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Health Care and Health Services Digital Revolution

A special issue of International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health (ISSN 1660-4601). This special issue belongs to the section "Health Care Sciences & Services".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 July 2023) | Viewed by 21072

Special Issue Editors

Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Messina University, AOU Policlinico “G.Martino” Via C. Valeria, 98100 Messina, Italy
Interests: oral surgery; digital dentistry; digital workflow; prosthetic-implant rehabilitation; bone regeneration; hemoconcentrate; growth factors
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals
Department of Human Pathology in Adulthood and Childhood "G. Barresi", University Hospital "G. Martino" of Messina, Via Consolare Valeria 1, 98125 Messina, Italy
Interests: general surgery; breast and endocrine surgery; minimally invasive surgery; traumatology and innovative surgical techniques development
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The digital revolution has changed many habits in every aspect of our personal and professional lives. As doctors, we have been pushed towards a paradigm shift in every aspect of our job, from diagnosis and the clinical approaches to prosthetic manufacturing.

A whole new clinical approach allows the researcher to investigate using new technologies, and to imagine new approaches to screen, follow, and evaluate the progression of different pathologies and clinical problems. Moreover, research on tissue engineering, 3D morphing, 3D scanner, and innovative materials, has made a significant leap forward.

This Special Issue will investigate medicine and dentistry focusing on the use of digital technologies.

This Special Issue of IJERPH welcomes the submission of manuscripts either describing original research or reviewing the scientific literature.

Dr. Roberto Lo Giudice
Dr. Fausto Famà
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2500 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • digital medicine
  • digital dentistry
  • digital workflow
  • CAD-CAM
  • 3D scanner

Published Papers (8 papers)

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Editorial

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2 pages, 245 KiB  
Editorial
Health Care and Health Service Digital Revolution
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(14), 4913; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17144913 - 08 Jul 2020
Cited by 22 | Viewed by 2113
Abstract
The digital revolution has changed many aspects of the medical profession. Medical doctors and doctors in the dental sciences have been pushed to modify their workflow using new instruments such as decisional software, intraoral and extraoral scanners, and CAD-CAM technologies, which have improved [...] Read more.
The digital revolution has changed many aspects of the medical profession. Medical doctors and doctors in the dental sciences have been pushed to modify their workflow using new instruments such as decisional software, intraoral and extraoral scanners, and CAD-CAM technologies, which have improved diagnostics and the clinical/surgical phase of treatment and follow-up, and nowadays it is clear that medical professional life will continue in the era of digital medicine. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Health Care and Health Services Digital Revolution)

