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The Influence of Communication on Understanding Health and Risk

A special issue of International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health (ISSN 1660-4601). This special issue belongs to the section "Health Behavior, Chronic Disease and Health Promotion".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (1 June 2023) | Viewed by 5445

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
1. CISAS - Center for Research and Development in Agrifood Systems and Sustainability, Escola Superior Agrária, Instituto Politécnico de Viana do Castelo, Rua Escola Industrial e Comercial de Nun’Àlvares, 4900-347 Viana do Castelo, Portugal
2. Veterinary and Animal Research Centre (CECAV), UTAD, Associate Laboratory for Animal and Veterinary Sciences (AL4AnimalS) Quinta de Prados, 5000-801 Vila Real, Portugal
3. EpiUnit – Instituto de Saúde Pública da Universidade do Porto, Laboratory for Integrative and Translational Research in Population Health (ITR), Rua das Taipas, nº 135, 4050-091 Porto, Portugal
Interests: One Health; food safety; health literacy; parasitology; zoonoses
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

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Guest Editor
1. Human and Social Sciences Faculty, Fernando Pessoa University, 4249-004 Porto, Portugal
2. RISE–Health Research Network, Faculty of Medicine, University of Porto, 4200-319 Porto, Portugal
Interests: demography; family sociology; migrations; urban studies; life styles
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

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Guest Editor
Centre for Biotechnology and Fine Chemistry, Faculty of Biotechnology, Portuguese Catholic University, 4200-072 Porto, Portugal
Interests: microbial food safety; virulence factors in food pathogens; Listeria monocytogenes and listeriosis; Campylobacter spp. and campylobacteriosis; microbial characterization; technological improvement of traditional foods; bioconservation agents; preservation of lactic acid bacteria
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Facing the SARS-CoV2 pandemic as we still are, health communication, being already a well-known discipline, has won a whole new meaning and relevance, for the best and for the worst. Although its role in public understanding of risk, the infodemic by one side and the absence of bridges among different scientists (medical, social, environmental, of communication and so on) often led to misinformation. This also occurs concerning other diseases or health risks beyond SARS-CoV2 mainly because cross-cutting issues are not addressed like that. Additionally, we tend to confound information and communication, and finally, the information load does not mean change of behaviour. Communication should therefore be made using several channels and stakeholders and trying to reach different contexts as one solution does not fit all societies. This Special Issue plans to give an overview of the most recent advances in health communication and is aimed at providing selected contributions on health literacy, education, promotion, and communication, social media and health communication and the urgent need for One Communication.

Potential topics include, but are not limited to:

  • The problematic of infodemic
  • Health literacy and behaviour changes
  • The influence of social media in (dis)information
  • Assessing citizen health practices and awareness
  • Health education interventions
  • Health promotion interventions
  • The influence of health communication among different health professionals
  • The influence of health communication among health and social scientists
  • The importance of communication in reducing health risk

Dr. Teresa Letra Mateus
Dr. Rui Leandro Maia
Dr. Paula Cristina Maia Teixeira
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2500 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • health literacy
  • one health
  • infodemic
  • social media
  • behavior change
  • health promotion
  • health education

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

13 pages, 403 KiB  
Article
Empowerment and Knowledge as Determinants for Quality of Life: A Contribution to a Better Type 2 Diabetes Self-Management
by Pedro L. Ferreira, Carminda Morais, Rui Pimenta, Inês Ribeiro, Isabel Amorim and Sandra Maria Alves
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2023, 20(5), 4544; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph20054544 - 03 Mar 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1600
Abstract
The purpose of this study was to assess how knowledge and empowerment impact the quality of life (QoL) of a person with type 2 diabetes, leading to better communication and disease management. We conducted a descriptive and observational study of individuals with type [...] Read more.
The purpose of this study was to assess how knowledge and empowerment impact the quality of life (QoL) of a person with type 2 diabetes, leading to better communication and disease management. We conducted a descriptive and observational study of individuals with type 2 diabetes. The Diabetes Empowerment Scale-Short Form (DES-SF), Diabetes Knowledge Test (DKT), and EQ-5D-5L were used, in addition to sociodemographic and clinical characteristics. Evaluating the variability in the DES-SF and DKT in relation to the EQ-5D-5L and identifying possible sociodemographic and clinical determinants were conducted using univariate analyses followed by a multiple linear regression model to test whether the factors significantly predicted QoL. A total of 763 individuals were included in the final sample. Patients aged 65 years or older had lower QoL scores, as well as patients who lived alone, had less than 12 years of education, and experienced complications. The insulin-treated group showed higher scores in DKT than the non-insulin-treated group. It was also found that being male, being under 65 years of age, having no complications present, and having higher levels of knowledge and empowerment predicted higher QoL. Our results show that DKT and DES are still determinants of QoL, even after adjusting for sociodemographic and clinical characteristics. Therefore, literacy and empowerment are important for the improvement of the QoL of people with diabetes, by enabling them to manage their health conditions. New clinical practices focused on education, increasing patients’ knowledge, and empowerment may contribute to better health outcomes. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue The Influence of Communication on Understanding Health and Risk)
12 pages, 699 KiB  
Article
Perception and Knowledge of Portuguese Veterinarians about the Zoonotic Transmission of Helicobacter pylori and Helicobacter suis: The Need for One Health Intervention
by Francisco Cortez Nunes, Silvia Teixeira, Rui Leandro Maia, Irina Amorim and Teresa Letra Mateus
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2022, 19(22), 15087; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph192215087 - 16 Nov 2022
Viewed by 3249
Abstract
Helicobacter species can colonize the gastrointestinal tract of both humans and animals, and are associated with gastrointestinal and extra-gastrointestinal diseases. Some studies indicate that animals, health professionals, and people in close contact with animals might be at higher risk for infection with gastric [...] Read more.
Helicobacter species can colonize the gastrointestinal tract of both humans and animals, and are associated with gastrointestinal and extra-gastrointestinal diseases. Some studies indicate that animals, health professionals, and people in close contact with animals might be at higher risk for infection with gastric Helicobacter spp. Considering that veterinarians are professionals at risk for infection with zoonotic gastric Helicobacters and are also seen by many as health communicators concerning zoonoses, the aim of this study was to evaluate the Portuguese veterinarians’ perception and knowledge of Helicobacter spp. infection and its zoonotic risk/potential. Therefore, a structured questionnaire composed of 34 dichotomic, multiple-choice, rating scale, matrix, drop-down, and open-ended questions was developed and given to Portuguese veterinarians via an online platform from May 2021 to July 2021, and statistical analysis was used to obtain results. There was a total of 149 respondents, most of them (73.8%) being females. Evidently, Portuguese veterinarians have a limited perception regarding Helicobacter spp. infections. Of the respondents that “have heard of Helicobacter”, 17.6% do not know which animal species can be affected by it. Most of the companion animal veterinarians (76.2%) do not consider Helicobacter spp. infection a differential diagnosis when evaluating animals with gastritis. A significant percentage (37.2%) of the respondents that have “heard of H. suis” do not consider it a zoonotic bacterium. There is a need for education and sensitization of veterinarians regarding the potential zoonotic risk of Helicobacter spp. in order to elucidate these professionals to this One Health issue, as the number of reports of non-Helicobacter pylori Helicobacter in livestock, companion, and wild animals is increasing. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue The Influence of Communication on Understanding Health and Risk)
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