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Evidence-Based Practice in Nursing

A special issue of International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health (ISSN 1660-4601). This special issue belongs to the section "Health Care Sciences & Services".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 July 2024 | Viewed by 9732

Special Issue Editor

Division of Nursing, Winston-Salem State University, Winston-Salem, NC 27110, USA
Interests: health services research; nursing research; HIV/AIDS; maternal and child health; health outcome research

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Evidence-based practice (EBP) is an important tool in improving healthcare quality and patient outcomes, while also reducing the overall cost of care. It involves forming a clinical question to identify a problem, gathering the best evidence, analyzing the evidence, applying the evidence to clinical practice, and assessing the result. It can provide health workers with the scientific research to make well-founded decisions, and help them pinpoint care strategies that can help their patients. It helps ultimately to improve the public health, which is high in our concerns.

This Special Issue aims to provide a venue for networking and communication with scholars and health workers, in order to help bridge the gap between research-generated evidence and clinical nursing practice and education. We welcome original articles, review papers, communications, brief reports, case reports, etc. All papers will be published with fully open access after peer review.

Dr. Elijah O. Onsomu
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2500 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • evidence-based practice
  • nursing
  • healthcare

Published Papers (5 papers)

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Research

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14 pages, 618 KiB  
Article
Examining the Effect of a Parent-to-Parent Intervention for Low-Income Youth with Serious Emotional and Behavioral Challenges
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2023, 20(14), 6435; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph20146435 - 24 Jul 2023
Viewed by 990
Abstract
Background: Numerous barriers to mental health utilization exist for families of children who present with serious emotional and behavioral challenges. Evidence-based practices that facilitate equitable outcomes across diverse populations are essential to identify. This study examined possible differential service outcomes in a Medicaid-funded, [...] Read more.
Background: Numerous barriers to mental health utilization exist for families of children who present with serious emotional and behavioral challenges. Evidence-based practices that facilitate equitable outcomes across diverse populations are essential to identify. This study examined possible differential service outcomes in a Medicaid-funded, parent-to-parent intervention called Parent Support Partner (PSP). Method: Data from four hundred and sixty-four parents who received PSP services were evaluated for possible demographic differences in service completion. Within-group analyses were utilized for an analysis of outcomes (parent change, child functioning; treatment acceptability) within a subset (N = 153) of those who completed services. Results: No racial disparities were found in those who completed PSP (43%) when compared to those who did not (57%). Regression analyses uncovered significant improvements in parent competence and confidence, as well as overall child functioning (global functioning across domains such as school, home, behaviors). Consistent with identifying evidence-based practices, findings were seen consistently across the diverse sample of those who completed PSP services. Improvements in parents’ sense of competence and confidence were correlated with perceptions of treatment acceptability. Discussion: PSP is an innovative and promising intervention with demonstrated high levels of acceptability found to increase parent confidence and self-competence to advocate for treatments that can improve the mental health functioning of their child. Future investigations of factors associated with increasing PSP service completion and outcomes in larger and more diverse populations are necessary. Implications for considering and possibly adopting this evidence-informed practice within the nursing profession are provided. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Evidence-Based Practice in Nursing)
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15 pages, 380 KiB  
Article
Evaluating a Telephone and Home Blood Pressure Monitoring Intervention to Improve Blood Pressure Control and Self-Care Behaviors in Adults with Low-Socioeconomic Status
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2023, 20(7), 5287; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph20075287 - 28 Mar 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1643
Abstract
Hypertension (HTN) affects nearly 75 million in the United States, and percentages increase with low socioeconomic status (SES) due to poor access to, and quality of, care, and poor self-care behaviors. Federally Qualified Health Centers (FQHCs) employ evidence-based strategies, such as telehealth interventions, [...] Read more.
Hypertension (HTN) affects nearly 75 million in the United States, and percentages increase with low socioeconomic status (SES) due to poor access to, and quality of, care, and poor self-care behaviors. Federally Qualified Health Centers (FQHCs) employ evidence-based strategies, such as telehealth interventions, to improve blood pressure (BP) control in under-resourced communities, yet a southeastern FQHC could achieve a BP control rate of only 27.6%, well below the Health People 2020 goal of 61.2%. This pilot project used a pre/post, matched-cohort design to evaluate the effect of a telehealth intervention on BP control and self-care behaviors. Secondary outcomes included self-efficacy and perceived stress. Frequency and percentage, Wilcoxon signed-rank, and McNemar tests were used for statistical analysis of results from a convenience sample of 27 participants. Baseline HTN management guidance that incorporated home blood pressure monitoring (HBPM) was reinforced through telephone counseling every two weeks. Although BP control was not achieved, average scores for systolic and diastolic blood pressures decreased significantly: 13 mm Hg (p = 0.0136) and 5 mm Hg (p = 0.0095), respectively. Statistically significant differences were also seen in select self-care behaviors. Greater BP reduction aligned with higher self-efficacy scores and call engagement. Overall, telephone counseling and HBPM were feasible and effective in reducing BP and increasing self-care behaviors. The inability to control BP may be attributable to under-recognition of stress, lack of medication adherence/reconciliation, and underutilization of guideline-based prescribing recommendations. Findings elucidate the potential effectiveness of a sustainable telehealth intervention to improve BP in low-SES populations. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Evidence-Based Practice in Nursing)

