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Natural Disasters and Climate Change

A special issue of International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health (ISSN 1660-4601). This special issue belongs to the section "Climate Change".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (1 March 2023) | Viewed by 6000

Special Issue Editor

School of Social Sciences and the Asian School of the Environment, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore 639798, Singapore
Interests: environmental sociology; international development; food and global aquaculture
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

In recent decades, climate change is widely understood as a primary influence on the severity and frequency of natural disasters. According to the World Food Program (WFP 2011), between 1980 and 2006, the number of climate-related disasters has quadrupled, and the number of people affected by climate-related disasters has exceeded three hundred million per year, mostly in poor countries. Through global warming, climate change is expected to have unprecedented repercussions on the natural setting of the earth, such as sea level rise, seabed landslides, and changes in rainfall regimes, leading to floods and droughts. While some wealthy countries are largely responsible for a substantial part of global climate change, poor countries and poor people are largely bearing the brunt of it since they have little capacity to cope with and recover from disasters. This Special Issue invites theoretical, empirical, and review papers from social science perspective that deal with, among other related issues, the critical intersection between climate change and natural disasters, disaster management and recovery, and global climate and disaster politics.  

Dr. Md Saidul Islam
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2500 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • climate change
  • natural disasters
  • mitigation
  • adaptation
  • disaster management
  • double-risk society
  • resilience to climate change
  • disaster recovery
  • flood
  • cyclone

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

20 pages, 3658 KiB  
Article
Climate Change, Ecological Modernization, and Disaster Management: The Coastal Embankment Project in Southwestern Bangladesh
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2023, 20(12), 6086; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph20126086 - 08 Jun 2023
Viewed by 1647
Abstract
Climate change, one of the severest environmental threats to humankind, disproportionately affects low-income, developing countries in the Global South. Having no feasible mitigation alternatives, these countries resort to adaptation efforts to address climate perturbations. Climate change adaptation (or resilience) is primarily a localized [...] Read more.
Climate change, one of the severest environmental threats to humankind, disproportionately affects low-income, developing countries in the Global South. Having no feasible mitigation alternatives, these countries resort to adaptation efforts to address climate perturbations. Climate change adaptation (or resilience) is primarily a localized course of action that depends on individuals, social networks, economies, ecologies, political structures, and the capabilities of all those to work collectively to absorb, learn from, and transform in the face of new realities. With a view to controlling the floods that shattered the life and economy of the then East Pakistan, which is now Bangladesh, during the mid-twentieth century, the coastal embankment project (CEP) was instituted as an adaptation strategy to natural disasters in Southwestern Bangladesh. Based on a qualitative analysis of primary and secondary data, this paper seeks to critically evaluate the efficacy of the CEP in terms of the space for feasible action and ecological modernization. The findings of this research indicate that the CEP has become an unrealistic venture that hinders the growing economic activity of shrimp aquaculture in the area. This paper is expected to contribute to generating further theoretical and empirical discourse on the evaluation of similar development projects around the globe. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Natural Disasters and Climate Change)
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20 pages, 629 KiB  
Article
New Conceptual Model of Social Sustainability: Review from Past Concepts and Ideas
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2023, 20(7), 5350; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph20075350 - 31 Mar 2023
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 2691
Abstract
The social dimension of sustainability has remained relatively underdefined, despite the efforts to specify and integrate this dimension into the general sustainability conversation of scholars and practitioners. This study aims to advance the conversation of social sustainability by examining past the multi-disciplinary literature [...] Read more.
The social dimension of sustainability has remained relatively underdefined, despite the efforts to specify and integrate this dimension into the general sustainability conversation of scholars and practitioners. This study aims to advance the conversation of social sustainability by examining past the multi-disciplinary literature and policy documents, as well as proposing a comprehensive conceptual model of social sustainability. We present a model with five dimensions: safety and security, equity, adaptability, social inclusion and cohesion, and quality of life. Through these dimensions, we propose social sustainability as a process that strives for effective management and allocation of social capital as a constitutive resource, and the confrontation of such controllable and uncontrollable risks as natural disasters and climate change. Our model was constructed with the purpose of providing scholars, policymakers, and practitioners with a comprehensive guideline to create social sustainability policy with human beings as the priority and cultural awareness as a grounding approach to initiating disaster-related and climate-change resilience. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Natural Disasters and Climate Change)
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27 pages, 7897 KiB  
Article
The Risk of Extreme Streamflow Drought in the Polish Carpathians—A Two-Dimensional Approach
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2022, 19(21), 14095; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph192114095 - 28 Oct 2022
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 1056
Abstract
Poland has relatively small water resources compared to other European countries. Droughts are a characteristic feature of the Polish climate; however, recent years have been particularly warm, causing longer and more severe droughts, including streamflow droughts. The most unfavourable streamflow droughts, considering the [...] Read more.
Poland has relatively small water resources compared to other European countries. Droughts are a characteristic feature of the Polish climate; however, recent years have been particularly warm, causing longer and more severe droughts, including streamflow droughts. The most unfavourable streamflow droughts, considering the economic or social (including health-related) consequences, are the longest and/or the ones with the largest volumes. Such prolonged and severe droughts may constitute a natural disaster threatening public health. The main aim of this article was to define the spatial variability of the annual maximum streamflow drought in the Polish Carpathians and the risk of the maximum streamflow drought of a duration and volume exceeding the given value occurring in this region. This was conducted based on a 30-year time series of daily flows in selected gauging cross sections on rivers in the Polish Carpathians. One- and-two-dimensional probability distributions (utilising a copula function) of the two most important maximum streamflow drought characteristics were identified, specifically duration and volume, which, in consequence, led to identifying the maximum streamflow droughts of a given return period (a given risk level). Maps of maximum streamflow drought hazard were developed and understood as spatial distributions of the maximum streamflow drought frequency of duration and volume exceeding the annual given values. Analysis of the maps allowed for the selection of areas/basins being more or less at risk of extreme annual streamflow drought of a duration and/or volume exceeding the given value. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Natural Disasters and Climate Change)
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