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Advances in Oral Oncology

A special issue of International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health (ISSN 1660-4601). This special issue belongs to the section "Global Health".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 March 2022) | Viewed by 14488

Special Issue Editor


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Guest Editor
Post-Graduate School of Oral Surgery, Department of Health Sciences, University of Catanzaro “Magna Graecia”, 88100 Catanzaro, Italy
Interests: bone augmentation procedures; dental implantology; maxillofacial surgery; oral pathology; oral surgery; platelet-rich fibrin
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Head and neck cancer is the sixth most common cancer worldwide. Oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) is the most common head and neck malignancy, characterized by a highly invasive capacity, lymph node metastasis, and high recurrence rate. Prognosis is poor, showing a 5-year survival rate of 50–60%. It is accepted that OSCC arises from multiple genetic alterations also related to risk factors such as alcohol, smoking, viral infections, and chronic inflammation. Oral premalignant lesions and conditions are precursors of OSCC. The molecular mechanisms of carcinogenesis, tumor progression, and metastasis of oral cancer have been elucidated by recent advances in molecular biology. However, many unsolved questions still remain.

This Special Issue entitled “Advances in Oral Oncology” has the objective of developing an updated investigation and rationale of biological behavior of oral squamous cell carcinoma focusing on molecular biology, pathology, biomarkers, genetics, diagnostics, and therapeutics. Scientific contributions regarding oral complications after cancer treatment will also be considered.

Prof. Dr. Amerigo Giudice
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

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Keywords

  • Oral squamous cell carcinoma
  • Oral medicine
  • Oral pathology
  • Oral potentially malignant disorders
  • Head and neck cancer
  • Molecular markers
  • Targeted therapy
  • Immunotherapy
  • Oral complications of cancer therapies

Published Papers (4 papers)