Review

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15 pages, 1819 KiB  
Review
Mindfulness on Rumination in Patients with Depressive Disorder: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2022, 19(23), 16101; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph192316101 - 01 Dec 2022
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1621
Abstract
Objective: To systematically evaluate the effectiveness of mindfulness-based interventions (MBIs) on rumination among patients with depression and their efficacy across countries and year of publication and control conditions. Methods: Web of Science Core Collection, Medline, BIOSIS Citation Index, KCI-Korean Journal Database, SciELO Citation [...] Read more.
Objective: To systematically evaluate the effectiveness of mindfulness-based interventions (MBIs) on rumination among patients with depression and their efficacy across countries and year of publication and control conditions. Methods: Web of Science Core Collection, Medline, BIOSIS Citation Index, KCI-Korean Journal Database, SciELO Citation Index, PubMed, Cochrane Library, and Embase were searched to include randomized controlled trials of MBIs for depressive rumination that met the criteria. The Rumination Scale was used as the primary outcome indicator; Depression, mindfulness, and anxiety indexes were selected as the secondary outcome indicators. An evaluation of bias risk was conducted to identify possible sources of bias based on methodological and clinical factors. RevMan5.3 software was used to perform a meta-analysis of the extracted data. Results: Nineteen studies with 1138 patients were included. Meta-analysis showed that MBIs could significantly reduce rumination levels in patients with depression (standardized mean difference (SMD) = −0.46; 95% confidence interval (CI): −0.58, −0.34; p < 0.001), notably improve depression (SMD = −0.58; 95% CI: −0.83, −0.32; p < 0.001), enhance mindfulness ability (SMD = 0.95; 95% CI: 0.57, 1.32; p < 0.001), and reduce the anxiety of patients with depression (SMD = −0.45, 95% CI: −0.62, −0.27; p < 0.001). MBIs conducted in Asia improved rumination better than studies in Europe and North America (SMD = −2.05 95% CI: −4.08, −0.01; p < 0.001) but had no greater effect than behavior activation on depression. The interventions carried out in the past 5 years were significantly better than earlier studies in improving mindfulness levels (SMD = 2.74; 95% CI: 0.81, 4.66; p = 0.005). Conclusions: MBIs are effective in the treatment of depression as they produce pleasant improvement in rumination and depression, decrease the degree of anxiety, and enhance mindfulness levels compared to controls. In newer forms of MBIs, regional differences need to be considered when designing the intervention program. More large, high-quality randomized controlled studies are needed to confirm the conclusion that the effectiveness of MBIs has differences in terms of the trial area and year of publication. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Evidence-Based Practice in Nursing)
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Other

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12 pages, 1308 KiB  
Commentary
Climate Change, Environmental Health, and Challenges for Nursing Discipline
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2023, 20(9), 5682; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph20095682 - 28 Apr 2023
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 2546
Abstract
Current data and scientific predictions about the consequences of climate change are accurate in suggesting disaster. Since 2019, climate change has become a threat to human health, and major consequences on health and health systems are already observed. Climate change is a central [...] Read more.
Current data and scientific predictions about the consequences of climate change are accurate in suggesting disaster. Since 2019, climate change has become a threat to human health, and major consequences on health and health systems are already observed. Climate change is a central concern for the nursing discipline, even though nursing theorists’ understanding of the environment has led to problematic gaps that impact the current context. Today, nursing discipline is facing new challenges. Nurses are strategically placed to respond to the impacts of climate change through their practice, research, and training in developing, implementing, and sustaining innovation towards climate change mitigation and adaptation. It is urgent for them to adapt their practice to this reality to become agents of change. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Evidence-Based Practice in Nursing)
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12 pages, 1247 KiB  
Systematic Review
Efficacy and Safety of Topical Application of Olive Oil for Preventing Pressure Ulcers: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2022, 19(22), 14921; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph192214921 - 13 Nov 2022
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 2102
Abstract
The purpose was to identify and summarize the existing evidence on the efficacy and safety of the topical application of olive oil for preventing pressure ulcers (PUs). We included only randomized controlled trials (RCTs) involving patients at risk of developing PUs, testing the [...] Read more.
The purpose was to identify and summarize the existing evidence on the efficacy and safety of the topical application of olive oil for preventing pressure ulcers (PUs). We included only randomized controlled trials (RCTs) involving patients at risk of developing PUs, testing the topical application of olive oil versus other products for PU prevention. We assessed the risk of bias using the RoB 2 tool, and the certainty of the evidence with GRADE. Four RCTs met the eligibility criteria. All studies were judged at a low risk of bias overall. The meta-analysis showed that the clinical efficacy of olive oil for prevention occurs by reducing the incidence of PUs (RR = 0.56, 95% CI = 0.30 to 0.79, I2 = 0%); with no differences in adverse effects, it may be associated with a shorter development time of PUs and shorter hospital stays. The certainty of the evidence assessed by the GRADE approach was moderate and low. The topical application of olive oil is effective and safe in reducing the incidence of PUs compared to other treatments. These findings could provide new insights into olive oil as a preventive and alternative treatment for PUs as it is accessible and inexpensive compared to other products. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Evidence-Based Practice in Nursing)
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