). This special issue belongs to the section "Health Care Sciences & Services".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 March 2020) | Viewed by 19342

Special Issue Editor


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Guest Editor
1. Rehabilitation and Health Services, University of North Texas, USA
2. Discipline of Rehabilitation Counselling, The University of Sydney, Australia
Interests: Disability, Function, Health, Systems, Community Living, Assessment, WHO ICF

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The global burden from managing chronic health conditions is on the increase, while most health care systems aim to address acute medical care needs. Where health care systems prioritize primarily diagnostic medical needs rather than health functioning, high financial costs are likely from avoidable re-admissions, morbidity and mortality. This is unfortunate in that health care systems that fail to address functioning and disability for health sustenance overburden already strained health care resources.  People who display complex health conditions require health care systems framed on an interdisciplinary approach to health care, one that priorities functioning over diagnosis and involves strategic communication between providers, payers, and consumers to deliver care in a reliable, timely, effective, and efficient manner. The World Health Organization’s International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (WHO ICF, 2001) provides a comprehensive, universal and internationally accepted model for describing functioning and for managing chronic disease as complex phenomena requiring interventions at the person and environment levels. It goes beyond diagnosis to address functioning and disability, taking into account the care choices and values of the person receiving health care as well as recognition of a need to make critical choices correctly. Yet the adoption of the WHO ICF for framing and delivering health systems remains the exception rather than the rule.  This Special issue seeks research manuscripts on health care systems framed on the WHO ICF. Especially we encourage the submission of interdisciplinary work and multi-country collaborative research. We also encourage the submission of health systems and health policy-related manuscripts that focus on issues of interdisciplinary care, including for disability insurance and community living support. Manuscripts should address any of the design, implementation and evaluation of specific health care systems framed on the ICF, the evidence for their operational efficacy addressing person- oriented care, cost effectiveness, quality of care, instruments or protocols and inter-sectoral collaborations. We welcome original research papers using different study designs as well as systematic reviews and meta-analysis.

Prof. Elias Mpofu
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2500 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Health and function
  • Healthcare systems
  • Patient-oriented care
  • Design and implementation
  • Disability insurance
  • Community living
  • WHO ICF
  • Chronic illness and disease

Published Papers (5 papers)

