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Alcohol Use and Misuse: A Public Health Perspective

A special issue of International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health (ISSN 1660-4601). This special issue belongs to the section "Health-Related Quality of Life and Well-Being".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (1 May 2023) | Viewed by 5295

Special Issue Editor


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Guest Editor
Children and Adolescent Health Department, Institute of Mother and Child, 01-211 Warsaw, Poland
Interests: fetal alcohol spectrum disorders (FASD); psychology; epidemiology; psychoactive substance use; prevention science; evaluation

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Scientific evidence on the determinants of health of populations clearly shows that alcohol use is one of the leading causes of death worldwide. Despite the numerous organized efforts undertaken by governmental, public and private bodies to prevent and diminish the health and social threats caused by alcohol, they still exist. Alcohol use impacts mental health and increases the risk of injuries and infectious and noncommunicable diseases (e.g., digestive, cardiovascular and cancers). Particularly prone to developing alcohol-related problems are women, especially during pregnancy, children and adolescents, and older and less affluent people.

This is why research and knowledge exchange is needed to establish a new, more effective public health approach to manage alcohol use and misuse that is tailored to the specific needs of vulnerable groups. This approach should include studies and activities at international, national or local levels, targeting the general population as well as specific subpopulations (e.g., teenagers, pregnant women, minorities, migrants, etc.); focus on school, healthcare, workplace, community or other environments; influence people’s personal habits, attitudes and behaviors via policies, media, education or therapy; and address alcohol issues alone or in the context of other social and health problems. 

The complexity of the problem and the challenges of changing alcohol-related behavior require an interdisciplinary approach. Therefore, we invite reviews as well as quantitative, qualitative and mixed methods studies from the epidemiology, health, social sciences, public policy, communication, education and other relevant fields. The listed keywords suggest just a few of the many possible subject areas. 

Dr. Katarzyna Okulicz-Kozaryn
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2500 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • alcohol
  • mental health
  • women’s health
  • children’s health
  • health determinants
  • health consequences
  • social inequalities
  • evidence-based interventions

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

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14 pages, 523 KiB  
Article
Changes in Alcohol Consumption during the COVID-19 Pandemic: Evidence from Wisconsin
by Rachel Pomazal, Kristen M. C. Malecki, Laura McCulley, Noah Stafford, Mikayla Schowalter and Amy Schultz
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2023, 20(7), 5301; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph20075301 - 29 Mar 2023
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 2012
Abstract
Alcohol consumption often increases in times of stress such as disease outbreaks. Wisconsin has historically ranked as one of the heaviest drinking states in the United States with a persistent drinking culture. Few studies have documented the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on [...] Read more.
Alcohol consumption often increases in times of stress such as disease outbreaks. Wisconsin has historically ranked as one of the heaviest drinking states in the United States with a persistent drinking culture. Few studies have documented the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on alcohol consumption after the first few months of the pandemic. The primary aim of this study is to identify factors related to changes in drinking at three timepoints during the first eighteen months of the pandemic. Survey data was collected from May to June 2020 (Wave 1), from January to February 2021 (Wave 2), and in June 2021 (Wave 3) among past participants of the Survey of the Health of Wisconsin. Study participants included 1290, 1868, and 1827 participants in each survey wave, respectively. Participants were asked how their alcohol consumption changed in each wave. Being younger, having anxiety, a bachelor’s degree or higher, having higher income, working remotely, and children in the home were significantly associated with increased drinking in all waves. Using logistic regression modeling, younger age was the most important predictor of increased alcohol consumption in each wave. Young adults in Wisconsin may be at higher risk for heavy drinking as these participants were more likely to increase alcohol use in all three surveys. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Alcohol Use and Misuse: A Public Health Perspective)
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7 pages, 318 KiB  
Article
Alcohol Policies Affect Drinking Patterns—A Potentially New and Harmful Drinking Pattern in Consumers of Small Vodka Bottles (SVB) in Poland
by Andrzej Silczuk, Małgorzata Mańczak and Jakub Owoc
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2022, 19(24), 17047; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph192417047 - 19 Dec 2022
Viewed by 1197
Abstract
Drinking alcohol has a vast and diverse impact on many aspects of people’s lives around the world. It is a major public health concern and is subject to numerous legal regulations and limitations. So far, little attention has been paid to if and [...] Read more.
Drinking alcohol has a vast and diverse impact on many aspects of people’s lives around the world. It is a major public health concern and is subject to numerous legal regulations and limitations. So far, little attention has been paid to if and how the volume of alcohol containers may affect drinking patterns. The widespread availability in recent years in Poland of small vodka bottles in various flavors and sizes was the rationale behind investigating whether the phenomenon may affect drinking patterns in any way. This was a 12-month cross-sectional survey study that started in January 2020. It included a total of 217 inpatients and outpatients that met the ICD-10 alcohol dependence criteria. The respondents were asked about their drinking habits and the use of small vodka bottles. It was found that respondents who regularly use small vodka bottles were much more likely to start their drinking early in the morning. The widespread availability and selection of small vodka bottles may encourage and facilitate drinking that starts early in the morning. It also makes it easier to maintain and control intoxication throughout the whole day, which could be considered another drinking pattern different from the other well-established ones, such as binge or continuous drinking. However, the design of this study makes it impossible to draw firm conclusions and further research is necessary. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Alcohol Use and Misuse: A Public Health Perspective)

Review

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16 pages, 724 KiB  
Review
Does Sport Participation Protect Adolescents from Alcohol Consumption? A Scoping Review
by Bartłomiej Walczak, Anna Walczak, Sandra Tricas-Sauras and Jakub Kołodziejczyk
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2023, 20(7), 5417; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph20075417 - 06 Apr 2023
Viewed by 1580
Abstract
(1) Background: Participation in youth sports is believed to protect against alcohol consumption. Although this concept has been questioned for over 40 years, the review of methodologically reliable evidence data is scarce. This review summarizes the state of knowledge on the association between [...] Read more.
(1) Background: Participation in youth sports is believed to protect against alcohol consumption. Although this concept has been questioned for over 40 years, the review of methodologically reliable evidence data is scarce. This review summarizes the state of knowledge on the association between practicing sports and alcohol consumption among adolescents (10–19 years old) and its moderators. (2) Methods: The review covers only random-sample-based and population research. A systematic search was conducted on Scopus, PubMed, and WoS, for articles published between 2000 and 2021. From the 1944 identified records, 139 advanced to the full-text review, and 32 to the final data extraction and quality review. (3) Results: About two-thirds of the studies, including all the longitudinal ones, showed a positive association between sport participation and alcohol consumption. The most common mediators were gender (males were at higher risk), discipline (odds for team sports were higher, but professionalization could reduce it), and race, which intersected with gender, putting white males at the highest risk. (4) Conclusions: Further longitudinal research based on random samples using standardized indicators, including psychological and social variables, may provide more consistent outcomes and allow for the identification of mediating mechanisms. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Alcohol Use and Misuse: A Public Health Perspective)
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