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2nd Edition: Occupational & Environmental Health Risk Assessment

A special issue of International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health (ISSN 1660-4601). This special issue belongs to the section "Environmental Health".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 July 2023) | Viewed by 5482

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Department of Nano-Chemical, Biological and Environmental Engineering, Seokyeong University, Seoul 02173, Republic of Korea
Interests: environmental health, risk assessment, air pollution; environmental health surveillance system; exposure science; indoor air qulaity; environmental monitoring; environmental modeling
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals
Division of Environment and Sustainability, The Hong Kong University of Science and Technology, Clear Water Bay, Hong Kong, China
Interests: exposure characterization and management
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

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Guest Editor
College of Medicine, Gachon University, Incheon 21999, Republic of Korea
Interests: environmental health; epidemiology
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

We are organizing a Special Issue on "Occupational & Environmental Health Risk Assessment" in the journal IJERPH (ISSN: 1660-4601, IF: 4.614). A human health risk (HRA) assessment can be defined as the process used to estimate the nature and probability of adverse health effects in humans who may be exposed to hazardous agents, including chemicals in contaminated environmental media, at present or in the future. Accordingly, occupational and environmental health risk assessment has generated a number of important scientific discoveries resulting in successful preventive measures. The recent and rapid expansion of occupational and environmental health risk looks set to continue in line with growing public, governmental, and media concern about occupational and environmental health issues, and a scientific need to better understand and explain the effects of occupational and environmental pollutants on human health. New methods and approaches in relation to occupational and environmental health risk assessment have been required. Papers addressing this topic are invited for this Special Issue, especially those combining a high academic standard coupled with a practical focus on providing optimal health risk assessment solutions. 

Dr. Wonho Yang
Prof. Dr. Cheol Min Lee
Dr. Wenwei Che
Prof. Dr. Michael S. Breen
Dr. Yoon-Hyeong Choi
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2500 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • exposure and risk assessment
  • epidemiology
  • occupational health
  • environmental health