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Research

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12 pages, 1223 KiB  
Article
Effects of Augmented-Reality-Based Exercise on Muscle Parameters, Physical Performance, and Exercise Self-Efficacy for Older Adults
by Sangwan Jeon and Jiyoun Kim
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(9), 3260; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17093260 - 7 May 2020
Cited by 35 | Viewed by 5260
Abstract
This study was intended to determine the applicability of an augmented-reality-based muscle reduction prevention exercise program for elderly Korean women by observing changes in exercise self-efficacy and verifying the effectiveness of the program in the elderly after the application of the program. A [...] Read more.
This study was intended to determine the applicability of an augmented-reality-based muscle reduction prevention exercise program for elderly Korean women by observing changes in exercise self-efficacy and verifying the effectiveness of the program in the elderly after the application of the program. A total of 27 participants, who were elderly women aged 65+ and had not participated in any exercise programs until this study, were recruited for this study. They were divided into an experimental group (13 people) and a control group (14 people), and then the augmented-reality-based muscle reduction prevention exercise program was applied. This was a 30-min program, which included regular, aerobic, and flexibility exercises, and it was applied 5 times a week for 12 weeks. As a result of observing changes, it was found that the appendicular skeletal muscle mass (ASM) (F = 11.222, p < 0.002) and the skeletal muscle index (SMI) (kg/m2) (F = 10.874, p < 0.003) muscle parameters increased more in the experimental group compared to the control group, and there was a significant increase in gait speed (m/s) (F = 7.221, p < 0.005). For physical performance, as a result of conducting the Senior Fitness Test (SFT), a significant change was observed in the chair stand test (F = 5.110, p < 0.033), 2-min step test (2MST) (F = 6.621, p < 0.020), and the timed up-and-go test (TUG) (F = 5.110, p < 0.032) and a significant increase was also observed for exercise self-efficacy (F = 20.464, p < 0.001). Finally, the augmented-reality-based exercise program in this study was found to be effective in inducing physical activity in the elderly. Therefore, the augmented-reality-based muscle reduction prevention exercise program is considered to be effective in increasing the sustainability of exercise, thus preventing muscle reduction in the elderly. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Rehabilitation and Healthcare Systems that Work)
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11 pages, 763 KiB  
Article
Sociodemographic Determinants for the Health-Related Quality of Life of Patients with Vascular Amputations as Determined with the Prosthesis Evaluation Questionnaire
by José Vicente Benavent, José María Tenías, Ana Pellin, Jorge Casaña Mohedo, Ana Cristina Cabellos-García and Vicente Gea-Caballero
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(8), 2691; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17082691 - 14 Apr 2020
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 3047
Abstract
Background: To identify the sociodemographic variables independently related to the different dimensions of the Prosthesis Evaluation Questionnaire (PEQ). Methods: An observational, cross-sectional study was conducted, with a sample of 61 Spanish vascular amputees (Valencia, Spain). Included in this study are the results of [...] Read more.
Background: To identify the sociodemographic variables independently related to the different dimensions of the Prosthesis Evaluation Questionnaire (PEQ). Methods: An observational, cross-sectional study was conducted, with a sample of 61 Spanish vascular amputees (Valencia, Spain). Included in this study are the results of the PEQ and explanatory-sociodemographic variables, as well as a descriptive and analytic analysis. Results: Gender differences were observed in “appearance” and “perception of appearance” (significantly higher levels for men). Older patients tended to have worse scores in “utility”, “frustration”, “social burden” and “deambulation”. More favorable scores were obtained for those residing in rural areas in “social burden” and “deambulation”. Educational level had a positive correlation with scores. Conclusion: Gender, age, place of residence, and educational level could be considered determinants of the quality of health related to prosthesis adaptation in vascular amputees. Clinical relevance: Knowing the influential variables in the process of prosthetization will allow better adaptation and an improvement in the quality of life. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Rehabilitation and Healthcare Systems that Work)
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8 pages, 298 KiB  
Article
The Effects of Active Self-Correction on Postural Control in Girls with Adolescent Idiopathic Scoliosis: The Role of an Additional Mental Task
by Elżbieta Piątek, Michał Kuczyński and Bożena Ostrowska
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(5), 1640; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17051640 - 3 Mar 2020
Cited by 5 | Viewed by 2943
Abstract
Due to balance deficits that accompany adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (AIS), the potential interaction between activities of daily living and active self-correction movements (ASC) on postural control deserves particular attention. Our purpose was to assess the effects of ASC movements with or without a [...] Read more.
Due to balance deficits that accompany adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (AIS), the potential interaction between activities of daily living and active self-correction movements (ASC) on postural control deserves particular attention. Our purpose was to assess the effects of ASC movements with or without a secondary mental task on postural control in twenty-five girls with AIS. It is a quasi-experimental within-subject design with repeated measures ANOVA. They were measured in four 20-s quiet standing trials on a force plate: no task, ASC, Stroop test, and both. Based on the center-of-pressure (COP) recordings, the COP parameters were computed. The ASC alone had no effect on any of the postural sway measures. Stroop test alone decreased COP speed and increased COP entropy. Performing the ASC movements and Stroop test together increased the COP speed and decreased COP entropy as compared to the baseline data. In conclusion, our results indicate that AIS did not interfere with postural control. The effects of the Stroop test accounted for good capacity of subjects with AIS to take advantage of distracting attentional resources from the posture. However, performing both tasks together exhibited some deficits in postural control, which may suggest the need for therapeutic consultation while engaging in more demanding activities. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Rehabilitation and Healthcare Systems that Work)
13 pages, 2297 KiB  
Article
Content and Delivery of Physical Therapy in Multiple Sclerosis across Europe: A Survey
by Kamila Řasová, Jenny Freeman, Davide Cattaneo, Johanna Jonsdottir, Ilse Baert, Tori Smedal, Anders Romberg, Peter Feys, Jose Alves-Guerreiro, Mario Habek, Thomas Henze, Carme Santoyo-Medina, Antonie Beiske, Paul Van Asch, Daphne Bakalidou, Yeliz Salcı, Erieta Dimitrova, Markéta Pavlíková, Ivana Štětkářová, Jana Vorlíčková and Patricia Martinkováadd Show full author list remove Hide full author list
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(3), 886; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17030886 - 31 Jan 2020
Cited by 16 | Viewed by 4789
Abstract
Background: Guidelines and general recommendations are available for multiple sclerosis rehabilitation, but no specific guidance exists for physical therapists. Describing aspects of physical therapy content and delivery in multiple sclerosis and its determinants and analysing whether general recommendations connected with physical therapy are [...] Read more.
Background: Guidelines and general recommendations are available for multiple sclerosis rehabilitation, but no specific guidance exists for physical therapists. Describing aspects of physical therapy content and delivery in multiple sclerosis and its determinants and analysing whether general recommendations connected with physical therapy are implemented in practice is important for interpreting clinical and research evidence. Methods: An online cross-sectional survey of physical therapists specialized in multiple sclerosis (212 specialists from 26 European countries) was used. Results: There was distinct diversity in service delivery and content across Europe. Perceived accessibility of physical therapy varied from most accessible in the Western region, and least in the Southern region. Sixty-four physical therapists adjusted their approach according to different disability levels, less so in the Eastern region. Duration, frequency and dose of sessions differed between regions, being highest in Southern and Western regions. “Hands on treatment” was the most commonly used therapeutic approach in all apart from the Northern regions, where “word instruction” (providing advice and information) prevailed. Conclusions: The content and delivery of physical therapy differs across Europe. Recommendations concerning access to treatment and adjustment according to disability do not appear to be widely implemented in clinical practice. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Rehabilitation and Healthcare Systems that Work)
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Review

