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Promoting Geriatric Care: Comprehensive Geriatric Assessment, Frailty and Resilience

A special issue of International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health (ISSN 1660-4601). This special issue belongs to the section "Aging".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 October 2023) | Viewed by 6982

Special Issue Editor


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Guest Editor
Third Faculty of Medicine, Charles University, Prague 100 00, Czech Republic
Interests: geriatrics; comprehensive geriatric assessment; cognitive impairment; frailty

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

A special issue entitled Promoting Geriatric Care, in the International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, is being organized.

Geriatrics is a growing and flourishing field of medicine.  Considering the population ageing, knowledge supporting the quality of geriatric care is essential. Comprehensive geriatric assessment (CGA) is considered one of the fundamental geriatric competencies.  How is CGA incorporated in successful services for geriatric patients and innovative models of care? What do we know about frailty and resilience, and how can this be used for real-life geriatric patients? How can bridging different fields of medicine and combining geriatric and other medical competencies contribute to the best outcomes for older patients?

This Special Issue is dedicated to the subject area of geriatrics, reflecting the importance of functional status of geriatric population for public health. For detailed information on the journal, please see https://www.mdpi.com/journal/ijerph. The keywords listed below provide an outline of some of the possible areas of interest.

Dr. Hana Vaňková
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2500 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • functional status
  • healthcare outcomes
  • comprehensive geriatric assessment
  • epidemiology of geriatric syndromes
  • resilience and frailty
  • sarcopenia, depression, cognitive impairment, delirium
  • biology of ageing and functional status
  • prevention of functional decline
  • interprofessional cooperation focused on geriatric patient
  • geriatric out-patient care
  • family caregivers and volunteers in geriatric care
  • innovative geriatric services

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

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9 pages, 642 KiB  
Article
Association between Muscle Fatigability, Self-Perceived Fatigue and C-Reactive Protein at Admission in Hospitalized Geriatric Patients
by Carmen Hoekstra, Myrthe Swart, Ivan Bautmans, René Melis and Geeske Peeters
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2023, 20(16), 6582; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph20166582 - 16 Aug 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1209
Abstract
Background: The capacity to perceived vitality (CPV) ratio is a novel measure for intrinsic capacity or resilience based on grip work and self-perceived fatigue. CPV has been associated with pre-frailty in older adults and post-surgery inflammation in adults. To better understand the utility [...] Read more.
Background: The capacity to perceived vitality (CPV) ratio is a novel measure for intrinsic capacity or resilience based on grip work and self-perceived fatigue. CPV has been associated with pre-frailty in older adults and post-surgery inflammation in adults. To better understand the utility of this measure in a frail population, we examined the association between CPV and inflammation in geriatric inpatients. Methods: Data were obtained from 104 hospitalized geriatric patients. The average age of participants was 83.3 ± 7.5 years, and 55.8% of participants were women. In the cross-sectional analyses, associations between C-reactive protein (CRP), grip work (GW), self-perceived fatigue (SPF) and the CPV ratio (higher values indicate better capacity) were examined using linear regression adjusted for confounders. Results: The adjusted association between CRP (abnormal vs. normal) and the CPV ratio was not statistically significant (B = −0.33, 95% CI = −4.00 to 3.34). Associations between CRP and GW (B = 25.53, 95% CI = −478.23 to 529.30) and SPF (B = 0.57, 95% CI = −0.64 to 1.77) were also not statistically significant. Similar results were found in unadjusted models and analyses of cases with complete data. Conclusions: In this frail group of geriatric inpatients, inflammation, routinely assessed with CRP, was not associated with CPV or its components, GW and SPF. Further research is needed to explore whether CPV is a useful indicator of frailty or recovery capacity in hospitalized geriatric patients. Full article
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12 pages, 1369 KiB  
Article
Intensive Rehabilitation Program in Older Adults with Stroke: Therapy Content and Feasibility—Preliminary Results from the BRAIN-CONNECTS Study
by Andrea Morgado-Pérez, Maria Coll-Molinos, Ruben Valero, Miriam Llobet, Nohora Rueda, Andrea Martínez, Sonia Nieto, Cindry Ramírez-Fuentes, Dolores Sánchez-Rodríguez, Ester Marco, Josep Puig and Esther Duarte
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2023, 20(6), 4696; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph20064696 - 07 Mar 2023
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Abstract
The main objective was to assess the feasibility of an intensive rehabilitation program (IRP) for stroke patients; and secondly, to detect eventual age-related differences in content, duration, tolerability, and safety in a prospective observational cohort of patients diagnosed with subacute stroke, admitted to [...] Read more.
The main objective was to assess the feasibility of an intensive rehabilitation program (IRP) for stroke patients; and secondly, to detect eventual age-related differences in content, duration, tolerability, and safety in a prospective observational cohort of patients diagnosed with subacute stroke, admitted to inpatient rehabilitation (BRAIN-CONNECTS project). Activities during physical, occupational and speech therapy, and time dedicated to each one were recorded. Forty-five subjects (63.0 years, 77.8% men) were included. The mean time of therapy was 173.8 (SD 31.5) minutes per day. The only age-related differences when comparing patients ≥65 and <65 years were a shorter time allocated for occupational therapy (−7.5 min (95% CI −12.5 to −2.6), p = 0.004) and a greater need of speech therapy (90% vs. 44%) in the older adults. Gait training, movement patterns of upper limbs, and lingual praxis were the most commonly performed activities. Regarding tolerability and safety, there were no losses to follow-up, and the attendance ratio was above 95%. No adverse events occurred during any session in all patients. Conclusion: IRP is a feasible intervention in patients with subacute stroke, regardless of age, and there are no relevant differences on content or duration of therapy. Full article
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14 pages, 4189 KiB  
Article
Musculoskeletal Ultrasound Shows Muscle Mass Changes during Post-Acute Care Hospitalization in Older Men: A Prospective Cohort Study
by Delky Meza-Valderrama, Ester Marco, Elena Muñoz-Redondo, Andrea Morgado-Pérez, Marta Tejero Sánchez, Yulibeth Curbelo Peña, Elisabeth De Jaime, Lizzeth Canchucaja, Frank Meza Concepción, Stany Perkisas and Dolores Sánchez-Rodríguez
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2022, 19(22), 15150; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph192215150 - 17 Nov 2022
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 1794
Abstract
This study aimed to prospectively assess changes in muscle thickness (MT) and the cross-sectional area (CSA) of the rectus femoris (RF) muscle in a cohort of older adults, using musculoskeletal ultrasound at admission and at a 2-week follow-up during hospitalization in a post-acute [...] Read more.
This study aimed to prospectively assess changes in muscle thickness (MT) and the cross-sectional area (CSA) of the rectus femoris (RF) muscle in a cohort of older adults, using musculoskeletal ultrasound at admission and at a 2-week follow-up during hospitalization in a post-acute care unit. Differences in frailty status and correlations of MT-RF and CSA-RF with current sarcopenia diagnostic criteria were also studied. Forty adults aged 79.5 (SD 9.5) years (57.5% women) participated, including 14 with frailty and 26 with pre-frailty. In the first week follow-up, men had a significant increase in MT (0.9 mm [95%CI 0.3 to 1.4], p = 0.003) and CSA (0.4 cm2 [95%CI 0.1 to 0.6], p = 0.007). During the second week, men continued to have a significant increase in MT (0.7 mm [95%CI 0.0 to 1.4], p = 0.036) and CSA (0.6 cm2 [95%CI 0.01 to 1.2], p = 0.048). Patients with frailty had lower values of MT-RF and CSA-RF at admission and during the hospitalization period. A moderate-to-good correlation of MT-RF and CSA with handgrip strength, fat-free mass and gait speed was observed. Musculoskeletal ultrasound was able to detect MT-RF and CSA-RF changes in older adults admitted to a post-acute care unit. Full article
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Review

