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Influenza Viruses: Epidemiology, Evolution and Public Health Impact

A special issue of International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health (ISSN 1660-4601). This special issue belongs to the section "Global Health".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 October 2019) | Viewed by 8617

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Department of Veterinary and Biomedical Sciences, Penn State University, Wiley Lane, University Park, PA 16802-1110, USA
Interests: zoonotic and emerging viruses; diagnostic assay development; immune responses to viruses; viral pathogenesis; viral vaccines and anti-virals
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

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Guest Editor
Penn State University Animal Diagnostic Laboratory
Interests: Virus/host interactions; immune correlates of protection against viral infections; orthomyxoviruses

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health (IJERPH) has commissioned a Special Issue on Influenza Viruses.

This focus of this Special Issue is on pathogenesis, epidemiology, evolution, animal and public health impacts of circulating and emerging influenza viruses. Authors of manuscripts that address emerging influenza strains and innovative influenza virus prevention, control or monitoring strategies are particularly encouraged to submit their work for consideration.

Recently novel strains of influenza viruses have been identified, and currently four genera have been described in an ever-broadening range of host species. The potential for zoonotic strains of influenza A, B, C or D to emerge is not fully understood. Increased understanding of pathogenesis, genetic variation, viral adaptation to hosts, molecular determinants of virulence, and virus transmission patterns are urgently needed to guide development of effective monitoring, prevention and control strategies.

Prof. Suresh Varma Kuchipudi
Dr. Ruth Helmus Nissly
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2500 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Influenza
  • Emerging infectious diseases
  • Health
  • Epidemiology
  • Zoonosis

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

16 pages, 2974 KiB  
Article
Spread of Infectious Disease Modeling and Analysis of Different Factors on Spread of Infectious Disease Based on Cellular Automata
by Sheng Bin, Gengxin Sun and Chih-Cheng Chen
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2019, 16(23), 4683; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph16234683 - 25 Nov 2019
Cited by 35 | Viewed by 5160
Abstract
Infectious diseases are an important cause of human death. The study of the pathogenesis, spread regularity, and development trend of infectious diseases not only provides a theoretical basis for future research on infectious diseases, but also has practical guiding significance for the prevention [...] Read more.
Infectious diseases are an important cause of human death. The study of the pathogenesis, spread regularity, and development trend of infectious diseases not only provides a theoretical basis for future research on infectious diseases, but also has practical guiding significance for the prevention and control of their spread. In this paper, a controlled differential equation and an objective function of infectious diseases were established by mathematical modeling. Based on cellular automata theory and a compartmental model, the SLIRDS (Susceptible-Latent-Infected-Recovered-Dead-Susceptible) model was constructed, a model which can better reflect the actual infectious process of infectious diseases. Considering the spread of disease in different populations, the model combines population density, sex ratio, and age structure to set the evolution rules of the model. Finally, on the basis of the SLIRDS model, the complex spread process of pandemic influenza A (H1N1) was simulated. The simulation results are similar to the macroscopic characteristics of pandemic influenza A (H1N1) in real life, thus the accuracy and rationality of the SLIRDS model are confirmed. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Influenza Viruses: Epidemiology, Evolution and Public Health Impact)
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10 pages, 2336 KiB  
Article
Interaction Among Influenza Viruses A/H1N1, A/H3N2, and B in Japan
by Ayako Suzuki, Kenji Mizumoto, Andrei R. Akhmetzhanov and Hiroshi Nishiura
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2019, 16(21), 4179; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph16214179 - 29 Oct 2019
Cited by 7 | Viewed by 3174
Abstract
Seasonal influenza epidemics occur each winter season in temperate zones, involving up to 650,000 deaths each year globally. A published study demonstrated that the circulation of one influenza virus type during early influenza season in the United States interferes with the activity of [...] Read more.
Seasonal influenza epidemics occur each winter season in temperate zones, involving up to 650,000 deaths each year globally. A published study demonstrated that the circulation of one influenza virus type during early influenza season in the United States interferes with the activity of other influenza virus types. However, this finding has yet to be validated in other settings. In the present work, we investigated the interaction among seasonal influenza viruses (A/H1N1, A/H3N2 and B) in Japan. Sentinel and virus surveillance data were used to estimate the type-specific incidence from 2010 to 2019, and statistical correlations among the type-specific incidence were investigated. We identified significant negative correlations between incidence of the dominant virus and the complementary incidence. When correlation was identified during the course of an epidemic, a linear regression model accurately predicted the epidemic size of a particular virus type before the epidemic peak. The peak of influenza type B took place later in the season than that of influenza A, although the epidemic peaks of influenza A/H1N1 and A/H3N2 nearly coincided. Given the interaction among different influenza viruses, underlying mechanisms including age and spatial dependence should be explored in future. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Influenza Viruses: Epidemiology, Evolution and Public Health Impact)
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