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Improving Healthcare Quality

A special issue of International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health (ISSN 1660-4601). This special issue belongs to the section "Health Care Sciences & Services".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 May 2024 | Viewed by 8812

Special Issue Editors

Department of Anesthesiology, Zealand University Hospital, 4600 Koege, Denmark
Interests: acute pain treatment and management; health care; immersive virtual reality
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals
Faculty of Physiotherapy and Nursing, Toledo Campus, University of Castilla-La Mancha, Avda Carlos III, s/n, 45071 Toledo, Spain
Interests: nursing; sexuality education; pregnant women
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Training in health sciences, which is increasingly important for a globalized world, requires professionals involved in multidisciplinary knowledge and trained to apply direct techniques to the patient/client. Among these, attention must be paid to the pain of the patient in all its ages and dimensions, without forgetting that new simulation techniques for direct treatment in emergencies and emergencies are of vital importance in the face of the new challenges of the 21st century. The current vision of health professionals must contemplate the changes that have taken place in our social, economic and political life, without neglecting culture, which highlights transnational problems in relation to health.

This Special Issue invites research within quality standards, in narrative, scoping, integrative, as well as systematic reviews with/without meta-analysis and original articles (qualitative/quantitative) dealing with topics such as the improvement of higher education leading to quality interprofessional practice in a system centered on all areas involving direct patient care, encouraging a change in attitudes towards teamwork focused on interprofessional care and professional practice. Such a situation facilitates and improves interprofessional education and practice in the face of patient-centered pharmacological and non-pharmacological treatment, promoting health systems and their management with interprofessional practices in a globalized world taking into account culture, ethnicity, and religion in care.

You may choose our Joint Special Issue in Healthcare.

Dr. Anja Edith Geisler
Dr. Sagrario Gómez-Cantarino
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2500 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • pain management
  • analgesics
  • pain evaluation
  • Mobile Emergency Team
  • outreach
  • immersive VR
  • pharmacological treatment
  • non-pharmacological treatment
  • comprehensive patient care
  • interprofessional education
  • care practice
  • health culture
  • health services management

Published Papers (5 papers)