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13 pages, 625 KiB  
Review
Association between Malnutrition Assessed by the Global Leadership Initiative on Malnutrition Criteria and Mortality in Older People: A Scoping Review
by Dolores Sánchez-Rodríguez, Dorien De Meester, Léa Minon, Marie Claessens, Neslian Gümüs, Siddhartha Lieten, Florence Benoit, Murielle Surquin and Ester Marco
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2023, 20(7), 5320; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph20075320 - 30 Mar 2023
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1795
Abstract
The Global Leadership Initiative on Malnutrition (GLIM) criteria were introduced in 2018 for the diagnosis of malnutrition in adults. This review was aimed at gathering the evidence about the association between malnutrition according to the GLIM criteria and mortality in older people, an [...] Read more.
The Global Leadership Initiative on Malnutrition (GLIM) criteria were introduced in 2018 for the diagnosis of malnutrition in adults. This review was aimed at gathering the evidence about the association between malnutrition according to the GLIM criteria and mortality in older people, an emerging and clinically meaningful topic in the implementation of the GLIM criteria in geriatric healthcare settings. This scoping review considered meta-analyses, systematic reviews, cohort studies, and cross-sectional studies published in PubMed, Scopus, and the Cochrane Database for Systematic Reviews from the development of the GLIM criteria in 2018 to January 2023. Seventeen articles (15 cohort and 2 cross-sectional studies) were included. The association between GLIM criteria and mortality had been assessed in hospitalized (11 over the 17 articles) and community-dwelling older populations, and those in nursing homes. The review found a strong association between malnutrition according to GLIM criteria and mortality in hospitalized (1.2-fold to 7-fold higher mortality) and community-dwelling older people (1.6-fold to 4-fold higher mortality). These findings highlight the prognostic value of the GLIM criteria and support strategies towards the implementation of malnutrition evaluation according to the GLIM, in order to optimize comprehensive geriatric assessment and provide older people with the highest quality of nutritional care. Studies in nursing home populations were very scarce and may be urgently required. Full article
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