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

10 pages, 1336 KiB  
Article
Lip Seal Strength and Tongue Pressure among Japanese Male Workers: Comparison of Different Age Groups
by Akira Minoura, Yoshiaki Ihara, Hirotaka Kato, Kouzou Murakami, Yoshio Watanabe, Kojiro Hirano, Yoshinori Ito and Akatsuki Kokaze
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2023, 20(4), 2862; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph20042862 - 06 Feb 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1338
Abstract
Lip seal strength and tongue pressure are related to sarcopenia in older adults and are directly linked to the quality of life of workers after retirement. This study examined lip seal strength and tongue pressure among Japanese male workers by age. A self-administered [...] Read more.
Lip seal strength and tongue pressure are related to sarcopenia in older adults and are directly linked to the quality of life of workers after retirement. This study examined lip seal strength and tongue pressure among Japanese male workers by age. A self-administered questionnaire survey including alcohol consumption and smoking was conducted on 454 male workers. Height, weight, lip seal strength, and tongue pressure were also measured and then stratified by age (20s, 30s, 40s, 50s, and 60s and over). The mean (25th, 75th percentiles) lip seal strength and tongue pressure for all workers were 13.7 N (11.6, 16.4) and 41.7 kPa (35.2, 48.2), respectively. Both lip seal strength and tongue pressure were lowest in the 20s, at 12.1 N (9.6, 14.0) and 40.6 kPa (33.4, 47.6), respectively. The multiple regression analysis adjusted for smoking showed a significant positive association between lip seal strength and BMI for the 20s, 50s, and 60s and over, and a significant positive association between tongue pressure and BMI for the 30s, 40s, 50s, and 60s and over. To maintain oral health in older adults, it may be useful to measure workers’ lip seal strength and tongue pressure and intervene at an earlier stage. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue 2nd Edition: Occupational & Environmental Health Risk Assessment)
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10 pages, 523 KiB  
Article
Asbestos Exposure and Severity of COVID-19
by Galo Granados, María Sáez-López, Cristina Aljama, Júlia Sampol, María-Jesús Cruz, Jaume Ferrer and Se-COVID-19 Team
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2022, 19(23), 16305; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph192316305 - 06 Dec 2022
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1644
Abstract
Background: The aim of this study was to analyse the relationship between occupational exposure to asbestos and the severity of SARS-CoV-2 infection. Methods: We evaluated patients who survived admission in our centre for COVID-19 pneumonia. Demographic, analytical, and clinical variables were collected during [...] Read more.
Background: The aim of this study was to analyse the relationship between occupational exposure to asbestos and the severity of SARS-CoV-2 infection. Methods: We evaluated patients who survived admission in our centre for COVID-19 pneumonia. Demographic, analytical, and clinical variables were collected during admission. After discharge, a previously validated occupational exposure to asbestos questionnaire was administered. Spirometry, CO diffusion test, the 6-min walk test, and high-resolution chest CT were performed. Patients who required respiratory support (oxygen, CPAP, or NIV) were considered severe. Results: In total, 293 patients (mean age 54 + 13 years) were included. Occupational exposure to asbestos was detected in 67 (24%). Patients with occupational exposure to asbestos had a higher frequency of COVID-19 pneumonia requiring respiratory support (n = 52, 77.6%) than their unexposed peers (n = 139, 61.5%) (p = 0.015). Asbestos exposure was associated with COVID-19 severity in the univariate but not in the multivariate analysis. No differences were found regarding follow-up variables including spirometry and the DLCO diffusion, the 6-min walk test, and CT alterations. Conclusions: In hospitalised patients with COVID-19 pneumonia, those with occupational exposure to asbestos more frequently needed respiratory support. However, an independent association between asbestos exposure and COVID-19 severity could not be confirmed. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue 2nd Edition: Occupational & Environmental Health Risk Assessment)
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22 pages, 4458 KiB  
Article
Co-Benefit Assessment of Active Transportation in Delhi, Estimating the Willingness to Use Nonmotorized Mode and Near-Roadway-Avoided PM2.5 Exposure
by Tavoos Hassan Bhat, Hooman Farzaneh and Nishat Tasnim Toosty
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2022, 19(22), 14974; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph192214974 - 14 Nov 2022
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 2060
Abstract
This study aims to estimate the avoided mortalities and morbidities and related economic impacts due to adopting the nonmotorized transportation (NMT) policy in Delhi, India. To this aim, an integrated quantitative assessment framework is developed to estimate the expected environmental, health, and economic [...] Read more.
This study aims to estimate the avoided mortalities and morbidities and related economic impacts due to adopting the nonmotorized transportation (NMT) policy in Delhi, India. To this aim, an integrated quantitative assessment framework is developed to estimate the expected environmental, health, and economic co-benefits from replacing personal motorized transport with NMT in Delhi, taking into account the inhabitants’ willingness to use NMT (walking and cycling) mode. The willingness to accept NMT is estimated by conducting a cross-sectional survey in Delhi, which is further used to estimate the expected health benefits from both increased physical activity and near-roadway-avoided PM2.5 exposure in selected traffic areas in 11 major districts in Delhi. The value of a statistical life (VSL) and cost of illness methods are used to calculate the economic benefits of the avoided mortalities and morbidities from NMT in Delhi. The willingness assessment indicates that the average per capita time spent walking and cycling in Delhi is 11.054 and 2.255 min, respectively. The results from the application of the NMT in Delhi show the annual reduction in CO2 and PM2.5 to be 121.5 kilotons and 138.9 tons, respectively. The model estimates the expected co-benefits from increased physical activities and reduced PM2.5 exposure at 17,529 avoided cases of mortality with an associated savings of about USD 4870 million in Delhi. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue 2nd Edition: Occupational & Environmental Health Risk Assessment)
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