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Diabetes and Metabolic Disorders: Epidemiology, Complications, and Treatment

A special issue of International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health (ISSN 1660-4601). This special issue belongs to the section "Health Care Sciences & Services".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 December 2020)

Special Issue Editors

Unit of Endocrinology, Fondazione IRCCS Cà Granda-Ospedale, Maggiore Policlinico Milan, 20122 Milan, Italy
Interests: type 1 diabetes; type 2 diabetes; post-transplant diabetes; innovative therapies; diabetes complications; cystic fibrosis related diabetes mellitus
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals
Dr. Veronica Resi
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Unit of Endocrinology Fondazione IRCCS Ca’ Granda Ospedale Maggiore Policlinico, Milan, Italy
Interests: pre-gestational diabetes; gestational diabetes; type 1 diabetes; type 2 diabetes; innovative therapies; technology in diabetes
Dr. Alessia Gaglio
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Unit of Endocrinology Fondazione IRCCS Ca’ Granda Ospedale Maggiore Policlinico, Milan, Italy
Interests: diet in type 1; type 2 and gestational diabetes; Mediterranean diet; sarcopenia; carbo-counting; eating habits; physical activity

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Diabetes mellitus is a chronic disorder, the prevalence of which is increasing worldwide. The IDF Diabetes Atlas (Ninth edition 2019) reports that approximately 463 million adults aged 20–79 years were living with diabetes in 2017; by 2045, this number will rise to 700 million. The proportion of people with type 2 diabetes is increasing in most countries, and 79% of adults with diabetes are living in low- and middle-income countries. The greatest number of people with diabetes are between 40 and 59 years of age, and about 232 million people with diabetes are undiagnosed. Diabetes caused 4.2 million deaths and at least USD 760 billion dollars in health expenditure in 2017. Finally, 374 million people are at increased risk of developing type 2 diabetes.

The chronic complications of diabetes (i.e., cardiovascular events, nephropathy, retinopathy, neuropathy, and diabetic foot) are the main causes of the increased mortality and morbidity in diabetic patients, and hospitalization for these conditions represents the major cost of diabetes mellitus.

Lifestyle changes, including diet and physical activity, are integral parts of the self-management and treatment of diabetes. In type 1 diabetes, carb-counting is a cornerstone for diabetes education for managing blood glucose levels and insulin dose. In type 2 diabetes, increasing physical activity and reducing sedentary time play a key role in achieving and maintaining an adequate body weight and reducing insulin resistance and glycaemia.

Currently, new drugs have become available for the treatment of hyperglycemia in type 2 diabetes. In particular, sodium glucose transporter inhibitors (SGLT 2i) and GLP1 receptor agonists (GLP1 RAs) have been shown to provide cardiorenal protection.

New insulin analogues closely mimic the kinetics of physiological insulin and sensor-augmented pump (SAP) therapy has drastically reduced both glycemic variability and the risk of hypoglycemia in patients with type 1 diabetes.

Authors are welcome to submit papers on epidemiology, chronic complications and treatment in people with any form of diabetes. Both original articles and state-of-the-art reviews are welcome.

Potential topics include but are not limited to the following:

  • Epidemiology of pre-diabetes, diabetes, and complications of diabetes;
  • Risk of diabetes mellitus: prediabetes;
  • Prevention of type 2 diabetes;
  • Chronic complications of diabetes;
  • Heart failure and diabetes: management and treatment;
  • Cardiovascular disease in diabetes: management and treatment;
  • Chronic kidney disease in diabetes: management and treatment;
  • Diabetic retinopathy: management and treatment;
  • Diabetic neuropathy: management and treatment;
  • The diabetic foot: management and treatment;
  • Other diabetic complications: management and treatment;
  • Pre-gestational and gestational diabetes: management and therapy;
  • Post-transplant diabetes: prevention and treatment;
  • Diabetes in the elderly: prevention and treatment;
  • Diabetes and depression;
  • Cystic-fibrosis-related diabetes;
  • Innovative therapies;
  • Cardiovascular and renal protection in diabetes;
  • Dietary intervention in severely obese people with diabetes;
  • Carb counting for type 1 diabetes;
  • Increasing physical activity and reducing sedentary time for diabetes prevention and treatment;
  • Technology and diabetes;
  • Telemedicine and diabetes.

Prof. Dr. Emanuela Orsi
Dr. Veronica Resi
Dr. Alessia Gaglio
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2500 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • type 1 diabetes
  • type 2 diabetes
  • diabetes and pregnancy
  • diabetic complications
  • post-transplant diabetes
  • secondary diabetes

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

12 pages, 1571 KiB  
Article
Prevalence of Dyslipidaemia among Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus Patients in the Western Cape, South Africa
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(23), 8735; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17238735 - 24 Nov 2020
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 2154
Abstract
Dyslipidaemia, an irregular aggregate of lipids in the blood is common in diabetes and cardiovascular disease sufferers. A cross-sectional study on the prevalence of dyslipidaemia was performed among type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) patients in the Western Cape, South Africa. Patients (n [...] Read more.
Dyslipidaemia, an irregular aggregate of lipids in the blood is common in diabetes and cardiovascular disease sufferers. A cross-sectional study on the prevalence of dyslipidaemia was performed among type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) patients in the Western Cape, South Africa. Patients (n = 100) that participated in the study were within the age range of 19–68 years, of whom 89% were observed to have serum lipid abnormalities. Out of the 100 patients, 56%, 64%, 61%, and 65% were recorded to have high total cholesterol (TC), hypertriglycemia, increased low-density lipoproteins cholesterol (LDL-C), and reduced high-density lipoproteins cholesterol (HDL-C), respectively. In male diabetic patients, a marked prevalence of (94%) dyslipidemia was noted, of which 52% were affected by high TC (5.3–7.9 mmol/L), with 70% having a high level of triglyceride (TG) [1.72–7.34 mmol/L], while 60% had a high LDL-C (3.1–5.5 mmol/L), including 78% with low HDL-C (0.7–1.1 mmol/L). In comparison, 84% of diabetic females had dyslipidemia, with high TC (5.1–8.1 mmol/L), hypertriglycemia (1.73–8.63 mmol/L), high LDL-C (3.1–5.6 mmol/L), and low levels of HDL-C (0.8–1.1 mmol/L) affecting 60%, 58%, 62%, and 52% of the patients, respectively. This study showed the importance of screening and the regular surveillance of dyslipidaemia in T2DM patients as there is a paucity of data on it in Africa. Full article
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