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Sustainable Land Use under the Target of Carbon Peaking and Carbon Neutralization

A special issue of International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health (ISSN 1660-4601). This special issue belongs to the section "Environmental Sciences".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 May 2024) | Viewed by 3409

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
College of Public Administration, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430074, China
Interests: sustainable development; land use policy; food security
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

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Guest Editor
Department of Land Management, Huazhong Agricultural University, Wuhan 430070, China
Interests: urban–rural development and land use; land consolidation; sustainable development policies
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

As the basis of many human activities and the most important means of production, the use of land resources is one of the main sources of carbon emissions. At the same time, dense forests and vegetation based on land resources, even crops, are also important modes of carbon sequestering. Obviously, sustainable land use is an important measure and means of carbon emission reduction. Aiming for the goal of carbon peaking and carbon neutralization put forward by countries around the world, the following questions have become the focus of social concern and important research questions for scholars: How can we scientifically plan and use land space and achieve effective governance of land space? How can we rationally protect and utilize cultivated land resources and continuously improve the level of global food security? How can we realize the economical and intensive use of urban construction land and effectively improve the eco-efficiency of urban land use? How can we carry out comprehensive land consolidation across the region to help the integrated development of urban and rural society? In short, how can we realize the sustainable development of human society and economy through the sustainable use of land resources?

This Special Issue invites papers addressing these questions, especially those with high academic standards and practical concerns about providing the best sustainable land use solutions.

You may choose our Joint Special Issue in Land.

Prof. Dr. Xinhai Lu
Dr. Danling Chen
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2500 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • global climate change
  • carbon peaking and carbon neutralization
  • environmental regulation
  • land consolidation
  • food security
  • sustainable land use
  • land use eco-efficiency
  • spatio-temporal evolution
  • integrated development of urban and rural society
  • economical and intensive use of urban land

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

19 pages, 761 KiB  
Article
How Does Spatial Injustice Affect Residents’ Policy Acceptance of the Economic–Social–Ecological Objectives of Construction Land Reduction?
by Keqiang Wang, Jianglin Lu and Hongmei Liu
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2023, 20(4), 2847; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph20042847 - 6 Feb 2023
Viewed by 1160
Abstract
Construction land reduction (CLR) is a policy innovation for Shanghai to explore high-quality economic development, but it will also lead to spatial injustice in the implementation process. Although the literature on spatial injustice and CLR is increasing, very little is known about the [...] Read more.
Construction land reduction (CLR) is a policy innovation for Shanghai to explore high-quality economic development, but it will also lead to spatial injustice in the implementation process. Although the literature on spatial injustice and CLR is increasing, very little is known about the influence of spatial injustice in CLR on residents’ policy acceptance of the economic–social–ecological objectives of CLR. To fill the knowledge gap, this study uses micro-survey data to identify the factors that influence residents’ policy acceptance of the economic–social–ecological objectives of CLR. Results show that: (1) Spatial injustice in CLR significantly reduces residents’ policy acceptance of the social and ecological objectives of CLR. (2) The locational disadvantage of villages significantly reduces residents’ policy acceptance of the ecological objectives of CLR. (3) The more educated the residents are, the more they recognize the social and ecological objectives of CLR. (4) The higher the percentage of household workers, the more residents endorse the economic and social objectives of CLR. (5) Compared with ordinary residents, cadres are more accepting of the economic objectives of CLR. (6) Robustness tests support the findings of this study. The findings of this study provide insights for sustainable CLR policy reform. Full article
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18 pages, 3766 KiB  
Article
Research on the Effect of Manufacturing Agglomeration on Green Use Efficiency of Industrial Land
by Yuan Wang, Anlu Zhang, Min Min, Ke Zhao, Weiyan Hu and Fude Qin
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2023, 20(2), 1575; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph20021575 - 15 Jan 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1413
Abstract
Manufacturing agglomeration (MA) is an important way to achieve high-quality industrial development and promote land use efficiency in China. However, there is a lack of research on the relationship between MA and the green use efficiency of industrial land (GUEIL). Based on the [...] Read more.
Manufacturing agglomeration (MA) is an important way to achieve high-quality industrial development and promote land use efficiency in China. However, there is a lack of research on the relationship between MA and the green use efficiency of industrial land (GUEIL). Based on the panel data of 279 prefecture-level cities in China, from 2004 to 2019, this study analyzes the spatial and temporal differentiation characteristics of MA and GUEIL, then empirically analyzes the impact of MA on GUEIL. The results show that: (1) during the study period, the national MA levels showed a slight decline, followed by a small increase. In addition, the inter-regional differences are mainly characterized as eastern region > central region > northeast region > western region. (2) The national and regional GUEIL showed a trend of increasing, slightly decreasing, and then increasing again. The overall regional differences in efficiency show the characteristics of: eastern region > central region > western region > northeastern region. (3) At the national scale, MA had a “U-shaped” relationship with GUEIL; at the regional scale, MA had a significant “U-shaped” effect on GUEIL in the northeast, central and western regions, while having a single negative effect in the eastern region. Finally, this study provides suggestions for optimizing the manufacturing structure and improving the GUEIL. Full article
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