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Maternal and Child Health: Prenatal Diagnosis, Pregnancy Complications and Post-partum Care

A special issue of International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health (ISSN 1660-4601).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 July 2024 | Viewed by 1495

Special Issue Editor

Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Medical University of Silesia, 41-703 Ruda Slaska, Poland
Interests: perinatology; prenatal diagnosis and therapy; preeclampsia; fetal growth restriction

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

A Special Issue in the International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health will be devoted to problems relating to Maternal and Child Health: Prenatal Diagnosis and Post-partum Care. I hope that the wide range of topics and areas of knowledge that this covers will allow me to collect very interesting reports in this field.

For many years, we have been observing the optimization of perinatal care that takes into account the mother, the fetus and the newborn. The upcoming Special Issue in the International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health will be enhanced by research that pays attention to serious pathologies of pregnancy, such as gestational hypertension with preeclampsia, gestational diabetes, diagnostics of fetal defects and the management of emergencies in pregnancy and puerperium, as well as researchers sharing their own experiences in this field.

Dr. Bartosz Czuba
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2500 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • pregnancy complications
  • prenatal diagnosis
  • fatal malformations
  • pregnancy problems and puerperal complications

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

11 pages, 658 KiB  
Article
Birth Weight < 3rd Percentile Prediction Using Additional Biochemical Markers—The Uric Acid Level and Angiogenesis Markers (sFlt-1, PlGF)—An Exploratory Study
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2022, 19(22), 15059; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph192215059 - 16 Nov 2022
Viewed by 1007
Abstract
(1) Aim: Ultrasound is the gold standard for assessing fetal growth disorders. The relationship between high sFlt-1/PlGF scores and LBW (low birth weight) was described. In this study, we attempted to assess whether uric acid could be used as a secondary marker in [...] Read more.
(1) Aim: Ultrasound is the gold standard for assessing fetal growth disorders. The relationship between high sFlt-1/PlGF scores and LBW (low birth weight) was described. In this study, we attempted to assess whether uric acid could be used as a secondary marker in estimating the pregnancy risk associated with LBW. (2) Material and methods: 665 pregnant women with a suspected or confirmed form of placental insufficiency were enrolled. In each of the patients, sFlt-1 and PlGF and uric acid levels were determined. Patients were divided into two groups according to birth weight below and above the third percentile for the given gestational age with the criteria of the neonatal definition of FGR (fetal growth restriction). (3) Results: A significant negative correlation between neonatal birth weight and the uric acid level across the entire study group was observed. We found a significant negative correlation between neonatal birth weight and the uric acid level with birth weights < 3rd percentile. (4) Conclusions: There is a significant link between the uric acid concentration and LBW in the group with placental insufficiency. Uric acid can improve the prediction of LBW. An algorithm for LBW prognosis that makes use of biophysical (ultrasound) and biochemical (uric acid level, angiogenesis markers) parameters yields better results than using these parameters separately from each other. Full article
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