Research

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19 pages, 5740 KiB  
Article
Effects of Temporary Respiration Exercise with Individual Harmonic Frequency on Blood Pressure and Autonomic Balance
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2022, 19(23), 15676; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph192315676 - 25 Nov 2022
Viewed by 1521
Abstract
This study investigated the effects of modulated respiration on blood pressure and autonomic balance to develop a healthcare application system for stabilizing autonomic balance. Thirty-two participants were asked to perform self-regulated tasks with 18 different respiration sequences, and their electrocardiograms (ECG) and blood [...] Read more.
This study investigated the effects of modulated respiration on blood pressure and autonomic balance to develop a healthcare application system for stabilizing autonomic balance. Thirty-two participants were asked to perform self-regulated tasks with 18 different respiration sequences, and their electrocardiograms (ECG) and blood pressure were measured. Changes in cardiovascular system functions and blood pressure were compared between free-breathing and various respiration conditions. Systolic and diastolic blood pressures stabilized after individual harmonic breathing. Autonomic balance, characterized by heart rate variability, was also stabilized with brief respiration training according to harmonic frequency. Five machine-learning algorithms were used to classify the two opposing factors between the free and modulated breathing conditions. The random forest models outperformed the other classifiers in the training data of systolic blood pressure and heart rate variability. The mean areas under the curves (AUCs) were 0.82 for systolic blood pressure and 0.98 for heart rate variability. Our findings lend support that blood pressure and autonomic balance were improved by temporary harmonic frequency respiration. This study provides a self-regulated respiration system that can control and help stabilize blood pressure and autonomic balance, which would help reduce mental stress and enhance human task performance in various fields. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Health Care and Health Services Digital Revolution)
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26 pages, 1944 KiB  
Article
Predictors for E-Government Adoption of SANAD App Services Integrating UTAUT, TPB, TAM, Trust, and Perceived Risk
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2022, 19(14), 8281; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph19148281 - 07 Jul 2022
Cited by 20 | Viewed by 3968
Abstract
Using mobile applications in e-government for the purpose of health protection is a new idea during COVID-19 epidemic. Hence, the goal of this study is to examine the various factors that influence the use of SANAD App As a health protection tool. The [...] Read more.
Using mobile applications in e-government for the purpose of health protection is a new idea during COVID-19 epidemic. Hence, the goal of this study is to examine the various factors that influence the use of SANAD App As a health protection tool. The factors were adopted from well-established models like UTAUT, TAM, and extended PBT. Using survey data from 442 SANAD App from Jordan, the model was empirically validated using AMOS 20 confirmatory factor analysis, structural equation modeling (SEM) and machine learning (ML) methods were performed to assess the study hypotheses. The ML methods used are ANN, SMO, the bagging reduced error pruning tree (RepTree), and random forest. The results suggested several key findings: the respondents’ performance expectancy, effort expectancy, social influence, facilitating conditions, perceived risk, trust, and perceived service quality of this digital technology were significant antecedents for their attitude to using it. The strength of these relationships is affected by the moderating variables, including age, gender, educational level, and internet experience on behavioral intention. Yet, perceived risk did not have a significant effect on attitude towards SANAD App The study adds to literature by empirically testing and theorizing the effects of SANAD App on public health protection. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Health Care and Health Services Digital Revolution)
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13 pages, 337 KiB  
Article
Understanding Patient Needs Regarding Adverse Drug Reaction Reporting Smartphone Applications: A Qualitative Insight from Saudi Arabia
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(8), 3862; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18083862 - 07 Apr 2021
Cited by 6 | Viewed by 2939
Abstract
Background: A pragmatic shift in the healthcare sector characterized by moving from curative to preventive approaches highlights the role of pharmacovigilance in patient safety. There have been few published studies on patient reporting of adverse drug reactions (ADRs) in Saudi Arabia. This qualitative [...] Read more.
Background: A pragmatic shift in the healthcare sector characterized by moving from curative to preventive approaches highlights the role of pharmacovigilance in patient safety. There have been few published studies on patient reporting of adverse drug reactions (ADRs) in Saudi Arabia. This qualitative study aims to explore the community opinions and the need for patient-friendly smartphone applications (SPAs) to enhance their participation in ADR reporting. Methods: Purposeful sampling was followed to recruit study participants, a semi-structured interview guide was used to conduct interviews, and the saturation was reached after the 13th interviewer; no new information was obtained after two subsequent interviews. All the interviews were audio-recorded, transcribed verbatim, and analyzed by means of a standard content analysis framework. Results: As per the WHO guidelines, eleven participants were aware of the term “ADR”. All the participants denied receiving any prior education and attending events about ADRs and were unaware of the Saudi FDA-ADR reporting systems. The use of technologies such as SPAs has been widely accepted with a high level of concern for data confidentiality and privacy. Conclusions: These findings point out the need to build patient-oriented educational programs to increase their awareness of ADR reporting and to prioritize the use of artificial intelligence (AI) to be integrated in the Saudi healthcare system to develop future SPAs for improving both patient safety and signal detection of ADRs. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Health Care and Health Services Digital Revolution)