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17 pages, 641 KiB  
Review
Health-Related Rehabilitation after the 2008 Great Wenchuan Earthquake in China: A Ten Year Retrospective Systematic Review
by Joseph Kimuli Balikuddembe, Xinglin Zeng and Chuandong Chen
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(7), 2297; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17072297 - 29 Mar 2020
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 2595
Abstract
Being one of the world’s seismically hazard-prone countries, the People’s Republic of China (PRC) witnessed an 8.0-magnitude earthquake on May 12th 2008—which was reported as one of the most destructive disasters since its founding. Following this earthquake, rehabilitation was greatly required for survivors [...] Read more.
Being one of the world’s seismically hazard-prone countries, the People’s Republic of China (PRC) witnessed an 8.0-magnitude earthquake on May 12th 2008—which was reported as one of the most destructive disasters since its founding. Following this earthquake, rehabilitation was greatly required for survivors to enable them to achieve and maintain optimal independence; functioning; full physical, mental and social ability; inclusion; and participation in all aspects of life and environments. We conducted a systematic review based on Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) guidelines to retrospectively identify, in five English databases/sources, the existing evidence about the Health-Related Rehabilitation (HRR) that was rendered to the survivors of the 2008 Wenchuan earthquake between 2008 and 2018. Only 11 studies out of 828 initial studies retrieved were included in our study and reported the survivors of the 2008 Wenchuan earthquake to have been aged between 10.5 and 55.7, and predominantly diagnosed with posttraumatic stress disorders. Their HRR was mainly premised on physical and physiological therapies, as well as traditional Chinese medicine and digital technologies. Although all HRR interventions used were reported to be effective, none was identified as much more effective than the others in the post-earthquake era —which calls for more robust research to build upon our systematic review. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Rehabilitation and Healthcare Systems that Work)
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