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Musculoskeletal System in Exercise and Rehabilitation: From Lab to Clinical Practice

A special issue of International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health (ISSN 1660-4601).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (29 February 2024) | Viewed by 9128

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Department of Basic Sciences, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, Universitat Internacional de Catalunya, 08195 Barcelona, Spain
Interests: anatomy; rehabilitation; sport; older people
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, Universitat Internacional de Catalunya (UIC-Barcelona), C/Josep Trueta s/n, 08017 Sant Cugat del Vallès, Spain
Interests: ultrasonography; physiotherapy; rehabilitation; physical therapy
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Basic Sciences, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, Universitat Internacional de Catalunya, 08195 Barcelona, Spain
Interests: physiotherapy; dry needling; ultrasound; anatomy electromyography; manual therapy
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The World Health Organization estimates that approximately 1.71 billion people suffer with musculoskeletal conditions worldwide. These conditions are typically characterized by pain and limitations in mobility, reducing people’s ability to work. As a result of this, musculoskeletal dysfunctions are the most common reason for referrals to medical health services. In the sports field, the musculoskeletal system plays an essential role in sporting performance. Improvements in strength and flexibility, or changes in neuromuscular parameters (such as stiffness, root mean square or strength), could be vital in improving sports performance or in preventing injuries.

This Special Issue, to be published in the International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health (IJERPH), focuses on studying all the components of the musculoskeletal system (muscle, fascia, tendon, etc.), and how these structures are modified when movement or rehabilitation is applied. The methodology of the projects can range from observational studies to randomized clinical trials. While the samples analyzed can be anatomical or histological, or from patients or athletes. 

Prof. Dr. Albert Pérez-Bellmunt
Prof. Dr. Carlos López-de-Celis
Prof. Dr. Jacobo Rodríguez-Sanz
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2500 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • muscle
  • musculoskeletal
  • fascia
  • tendon
  • nerve
  • sport
  • physical therapy
  • anatomy
  • manual therapy

Published Papers (4 papers)

