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Physical Fitness and Exercise during and after the COVID-19 Pandemic

A special issue of International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health (ISSN 1660-4601). This special issue belongs to the section "Exercise and Health-Related Quality of Life".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 October 2024 | Viewed by 4575

Special Issue Editor

Department of Life Sciences, Brunel University, London UB8 3PH, UK
Interests: sport psychology; sport science; neuro-psychophysiology; music therapy
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The outbreak of the unprecedented COVID-19 pandemic ushered in a period of global turmoil and uncertainty. As the world grappled with the profound impact of the virus, it underscored humanity's collective vulnerability, shedding light on the fragility of our health and well-being. Of particular interest to scientists and researchers are the implications of the COVID-19 pandemic on various demographics, including students, athletes, high-performance competitors, and individuals with disabilities. The pandemic has posed unique challenges for maintaining physical fitness, adherence to exercise routines, and rehabilitation efforts in the face of lockdowns, restrictions, and disruptions to daily routines. This shift in focus towards understanding the impact of the pandemic on physical health and rehabilitation has become a cornerstone of scientific inquiry in the current landscape.

This Special Issue seeks to showcase the latest developments and insights from recent research on physical fitness and exercise during and after the COVID-19 pandemic. By delving into methodological and experimental studies, this Special Issue aims to provide a comprehensive overview of the evolving landscape of physical fitness, exercise interventions, and rehabilitation strategies in the context of the pandemic. Through a multidisciplinary lens, this Special Issue also aims to explore the resilience, adaptability, and innovative approaches employed to navigate the challenges posed by the ongoing global health crisis. As researchers continue to unravel the complexities of maintaining physical well-being in the midst of a pandemic, this Special Issue offers a platform to disseminate cutting-edge research, foster dialogue, and inspire novel approaches to promote physical fitness and exercise resilience in a post-pandemic world.

Dr. Garry Kuan
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2500 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

14 pages, 675 KiB  
Article
Impact of the COVID-19 Pandemic on Physical Activity among Mostly Older, Overweight Black Women Living in the Rural Alabama Black Belt
by Whitney N. Neal, Erica A. Schleicher, Kerri Baron, Robert A. Oster, Nashira I. Brown, Wendy Demark-Wahnefried, Maria Pisu, Monica L. Baskin, Kelsey B. Parrish, William Walker Cole, Mohanraj Thirumalai and Dori W. Pekmezi
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2023, 20(24), 7180; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph20247180 - 15 Dec 2023
Viewed by 2198
Abstract
Despite well-documented global declines in physical activity (PA) during the COVID-19 pandemic, little is known regarding the specific impact among underserved, rural Alabama counties. This is concerning as this region was already disproportionately burdened by inactivity and related chronic diseases and was among [...] Read more.
Despite well-documented global declines in physical activity (PA) during the COVID-19 pandemic, little is known regarding the specific impact among underserved, rural Alabama counties. This is concerning as this region was already disproportionately burdened by inactivity and related chronic diseases and was among the hardest hit by COVID-19. Thus, the current study examined the effect of COVID-19 on PA in four rural Alabama counties. An ancillary survey was administered between March 2020 and August 2021 to the first cohort (N = 171) of participants enrolled in a larger PA trial. Main outcomes of this survey included the perceived impact of COVID-19 on PA, leisure-time PA, and social cognitive theory (SCT) constructs at 3 months. Almost half of the participants reported being less active during the pandemic (49.7%) and endorsed that COVID-19 made PA more difficult (47.4%), citing concerns such as getting sick from exercising outside of the home (70.4%) and discomfort wearing a face mask while exercising (58%). Perceived COVID-19 impact on PA was significantly associated with education, household dependents, and gender (p’s < 0.05). More women, parents, and college graduates reported that the COVID-19 pandemic made PA more difficult. Overall, there were no significant associations between PA, SCT constructs, or perceived COVID-19 impact on PA scores at 3 months. While the pandemic made PA difficult for many participants, these barriers were not associated with leisure-time PA levels or related theoretical mechanisms of action, which bodes well for the success of our ongoing intervention efforts and the resiliency of these communities. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Physical Fitness and Exercise during and after the COVID-19 Pandemic)
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12 pages, 356 KiB  
Article
Sports and the Pandemic: The Impact of COVID-19 on Active Living and Life Satisfaction of Climbers
by David Jungwirth and Daniela Haluza
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2023, 20(3), 1964; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph20031964 - 20 Jan 2023
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1740
Abstract
The COVID-19 pandemic has resulted in significant changes in every aspect of our lives. Because of the measures imposed, people were only allowed to leave their homes for certain purposes, and all types of cultural and sports events were canceled. Climbers were greatly [...] Read more.
The COVID-19 pandemic has resulted in significant changes in every aspect of our lives. Because of the measures imposed, people were only allowed to leave their homes for certain purposes, and all types of cultural and sports events were canceled. Climbers were greatly affected by these limited options for regular physical activity outside of the home environment. Little is known about the crisis’ effects on the climbing community in German-speaking regions. Thus, we surveyed 1028 German-speaking climbers (mean age 34.6 years, SD 10.4; 50.4% females) from December 2020 to February 2021. A cross-sectional online survey collected data on climbing frequency and preferences as well as levels of life satisfaction, using the standardized Short Life Satisfaction Questionnaire for Lockdowns (SLSQL) before and during the crisis. Results showed that due to the pandemic, study subjects climbed less frequently, preferred outdoor locations to climb, and showed decreased life satisfaction scores (21%, (d = 0.87, p < 0.001). In conclusion, these findings highlighted that the COVID-19 pandemic had a negative effect on climbing sports activities and life satisfaction in this study sample. To preserve physical and mental health, indoor and outdoor sport activities should be continued as much as possible with reasonable hygiene concepts in place. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Physical Fitness and Exercise during and after the COVID-19 Pandemic)
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