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Family-Based Treatment Approaches in Child and Adolescent Mental Health Services

A special issue of International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health (ISSN 1660-4601). This special issue belongs to the section "Health Care Sciences & Services".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 May 2024 | Viewed by 1175

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Matthew G. Biel
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Georgetown University Medical Center, MedStar Georgetown University Hospital, Washington, DC 20007, USA
Interests: child, adolescent, and adult psychiatry; child and adolescent development; mood and anxiety disorders; trauma and PTSD; psychosomatic illness and psychiatric care of the medically ill child
Dr. J. Corey Williams
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
MedStar Georgetown University Hospital, Washington, DC 20007, USA
Interests: psychiatry; child and adolescent psychiatry

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Research on mental health and well-being has focused on the mental health of individuals. However, for most individuals, and especially for children and adolescents, mental health and well-being are familial in nature. Parents and caregivers shape the mental health of children via family routines and modes of interaction; mental health problems are heritable; parental and children’s mental health problems are interrelated; the treatment of parental mental health problems relieves children’s mental health problems; and parental involvement in the treatment of children’s mental health problems improves clinical outcomes. To advance the understanding and promotion of mental health in children and adolescents, the field needs to develop family-based clinical approaches. These new approaches require paradigm shifts in models of treatment delivery within health systems that are designed to treat individuals, not families. Additionally, family-based approaches can be developed in ways that are responsive to the needs of different cultural groups, and have the potential to improve participation and outcomes for racial, ethnic, and cultural groups that are underserved by existing clinical services. Papers seeking to explore, innovate, and elevate family-based mental health approaches are invited for submission to this Special Issue, especially those that consider cultural and historical contexts and those that focus on BIPOC communities.

Dr. Matthew G. Biel
Dr. J. Corey Williams
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2500 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

 

Keywords

  • family
  • intergenerational
  • relational health
  • early intervention
  • prevention
  • dyadic

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

12 pages, 530 KiB  
Article
The Impact of Postpartum Depression on the Early Mother-Infant Relationship during the COVID-19 Pandemic: Perception versus Reality
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2024, 21(2), 164; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph21020164 - 31 Jan 2024
Viewed by 830
Abstract
Postpartum depression (PPD) can interfere with the establishment of affective bonds between infant and mother, which is important for the cognitive, social–emotional, and physical development of the child. Rates of PPD have increased during the COVID-19 pandemic, likely due to the added stress [...] Read more.
Postpartum depression (PPD) can interfere with the establishment of affective bonds between infant and mother, which is important for the cognitive, social–emotional, and physical development of the child. Rates of PPD have increased during the COVID-19 pandemic, likely due to the added stress and limited support available to new parents. The present study examined whether parenting-related stress, perceived bonding impairments, the quality of observed mother–infant interactions, and salivary oxytocin levels differ between depressed and non-depressed mothers, along with differential impacts of COVID-19 on depressed mothers. Participants included 70 mothers (45 depressed, 25 controls) with infants aged 2–6 months. All data were collected remotely to ease participant burden during the pandemic. Depression was associated with experiences of heightened parenting-related stress and bonding difficulties. These differences were not observed during mother–infant interactions or in salivary oxytocin levels. Differences in COVID-19-related experiences were minimal, though depressed mothers rated slightly higher stress associated with returning to work and financial impacts of the pandemic. Findings highlight the importance of early intervention for PPD to mitigate long-term effects on mothers, children, and families. Additionally, they underscore the need for early intervention to support the developing mother–infant dyad relationship during this crucial time. Full article
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