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Recent Advances in Research on Air Pollution and Health Effects

A special issue of International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health (ISSN 1660-4601).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 June 2024 | Viewed by 4922

Special Issue Editors

Faculty of Geosciences and Civil Engineering, Institute of Science and Engineering, Kanazawa University, Kanazawa 920-1192, Japan
Interests: atmospheric environment; air pollution control technology; air cleaning devices; personal exposure
Faculty of Geosciences and Civil Engineering, Institute of Science and Engineering, Kanazawa University, Kanazawa 920-1192, Japan
Interests: aerosol; air pollution; biomass burning; carbon; emission inventory; forest fires; health risks; particulate matter; remote sensing; wildfire hazard
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals
Department of Radiology, Faculty of Medicine, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai 50200, Thailand
Interests: air pollution; biomass burning; biomarker of lung cancer; health risks; indoor radon exposure

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Air pollution has been one of the main environmental issues in the recent decade. The World Health Organization (WHO) reports that 99% of the world population is exposed to annual health-damaging particles with a diameter of 2.5 microns or less (≤PM2.5) levels over the WHO air quality guidelines of 5 μg·m−3. Exposure to PM as well as to ozone (O3), nitrogen dioxide (NO2), sulfur dioxide (SO2), micro- and nano plastics (MPs), and naturally radioactive elements (e.g., radon) pose  serious health risks for several populations. This air pollution is also associated with urbanization and rapid economic development. Recent advanced research in air pollution linked to human health will be essential to address the air pollution problem through the development of public health and environmental policies, considering the spatio-temporal variation of each pollutant. This Special Issue invites original studies, reviews, and perspective articles that aim to study air pollution and its health effects in advance. Subject areas may include, but are not limited to, the following:

  • Sub-microns and nano-particles linked to health risks;
  • Gaseous pollutants and radioactive related health effects;
  • Atmospheric micro- and nano-plastics and human health;
  • Physical, optical, and chemical characteristics of air pollutants;
  • Trans-boundary air pollution on air quality and human health;
  • Long-term and short-term effects from exposure to air pollutants;
  • Multipollutant exposures and changes in environnemental conditions;
  • Measurement techniques, instruments, and modeling in air pollution;
  • Influence of meteorological conditions on air quality and human health;
  • Data sciences, machine learning, and artificial intelligence of air pollutants.

Prof. Dr. Masami Furuuchi
Dr. Worradorn Phairuang
Dr. Narongchai Autsavapromporn
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2500 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • air monitoring
  • Artificial Intelligence (AI)
  • atmospheric microplastics
  • atmospheric modeling
  • atmospheric nanoparticles
  • biomass burning
  • gaseous pollutants
  • health risks
  • machine learning
  • ultrafine particles

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

18 pages, 2488 KiB  
Article
Investigation of the Exposure of Schoolchildren to Ultrafine Particles (PM0.1) during the COVID-19 Pandemic in a Medium-Sized City in Indonesia
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2023, 20(4), 2947; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph20042947 - 08 Feb 2023
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 2038
Abstract
The health risk of schoolchildren who were exposed to airborne fine and ultrafine particles (PM0.1) during the COVID-19 pandemic in the Jambi City (a medium-sized city in Sumatra Island), Indonesia was examined. A questionnaire survey was used to collect information on [...] Read more.
The health risk of schoolchildren who were exposed to airborne fine and ultrafine particles (PM0.1) during the COVID-19 pandemic in the Jambi City (a medium-sized city in Sumatra Island), Indonesia was examined. A questionnaire survey was used to collect information on schoolchildren from selected schools and involved information on personal profiles; living conditions; daily activities and health status. Size-segregated ambient particulate matter (PM) in school environments was collected over a period of 24 h on weekdays and the weekend. The personal exposure of PM of eight selected schoolchildren from five schools was evaluated for a 12-h period during the daytime using a personal air sampler for PM0.1 particles. The schoolchildren spent their time mostly indoors (~88%), while the remaining ~12% was spent in traveling and outdoor activities. The average exposure level was 1.5~7.6 times higher than the outdoor level and it was particularly high for the PM0.1 fraction (4.8~7.6 times). Cooking was shown to be a key parameter that explains such a large increase in the exposure level. The PM0.1 had the largest total respiratory deposition doses (RDDs), particularly during light exercise. The high level of PM0.1 exposure by indoor sources potentially associated with health risks was shown to be important. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Recent Advances in Research on Air Pollution and Health Effects)
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16 pages, 2080 KiB  
Article
Characteristics and Risk Assessment of Environmentally Persistent Free Radicals (EPFRs) of PM2.5 in Lahore, Pakistan
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2023, 20(3), 2384; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph20032384 - 29 Jan 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1803
Abstract
Environmentally persistent free radicals (EPFRs) are an emerging pollutant and source of oxidative stress. Samples of PM2.5 were collected at the urban sites of Lahore in both winter and summertime of 2019. The chemical composition of PM2.5, EPRF concentration, OH [...] Read more.
Environmentally persistent free radicals (EPFRs) are an emerging pollutant and source of oxidative stress. Samples of PM2.5 were collected at the urban sites of Lahore in both winter and summertime of 2019. The chemical composition of PM2.5, EPRF concentration, OH radical generation, and risk assessment of EPFRs in PM2.5 were evaluated. The average concentration of PM2.5 in wintertime and summertime in Lahore is 15 and 4.6 times higher than the national environmental quality standards (NEQS) of Pakistan and WHO. The dominant components of PM2.5 are carbonaceous species. The concentration of EPFRs and reactive oxygen species (ROS), such as OH radicals, is higher in the winter than in the summertime. The secondary inorganic ions do not contribute to the generation of OH radicals, although the contribution of SO42+, NO3, and NH4+ to the mass concentration of PM2.5 is greater in summertime. The atmospheric EPFRs are used to evaluate the exposure risk. The EPFRs in PM2.5 and cigarette smoke have shown similar toxicity to humans. In winter and summer, the residents of Lahore inhaled the amount of EPFRs equivalent to 4.0 and 0.6 cigarettes per person per day, respectively. Compared to Joaquin County, USA, the residents of Lahore are 1.8 to 14.5 times more exposed to EPFRs in summer and wintertime. The correlation analysis of atmospheric EPFRs (spin/m3) and carbonaceous species of PM2.5 indicates that coal combustion, biomass burning, and vehicle emissions are the possible sources of EPFRs in the winter and summertime. In both winter and summertime, metallic and carbonaceous species correlated well with OH radical generation, suggesting that vehicular emissions, coal combustion, and industrial emissions contributed to the OH radical generation. The study’s findings provide valuable information and data for evaluating the potential health effects of EPFRs in South Asia and implementing effective air pollution control strategies. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Recent Advances in Research on Air Pollution and Health Effects)
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