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10 pages, 2059 KiB  
Article
Oral Malignant Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma: A Retrospective Single-Center Study
by Selene Barone, Caterina Buffone, Martina Ferrillo, Federica Pasqua, Stefano Parrotta, Marianna Salviati, Francesco Bennardo and Alessandro Antonelli
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2022, 19(5), 2605; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph19052605 - 24 Feb 2022
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 4939
Abstract
This study aimed to retrospectively evaluate the incidence of oral non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) in patients referred to the Academic Hospital of the Magna Graecia University of Catanzaro from 2002 to 2020. A retrospective single-center study was performed. Patients with a histologically confirmed diagnosis [...] Read more.
This study aimed to retrospectively evaluate the incidence of oral non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) in patients referred to the Academic Hospital of the Magna Graecia University of Catanzaro from 2002 to 2020. A retrospective single-center study was performed. Patients with a histologically confirmed diagnosis of oral NHL were included. Demographic data and clinical parameters were digitally recorded, focusing on the NHL-specific localization and symptomatology. The study sample was evaluated by analyzing descriptive statistics with absolute and relative frequencies. A total of 26 patients with intraoral NHL were identified with a progressive increase in NHL occurrence during the observation period. Clinical manifestations included swelling/mass (80.7%), eventually associated with pain and ulcerations. The most common localizations were in soft tissues: buccal mucosa (38.4%), tongue (19.2%), gingiva (11.5%), cheek (11.5%). Oral NHL is rare. Clinical manifestations were unspecific, so a misdiagnosis could occur. The extranodal B-cell form of oral NHL, particularly diffuse large B-cell lymphoma, was the most common frequent oral NHL in this southern Italian population, with a progressively increased occurrence in almost 20 years. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Oral Oncology)
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13 pages, 482 KiB  
Article
Genome of Helicobacter pylori and Serotype of HPV Detected in Oropharyngeal and Laryngeal Cancer and Chronic Inflammation Patients
by Jaromír Astl, Richard Holy, Eva Maute, Jan Rotnágl, David Kalfeřt, Barbora Drnková, Temoore Younus and Emil Pavlík
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(18), 9545; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18189545 - 10 Sep 2021
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 2225
Abstract
Objective: Oropharyngeal/laryngeal carcinoma are common cancers of the upper aerodigestive system. Human papillomavirus (HPV) is described as the most frequent in the cancer of unknown primary. The presence of Helicobacter pylori (HP) in the oral cavity is discussed in some papers. The aim [...] Read more.
Objective: Oropharyngeal/laryngeal carcinoma are common cancers of the upper aerodigestive system. Human papillomavirus (HPV) is described as the most frequent in the cancer of unknown primary. The presence of Helicobacter pylori (HP) in the oral cavity is discussed in some papers. The aim of study: To analyze the incidence of HPV and HP in oropharyngeal/laryngeal cancer persons versus persons with chronic tonsillar inflammation and healthy persons. Methods: The samples were taken in three groups: (1) tissue of oropharynx/larynx cancer (103 specimens); (2) tissue of palatine tonsils (85 specimens); and (3) healthy control group (50 specimens). We analyzed the presence of HP (PCR) and HPV genomic DNA (Sacace HPV High-Risk Screen Real-TM Quant) in the samples. Results: HP was detected in 86 samples (83.5%) and high-risk HPV in 62 samples (60.2%). We found a very high incidence of HP. In the cancer group, HP was detected in 82.5% cases and HPV positivity in 57.8%. In total, 7.2% of the cancer patients were negative for HP and HPV together. In turn, 53.6% of the cancer patients were positive for HP and HPV together. Four cases (4.2%) were positive for HPV only. VacA positivity was detected in 82 (79.6%) of the cancer cases and VacA negativity in 21 (20.4%) if the cancer cases. The incidence of HP in chronic inflammation (n = 85) was 65 cases (76.5%) and the incidence of HPV was 38 cases (44.7%). VacA positivity was detected in 59 (69.4%) of the chronic inflammation cases and VacA negativity was found in 26 (30.6%) of the chronic inflammation cases. Regarding the control group, we found HP positivity in 5 cases (11.1%) and HPV positivity in 19 cases (42.2%). There was VacA positivity in 6 cases (50.0%) of the control group. Statistically significantly lower prevalence of HP (p < 0.001) and HPV (p = 0.006) was found in the control group. Conclusions: We suggest that the palatine tonsils are colonized by HP. In our study, HP was present in oropharyngeal cancer in more cases in comparison with HPV infection. The presence of VacA from HP can have an influence on the human epithelial and immune cells’ regulation ways. Our results do not support idea that the CagA-positive HP is a primary carcinogen in oropharyngeal area. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Oral Oncology)
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12 pages, 1278 KiB  
Article
Mouthwash Use and the Risk of Oral, Pharyngeal, and Laryngeal Cancer. A Meta-Analysis
by Sorin Hostiuc, Ioana Victoria Ionescu and Eduard Drima
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(15), 8215; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18158215 - 3 Aug 2021
Cited by 6 | Viewed by 3388
Abstract
Objective: The main aim of this study was to test whether the use of mouthwash is associated with subtypes of squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (SCCHN) and to test the potential risk of SCCHN depending on the mouthwash use duration, [...] Read more.
Objective: The main aim of this study was to test whether the use of mouthwash is associated with subtypes of squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (SCCHN) and to test the potential risk of SCCHN depending on the mouthwash use duration, frequency, or alcoholic content. Materials and methods: We performed a meta-analysis using Web of Science and Scopus databases to detect the risk change associated with mouthwash use depending on the alcohol content, duration and frequency of use, and anatomical location. We used a random-effects model with the Sidik–Jonkman estimator for effect size model measures. Results: We included 17 studies in the meta-analysis containing 17,085 cases and 20,032 controls. The risk difference for SCCHN between mouthwash users and non-users was minimal, with a value of −0.02 [−0.05, 0.01]. Alcoholic mouthwash use was associated with a minimal decrease in risk (of −0.01 [−0.07, 0.05]). Frequent usage of mouthwash was associated with a statistically significant risk increase for SCCHN but the risk increase was marginal (0.04, [0.01, 0.06]). Conclusions: Overall, our study failed to show a statistically significant correlation between mouthwash use and the risk of SCCHN. The only statistically significant correlation that we could identify was between frequent usage and SCCHN, potentially caused by prolonged contact between some constituents of mouthwash (possibly alcohol) and the oral epithelium. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Oral Oncology)
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15 pages, 1159 KiB  
Systematic Review
Diagnostic Accuracy of Confocal Laser Endomicroscopy for the Diagnosis of Oral Squamous Cell Carcinoma: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis
by Sneha Sethi, Xiangqun Ju, Richard M. Logan, Paul Sambrook, Robert A. McLaughlin and Lisa M. Jamieson
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(23), 12390; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph182312390 - 25 Nov 2021
Cited by 5 | Viewed by 2226
Abstract
Background: Advances in treatment approaches for patients with oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) have been unsuccessful in preventing frequent recurrences and distant metastases, leading to a poor prognosis. Early detection and prevention enable an improved 5-year survival and better prognosis. Confocal Laser Endomicroscopy [...] Read more.
Background: Advances in treatment approaches for patients with oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) have been unsuccessful in preventing frequent recurrences and distant metastases, leading to a poor prognosis. Early detection and prevention enable an improved 5-year survival and better prognosis. Confocal Laser Endomicroscopy (CLE) is a non-invasive imaging instrument that could enable an earlier diagnosis and possibly help in reducing unnecessary invasive surgical procedures. Objective: To present an up to date systematic review and meta-analysis assessing the diagnostic accuracy of CLE in diagnosing OSCC. Materials and Methods. PubMed, Scopus, and Web of Science databases were explored up to 30 June 2021, to collect articles concerning the diagnosis of OSCC through CLE. Screening: data extraction and appraisal was done by two reviewers. The quality of the methodology followed by the studies included in this review was assessed using the Quality Assessment of Diagnostic Accuracy Studies-2 (QUADAS-2) tool. A random effects model was used for the meta-analysis. Results: Six studies were included, leading to a total number of 361 lesions in 213 patients. The pooled sensitivity and specificity were 95% (95% CI, 92–97%; I2 = 77.5%) and 93% (95% CI, 90–95%; I2 = 68.6%); the pooled positive likelihood ratios and negative likelihood ratios were 10.85 (95% CI, 5.4–21.7; I2 = 55.9%) and 0.08 (95% CI, 0.03–0.2; I2 = 83.5%); and the pooled diagnostic odds ratio was 174.45 (95% CI, 34.51–881.69; I2 = 73.6%). Although risk of bias and heterogeneity is observed, this study validates that CLE may have a noteworthy clinical influence on the diagnosis of OSCC, through its high sensitivity and specificity. Conclusions: This review indicates an exceptionally high sensitivity and specificity of CLE for diagnosing OSCC. Whilst it is a promising diagnostic instrument, the limited number of existing studies and potential risk of bias of included studies does not allow us to draw firm conclusions. A conclusive inference can be drawn when more studies, possibly with homogeneous methodological approach, are performed. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Oral Oncology)
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