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Research

10 pages, 351 KiB  
Article
Prioritizing Patient Safety: Analysis of the Procurement Process of Infusion Pumps in Spain
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2023, 20(24), 7179; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph20247179 - 14 Dec 2023
Viewed by 1225
Abstract
To understand whether patient safety and human factors are considered in healthcare technology procurement, we analyzed the case of infusion pumps as their use critically affects patient safety. We reviewed infusion pump procurements in the Spanish Public Sector Procurement Database. Sixty-three batches in [...] Read more.
To understand whether patient safety and human factors are considered in healthcare technology procurement, we analyzed the case of infusion pumps as their use critically affects patient safety. We reviewed infusion pump procurements in the Spanish Public Sector Procurement Database. Sixty-three batches in 29 tenders for supplying 12.224 volumetric and syringe infusion pumps and consumables for an overall budget of EUR 30.4 M were identified and reviewed. Concepts related to “ease of use” were identified in the selection requirements of 35 (55.6%) batches, as part of the criteria for the selection of pumps in 23 (36.5%) batches, related to “intuitiveness” in the selection requirements of 35 (55.6%) batches, and in the criteria in 10 (15.9%) batches. No method to evaluate the ease of use, intuitiveness, or usability was mentioned. A review of the procurement teams responsible for the evaluation of the tenders showed no reported human factors or patient safety expertise. We conclude that infusion pump procurement considers usability as a relevant criterion for selection. However, no human factor experts nor specific methods for evaluation of the technology in this field are usually defined. Potential room for refining the selection of healthcare technology to improve patient safety is detected. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Improving Healthcare Quality)
17 pages, 4703 KiB  
Article
Salus Platform: A Digital Health Solution Tool for Managing Syphilis Cases in Brazil—A Comparative Analysis
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2023, 20(7), 5258; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph20075258 - 24 Mar 2023
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 2561
Abstract
(1) Introduction: Syphilis is a sexually transmitted infection (STI) that constitutes a serious public health problem in Brazil and worldwide; (2) Methods: This was a descriptive and exploratory study that sought to analyze and compare the characteristics of Brazilian health systems with a [...] Read more.
(1) Introduction: Syphilis is a sexually transmitted infection (STI) that constitutes a serious public health problem in Brazil and worldwide; (2) Methods: This was a descriptive and exploratory study that sought to analyze and compare the characteristics of Brazilian health systems with a new platform (Salus) developed by the Laboratory of Technological Innovation in Health in the scope of notification and management of disease data, including syphilis. In addition, this analysis aimed to assess whether Salus fully meets the necessary data management fields and can be indicated as a tool to improve health management in the context of syphilis in Brazil. (3) Results: In this study, the Salus functionalities were demonstrated and compared with the current Brazilian systems by discovering the existing gaps in the evaluated systems. The gaps found may explain the delay in meeting demands, the difficulty of making routine therapeutic follow-ups, in addition to interference with the vital purpose of follow-up in the epidemiological surveillance of diseases. As a result, Salus demonstrates functionalities that surpass all others and meet case management demands in a superior way to the systems currently used in the country. (4) Conclusions: The Brazilian health information systems related to the response to syphilis do not fulfill the purpose for which they were developed. Instead, they contribute to the fragmentation of health data and information, delays in diagnosis, incomplete case management, and loss of data due to inconsistencies and inadequate reporting. In addition, they are systems without interconnection, which do not articulate epidemiological surveillance actions with primary health care. All these factors may be obscuring accurate data on syphilis in Brazil, resulting in high and unnecessary public spending and late care for users of the Unified Health System (SUS). Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Improving Healthcare Quality)
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13 pages, 357 KiB  
Article
Families with Mentally Ill Parents and Their Partners: Overlaps in Psychiatric Symptoms and Symptom Coping
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2023, 20(7), 5240; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph20075240 - 23 Mar 2023
Viewed by 1043
Abstract
Partners in families with a mentally ill parent often experience psychiatric symptoms themselves. Recent studies indicate that there might be overlaps in disorder-specific symptom areas between partners and spouses. This study aimed at examining associations in psychiatric symptoms and symptom coping in partners [...] Read more.
Partners in families with a mentally ill parent often experience psychiatric symptoms themselves. Recent studies indicate that there might be overlaps in disorder-specific symptom areas between partners and spouses. This study aimed at examining associations in psychiatric symptoms and symptom coping in partners in families with a mentally ill parent, e.g., having a psychiatric diagnosis according to the International Classification of Diseases (ICD-10). Furthermore, a moderation of the psychiatric symptoms of the parent with a mental illness on the association in symptom coping was assumed. Families with at least one parent with a mental illness were recruited into the longitudinal “Children of Mentally Ill Parents” (CHIMPS) trial at seven clinical centers in Germany and Switzerland. In total, 139 families were included in the current study. Psychiatric symptoms were assessed using the Brief Symptom Inventory (BSI), Clinical Global Impression scale (CGI), Global Assessment of Functioning (GAF), and Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ), while symptom coping strategies were measured using the Freiburger Fragebogen zur Krankheitsverarbeitung (FKV). Regression analyses have indicated an association in psychiatric symptoms between mentally ill parents and their partners concerning psychosocial functioning, somatic, and stress-related symptoms. Additionally, one symptom coping strategy of the partners was predicted by the same strategy of the parent with a mental illness. The results emphasize the importance of screening and providing support to parents burdened by the mental disorder of their partners, especially regarding the children in these partnerships. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Improving Healthcare Quality)
11 pages, 332 KiB  
Article
Piloting a Nurse-Led Critical Care Outreach Service to Pre-Empt Medical Emergency Team Calls and Facilitate Staff Learning
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2023, 20(5), 4214; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph20054214 - 27 Feb 2023
Viewed by 1279
Abstract
A nurse-led critical care outreach service (NLCCOS) can support staff education and decision making in the wards, managing at-risk patients with ward nurses to avoid further deterioration. We aimed to investigate the characteristics of patients identified as at-risk, the types of treatments they [...] Read more.
A nurse-led critical care outreach service (NLCCOS) can support staff education and decision making in the wards, managing at-risk patients with ward nurses to avoid further deterioration. We aimed to investigate the characteristics of patients identified as at-risk, the types of treatments they required to prevent deterioration, the education initiated by the NLCCOS, and the perceived experiences of ward nurses. This prospective observational pilot study using mixed methods took place in one medical and one surgical ward at a university hospital in Denmark. Participants were patients nominated as at-risk by head nurses in each ward, the ward nurses, and nurses from the NLCCOS. In total, 100 patients were reviewed, 51 medical and 49 surgical patients, over a six-month period. Most patients (70%) visited by the NLCCOS had a compromised respiratory status, and ward nurses received teaching and advice regarding interventions. Sixty-one surveys were collected from ward nurses on their learning experience. Over 90% (n = 55) of nurses believed they had learned from, and were more confident with, managing patients following the experience. The main educational areas were respiratory therapy, invasive procedures, medications, and benefits of mobilization. Further research needs to measure the impact of the intervention on patient outcomes and MET call frequency over time in larger samples. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Improving Healthcare Quality)
11 pages, 651 KiB  
Article
A National Quality Improvement Program on Ultrasound Department in China: A Controlled Cohort Study of 1297 Public Hospitals
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2023, 20(1), 397; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph20010397 - 27 Dec 2022
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1984
Abstract
Providing high-quality medical services is of great importance in the imaging department, as there is a growing focus on personal health, and high-quality services can lead to improved patient outcomes. Many quality improvement (QI) programs with good guidance and fine measurement for improvement [...] Read more.
Providing high-quality medical services is of great importance in the imaging department, as there is a growing focus on personal health, and high-quality services can lead to improved patient outcomes. Many quality improvement (QI) programs with good guidance and fine measurement for improvement have been reported to be effective. In order to improve the quality of ultrasound departments in China, we conducted this study of a national quality improvement program. A total of 1297 public hospitals were included in this QI program on ultrasound departments in China from 2017 to 2019. The effect of this QI program was investigated, and potential factors, including hospital level and local economic development, were considered. The outcome indicators, the positive rate and diagnostic accuracy, were improved significantly between the two phases (positive rate, 2017 vs. 2019: 66.21% vs. 73.91%, p < 0.001; diagnostic accuracy, 2017 vs. 2019: 85.37% vs. 89.74%; p < 0.001). Additionally, they were improved in secondary and tertiary hospitals, with the improvement in secondary hospitals being greater. Notably, the enhancement of diagnostic accuracy in low-GDP provinces was almost 20%, which was more significant than the enhancement in high-GDP provinces. However, the important structural indicator, the doctor-to-patient ratio, decreased from 1.05:10,000 to 0.96:10,000 (p = 0.026). This study suggests that the national ultrasound QI program improved the outcome indicators, with secondary-level hospitals improving more than tertiary hospitals and low-GDP provinces improving more than high-GDP regions. Additionally, as there is a growing need for ultrasound examinations, more ultrasound doctors are needed in China. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Improving Healthcare Quality)
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