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Population Health Perspectives on Environmental Exposures and Influences on the Prevalence of Birth Defects and Developmental Disabilities

A special issue of International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health (ISSN 1660-4601). This special issue belongs to the section "Global Health".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 May 2019) | Viewed by 8262

Special Issue Editor


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Guest Editor
Department of Community and Family Health, College of Public Health, University of South Florida, 13201 Bruce B. Downs Blvd MDC56, Tampa, FL 33612, USA
Interests: perinatal/pediatric epidemiology; health services, birth defects, developmental disabilities; pregnancy outcomes, applications of spatial methods to the study of health and disease
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

While hypotheses concerning the etiology of birth defects and developmental disabilities abound, the causes of most of these conditions in infants and young children are unknown.  The examination of environmental exposures has received increasing scrutiny, especially in the context of emerging awareness of gene–environment interactions and epigenetic effects of environmental exposures. Spatial statistical methods as well as GIS-based techniques have supported many interesting studies in this area.

In this Special Issue, we seek manuscripts with empirical data that extend our knowledge of the potential role of environmental factors (including but not limited to air, water, soil, meteorology) that may be associated with an increased risk for birth defects and developmental disabilities, directly or through the interaction with community-level or individual-level factors.

Prof. Russell S. Kirby
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2500 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Birth defects
  • Developmental disabilities
  • Developmental delay
  • Population health
  • Multi-level modeling
  • Disease mapping
  • Environmental health
  • Epigenetics
  • Gene–environment interaction
  • Exposome
  • Spatial analysis

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

12 pages, 309 KiB  
Article
Maternal Occupational Oil Mist Exposure and Birth Defects, National Birth Defects Prevention Study, 1997–2011
by Miriam Siegel, Carissa M. Rocheleau, Candice Y. Johnson, Martha A. Waters, Christina C. Lawson, Tiffany Riehle-Colarusso, Jennita Reefhuis and The National Birth Defects Prevention Study
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2019, 16(9), 1560; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph16091560 - 04 May 2019
Cited by 8 | Viewed by 2965
Abstract
Workers in various industries can be exposed to oil mists when oil-based fluids are aerosolized during work processes. Oil mists can be inhaled or deposited on the skin. Little research exists on the reproductive effects of oil mist exposure in pregnant workers. We [...] Read more.
Workers in various industries can be exposed to oil mists when oil-based fluids are aerosolized during work processes. Oil mists can be inhaled or deposited on the skin. Little research exists on the reproductive effects of oil mist exposure in pregnant workers. We aimed to investigate associations between occupational oil mist exposure in early pregnancy and a spectrum of birth defects using data from 22,011 case mothers and 8140 control mothers in the National Birth Defects Prevention Study. In total, 150 mothers were rated as exposed. Manufacturing jobs, particularly apparel manufacturing, comprised the largest groups of exposed mothers. Mothers of infants with septal heart defects (odds ratio (OR): 1.8, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.0–3.3), and especially perimembranous ventricular septal defects (OR: 2.5, CI: 1.2–5.2), were more likely to be occupationally exposed to oil mists in early pregnancy than control mothers; and their rater-estimated cumulative exposure was more likely to be higher. This was the first U.S. study evaluating associations between oil mist exposure and a broad spectrum of birth defects. Our results are consistent with previous European studies, supporting a potential association between oil-based exposures and congenital heart defects. Further research is needed to evaluate the reproductive effects of occupational oil mist exposure. Full article
9 pages, 538 KiB  
Article
Clinical, Neuroimaging, and Neurophysiological Findings in Children with Microcephaly Related to Congenital Zika Virus Infection
by Maria-Lucia C. Lage, Alessandra L. de Carvalho, Paloma A. Ventura, Tania B. Taguchi, Adriana S. Fernandes, Suely F. Pinho, Onildo T. Santos-Junior, Clara L. Ramos and Cristiana M. Nascimento-Carvalho
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2019, 16(3), 309; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph16030309 - 23 Jan 2019
Cited by 31 | Viewed by 4950
Abstract
Zika virus (ZIKV) infection appeared in Brazil in 2015, causing an epidemic outbreak with increased rates of microcephaly and other serious birth disorders. We reviewed 102 cases of children who were diagnosed with microcephaly at birth and who had gestational exposure to ZIKV [...] Read more.
Zika virus (ZIKV) infection appeared in Brazil in 2015, causing an epidemic outbreak with increased rates of microcephaly and other serious birth disorders. We reviewed 102 cases of children who were diagnosed with microcephaly at birth and who had gestational exposure to ZIKV during the outbreak. We describe the clinical, neuroimaging, and neurophysiological findings. Most mothers (81%) reported symptoms of ZIKV infection, especially cutaneous rash, during the first trimester of pregnancy. The microcephaly was severe in 54.9% of the cases. All infants presented with brain malformations. The most frequent neuroimaging findings were cerebral atrophy (92.1%), ventriculomegaly (92.1%), malformation of cortical development (85.1%), and cortical–subcortical calcifications (80.2%). Abnormalities in neurological exams were found in 97.0% of the cases, epileptogenic activity in 56.3%, and arthrogryposis in 10.8% of the infants. The sensorineural screening suggested hearing loss in 17.3% and visual impairment in 14.1% of the infants. This group of infants who presented with microcephaly and whose mothers were exposed to ZIKV early during pregnancy showed clinical and radiological criteria for congenital ZIKV infection. A high frequency of brain abnormalities and signs of early neurological disorders were found, and epileptogenic activity and signs of sensorineural alterations were common. This suggests that microcephaly can be associated with a worst spectrum of neurological manifestations. Full article
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