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18 pages, 3004 KiB  
Article
The Influence of Hip and Knee Joint Angles on Quadriceps Muscle-Tendon Unit Properties during Maximal Voluntary Isometric Contraction
by Alessandra Martins Melo de Sousa, Jonathan Galvão Tenório Cavalcante, Martim Bottaro, Denis César Leite Vieira, Nicolas Babault, Jeam Marcel Geremia, Patrick Corrigan, Karin Grävare Silbernagel, João Luiz Quaglioti Durigan and Rita de Cássia Marqueti
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2023, 20(5), 3947; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph20053947 - 23 Feb 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 2102
Abstract
Determining how the quadriceps femoris musculotendinous unit functions, according to hip and knee joint angles, may help with clinical decisions when prescribing knee extension exercises. We aimed to determine the effect of hip and knee joint angles on structure and neuromuscular functioning of [...] Read more.
Determining how the quadriceps femoris musculotendinous unit functions, according to hip and knee joint angles, may help with clinical decisions when prescribing knee extension exercises. We aimed to determine the effect of hip and knee joint angles on structure and neuromuscular functioning of all constituents of the quadriceps femoris and patellar tendon properties. Twenty young males were evaluated in four positions: seated and supine in both 20° and 60° of knee flexion (SIT20, SIT60, SUP20, and SUP60). Peak knee extension torque was determined during maximal voluntary isometric contraction (MVIC). Ultrasound imaging was used at rest and during MVIC to characterize quadriceps femoris muscle and tendon aponeurosis complex stiffness. We found that peak torque and neuromuscular efficiency were higher for SUP60 and SIT60 compared to SUP20 and SIT20 position. We found higher fascicle length and lower pennation angle in positions with the knee flexed at 60°. The tendon aponeurosis complex stiffness, tendon force, stiffness, stress, and Young’s modulus seemed greater in more elongated positions (60°) than in shortened positions (20°). In conclusion, clinicians should consider positioning at 60° of knee flexion rather than 20°, regardless if seated or supine, during rehabilitation to load the musculotendinous unit enough to stimulate a cellular response. Full article
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21 pages, 5736 KiB  
Article
Personal, Academic Stressors and Environmental Factors Contributing to Musculoskeletal Pain among Undergraduates Due to Online Learning: A Mixed Method Study with Data Integration
by Deepashini Harithasan, Devinder Kaur Ajit Singh, Nur Aqilah Binti Abd Razak and Nadirah Binti Baharom
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2022, 19(21), 14513; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph192114513 - 4 Nov 2022
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 1947
Abstract
Aim: The COVID-19 pandemic has led to adaptation in teaching and learning methods. There is a possibility that this shift from the classroom to online learning will persist post-pandemic with implications to all involved. We explored the contribution of personal, academic stressors and [...] Read more.
Aim: The COVID-19 pandemic has led to adaptation in teaching and learning methods. There is a possibility that this shift from the classroom to online learning will persist post-pandemic with implications to all involved. We explored the contribution of personal, academic stressors and environmental factors contributing to musculoskeletal pain among undergraduates due to online learning by integrating data from an online survey and one-to-one in-depth interviews. The association between musculoskeletal pain, personal, academic stressors and environmental factors among undergraduates due to online learning was also investigated. Methods: Both quantitative and qualitative methods were used. A questionnaire was completed by 179 undergraduates (34 males and 145 females) aged between 18 to 25 years old. This was followed by an online, in-depth, one-to-one interview among 10 female undergraduates who reported severe musculoskeletal pain. The two sets of findings were integrated using a triangulation protocol. Result: The three most common musculoskeletal pains experienced by undergraduates due to online learning were low back (73.2%), followed by neck (68.7%) and shoulder (58.7%) pain. The six main themes identified from the interviews were: (1) Musculoskeletal pain characteristics; (2) academic issues; (3) difficulties faced by undergraduates due to teaching and learning; (4) emotions towards work/study; (5) work environment; and (6) time spent working at a workstation. Upper back pain was identified to be associated with personal (p < 0.05) and most environmental factors (p < 0.05). From the triangulation model, it was shown that personal, academic stressors and environmental factors were mainly from the workstation, uncomfortable environment, working posture and time spent at the workstation, which all contributed to musculoskeletal pain. Conclusions: This study showed that exercise, academic stressors, and environmental factors were associated with musculoskeletal pain among undergraduates due to online teaching and learning sessions. There may be a need to integrate an online prevention of musculoskeletal pain education package based on a biopsychosocial model with online teaching and learning for undergraduates. Full article
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9 pages, 1067 KiB  
Article
Variations in the Course and Diameter of the Suprascapular Nerve: Anatomical Study
by Marta Montané-Blanchart, Maribel Miguel-Pérez, Lourdes Rodero-de-Lamo, Ingrid Möller, Albert Pérez-Bellmunt and Carlo Martinoli
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2022, 19(12), 7065; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph19127065 - 9 Jun 2022
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1749
Abstract
(1) Background: Suprascapular neuropathy is an important factor contributing to shoulder pain. Given the prevalence of nerve injury and nerve block in the suprascapular notch region, as well as the frequency of arthroscopic procedures on the suprascapular notch, which are recommended in shoulder [...] Read more.
(1) Background: Suprascapular neuropathy is an important factor contributing to shoulder pain. Given the prevalence of nerve injury and nerve block in the suprascapular notch region, as well as the frequency of arthroscopic procedures on the suprascapular notch, which are recommended in shoulder pain management, its morphology is relevant from a clinical perspective. (2) Methods: Suprascapular nerve course was studied in twelve shoulders by dissection. Its diameter was measured at omohyoid level, proximal to the suprascapular notch and distal to the spinoglenoid notch. A multi-vari chart was used in order to descriptively visualize the results. The variations found were analyzed with a mixed linear model. (3) Results: In two of the six subjects, the suprascapular nerve was divided into two motor branches proximal to the superior transverse scapular ligament. An increase in diameter around the suprascapular notch was detected, with an estimated difference between diameter means of 2.008 mm at the suprascapular notch level and 2.047 mm at the spinoglenoid notch level. (4) Conclusions: A difference in the estimated diameter detected and the fact that the motor branches, which innervate supraspinatus and infraspinatus muscle, were divided proximal to the suprascapular notch may be relevant in the diagnosis and treatment of suprascapular neuropathy and arthroscopic procedures. Full article
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9 pages, 1145 KiB  
Brief Report
The Effect of Neurodynamic Techniques on the Dispersion of Intraneural Edema: A Systematic Review with Meta-Analysis
by Sergio Nuñez de Arenas-Arroyo, Vicente Martínez-Vizcaíno, Iván Cavero-Redondo, Celia Álvarez-Bueno, Sara Reina-Gutierrez and Ana Torres-Costoso
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2022, 19(21), 14472; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph192114472 - 4 Nov 2022
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 2426
Abstract
Background: There is evidence for the positive effects of neurodynamic techniques in some peripheral entrapment neuropathies, but the rationale for these effects has not been validated. We aimed to estimate the direct effect of neurodynamic techniques on the dispersion of artificially induced intraneural [...] Read more.
Background: There is evidence for the positive effects of neurodynamic techniques in some peripheral entrapment neuropathies, but the rationale for these effects has not been validated. We aimed to estimate the direct effect of neurodynamic techniques on the dispersion of artificially induced intraneural edema measured by dye spread in cadavers. Methods: We systematically searched the MEDLINE, WOS, Scopus, and the Cochrane databases from inception to February 2020 for experimental studies addressing the efficacy of neurodynamic techniques on the dispersion of artificially induced intraneural edema. The DerSimonian and Laird method was used to compute pooled estimates of the mean differences (MDs) and its respective 95% confidence intervals (CIs). Subgroup analyses were conducted according to the type of neurodynamic technique. In addition, a 95% prediction interval was calculated to reflect the variation in true treatment effects in different settings, including the effect to be expected in future patients. Results: Pooled results showed a significant increase in fluid dispersion (MD = 2.57 mm; 95%CI: 1.13 to 4.01). Subgroup analysis showed increased dye spread in the tensioning techniques group (MD = 2.22 mm; 95%CI: 0.86 to 3.57). Conclusion: Neurodynamic techniques improved the intraneural edema dispersion and should be considered for the management of peripheral compression neuropathies. Furthermore, tensioning techniques appear to be effective in helping to disperse intraneural edema. Full article
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