Review

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15 pages, 738 KiB  
Review
Prevalence, Features and Degree of Association of Oral Lesions in COVID-19: A Systematic Review of Systematic Reviews
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2022, 19(12), 7486; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph19127486 - 18 Jun 2022
Cited by 29 | Viewed by 2072
Abstract
Regardless of rapidly emerging findings on oral lesions described in adult SARS-CoV-2-positive subjects, the evidence level remains quite low and rather contrasting; therefore, the present systematic review of systematic reviews primarily aims to point out the overall prevalence of diagnosed cases. Secondary aims [...] Read more.
Regardless of rapidly emerging findings on oral lesions described in adult SARS-CoV-2-positive subjects, the evidence level remains quite low and rather contrasting; therefore, the present systematic review of systematic reviews primarily aims to point out the overall prevalence of diagnosed cases. Secondary aims are to estimate the degree of association between oral lesions and SARS-CoV-2 infection and to grade, based on the reported frequency, the primary oral lesions, with related clinical presentations and microscopic features, in relation to COVID-19 forms. A study protocol compliant with the PRISMA statement was developed. Twelve studies were included, reporting highly heterogeneous and incomplete findings, thus precluding a meta-analysis. Further studies should be conducted to assess the overall prevalence of cases diagnosed with oral lesions among adult SARS-CoV-2-positive subjects, especially considering novel viral variants, and to determine their degree of association with SARS-CoV-2 infection and COVID-19 forms. Moreover, the reported findings noticed the need to evaluate the putative role both of SARS-CoV-2 in oral lesions genesis and of periodontitis and periodontal microbiome in COVID-19 worsening and re-activations. Deeper insights into oral lesions in adult SARS-CoV-2-positive subjects could enhance the comprehension of illness pathogenesis, natural history and clinical presentation, thus improving the preparedness of health professionals in the inter-disciplinary management of COVID-19. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Health Care and Health Services Digital Revolution)
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18 pages, 1287 KiB  
Systematic Review
Oral Lesions Following Anti-SARS-CoV-2 Vaccination: A Systematic Review
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2022, 19(16), 10228; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph191610228 - 17 Aug 2022
Cited by 25 | Viewed by 1862
Abstract
Increasing evidence relate anti-SARS-CoV-2 vaccinations to orofacial adverse reactions, therefore, the present systematic review aimed to evaluate primary oral lesions diagnosed in adult subjects, following the WHO Emergency Use Listing approved and EMA authorized vaccines, also in relation to cases’ age, gender, comorbidities, [...] Read more.
Increasing evidence relate anti-SARS-CoV-2 vaccinations to orofacial adverse reactions, therefore, the present systematic review aimed to evaluate primary oral lesions diagnosed in adult subjects, following the WHO Emergency Use Listing approved and EMA authorized vaccines, also in relation to cases’ age, gender, comorbidities, and history of COVID-19, and in relation to vaccine type and doses. The study protocol, registered on PROSPERO (CRD42022339032) and compliant with the PRISMA statement, included an electronic search across Scopus, MEDLINE/PubMed, BioMed Central databases, and PROSPERO, ended on 18 June 2022 and succeeded by a manual search, an independent data extraction, and arisk of bias evaluation through ROBINS-I tool. Qualitatively synthesized data from the 13studies included showed an overall low prevalence (16 cases), though higher in females (68.8%), of oral lesions, mainly erosions and ulcers (34.5%). Nine cases were diagnosed following Pfizer-BioNTech, two Moderna, and one AstraZeneca, Serum Institute of India, Sinopharm, and Johnson&Johnson vaccines, respectively; specifically, eight after the first dose and seven after the second. In one case, vaccine type and dose were not specified. Considering newly developing vaccines, presented findings may be updated and further studies needed to highlight factors affecting oral lesion occurrence and specific macro-microscopic phenotypes in relation to cases’ and vaccines’ characteristics. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Health Care and Health Services Digital Revolution)
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9 pages, 13825 KiB  
Case Report
Orthodontics First in Hemimandibular Hyperplasia. “Mind the Gap”
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(19), 7087; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17197087 - 28 Sep 2020
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 2943
Abstract
A 32-year-old man was referred to the Division of Orthodontics of the University of Naples “Federico II”, with a 15-year history of gradually increasing right-sided facial asymmetry. Clinical and radiological examinations was consistent to hemimandibular hyperplasia, a rare developmental asymmetry characterized by three-dimensional [...] Read more.
A 32-year-old man was referred to the Division of Orthodontics of the University of Naples “Federico II”, with a 15-year history of gradually increasing right-sided facial asymmetry. Clinical and radiological examinations was consistent to hemimandibular hyperplasia, a rare developmental asymmetry characterized by three-dimensional enlargement of one-half of the mandible. The standard surgical-orthodontic management was proposed to the patient. However, he refused to undergo bimaxillary orthognatic surgery. Therefore, a different treatment was proposed based on the orthodontic technique of pre-surgical decompensation and post-surgical refinement used in bimaxillary orthognatic surgery planning, and surgical intervention with a condylectomy. The dental arches were evenly levelled out with a multi-bracket treatment and then the condylectomy was performed. Orthodontic treatment continued with a levelling and torque control by 0.19 × 0.25 SS arch and physiotherapy. At the three-month follow-up, the patient showed anterior and posterior bite rebalancing, arch intercuspation recovery, and anterior open bite closure due to muscular self-rebalancing. The two-year follow-up showed regular mandibular dynamic, orthodontic appliances were removed, and the patient was instructed to wear retainer for the following months. The final result was aesthetically reasonable for the patient, although slight asymmetry of the chin persisted. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Health Care and Health Services Digital Revolution)
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11 pages, 2673 KiB  
Case Report
The Use of Cone Beam CT(CBCT) in Differentiation of True from Mimicking Eagle’s Syndrome
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(16), 5654; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17165654 - 05 Aug 2020
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 2411
Abstract
Differentiation of true from mimicking Eagle’s syndrome based on conventional radiography is difficult; however, cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) images can contribute to proper diagnosis of mimicking Eagle’s syndrome. The aim was to study radiological images of a 37-year old female patient (patient [...] Read more.
Differentiation of true from mimicking Eagle’s syndrome based on conventional radiography is difficult; however, cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) images can contribute to proper diagnosis of mimicking Eagle’s syndrome. The aim was to study radiological images of a 37-year old female patient (patient #1), with chronic cervicofacial pain who underwent radiological diagnosis with a conventional panoramic machine; another 75-year old male patient (patient #2), with chronic oropharyngeal pain, underwent a radiological diagnosis with the CBCT machine, with a field of a view of 16 × 12 cm. Exposure factors were 120 kVp, 7 mA, with a 20 s exposure time of acquisition. The results show a panoramic image (patient #1) with a pathologically elongated styloid process 46 mm of length, which was surgically removed, releasing the patient from further pain episodes. CBCT acquisition (patient #2) showed an impacted left maxillary canine in the edentulous maxilla and a peculiar elongation of both stylohyoid complexes as impressive, “collar-like”, bilateral, elongated, multiple segmented, calcified stylohyoid complexes, without pressure on the vital neurovascular neck structures, mimicking true Eagle’s syndrome. The impacted maxillary canine was surgically extracted with a subsequent resolution of pain episodes and the cessation of neurological complaints. The conclusions suggest that the use of CBCT images can contribute to differentiating mimicking from true Eagle’s syndrome, which has been rarely reported in the literature. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Health Care and Health Services Digital Revolution)
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