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Focusing on the Cognitive Component of Subjective Well-Being: The Relationship between Life Satisfaction and Psychological Distress

A special issue of International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health (ISSN 1660-4601). This special issue belongs to the section "Behavioral and Mental Health".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 June 2024 | Viewed by 1734

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Department of Psychology, University of the Western Cape, Bellville 7530, South Africa
Interests: health psychology; protective factors in the stress-psychological distress relationship; mental health; organizational factors in psychological well-being; validation of psychological instruments

E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Psychology, University of the Western Cape, Bellville 7530, South Africa
Interests: trauma and PTSD; mental health; psychology; psychopathology

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Research is pointing to an alarming increase in mental health problems, largely exacerbated by the COVID-19 pandemic. Being satisfied with one’s life and promoting satisfaction with life hold potential for countering the adverse effects of the negative indices of psychological distress. Life satisfaction is regarded as the cognitive component of subjective well-being. In the context of the growing mental health “pandemic”, the correlating and protective factors of the negative indices of mental health should be considered as a priority. Life satisfaction is an important pillar within the positive psychology movement (Seligman and Csikszentmihalyi, 2014) and focuses on psychological strength. Seligman (2010) bemoaned psychology’s obsession with “what is wrong with life: suicide, depression, schizophrenia, and all the brick walls that can fall on you” and the ways in which (we) “tried to create a field in which we asked the question ‘What makes life worth living, and how can we build it?’” This Special Issue calls for papers that focus on the relationship between life satisfaction and indices of psychological distress, as well as the potential protective roles that life satisfaction plays with regard to the negative indices of mental well-being in different populations.

Prof. Dr. Tyrone Brian Pretorius
Prof. Dr. Anita Padmanabhanunni
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2500 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • life satisfaction
  • psychological distress
  • depression
  • anxiety
  • loneliness
  • mental health and well-being

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

11 pages, 1001 KiB  
Article
Satisfied with Life? The Protective Function of Life Satisfaction in the Relationship between Perceived Stress and Negative Mental Health Outcomes
by Anita Padmanabhanunni, Tyrone B. Pretorius and Serena Ann Isaacs
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2023, 20(18), 6777; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph20186777 - 18 Sep 2023
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1348
Abstract
Life satisfaction is a key index of well-being, yet few studies have examined its role as a protective factor in the context of the COVID-19 pandemic. The current study expands the research in this area through an examination of the role of life [...] Read more.
Life satisfaction is a key index of well-being, yet few studies have examined its role as a protective factor in the context of the COVID-19 pandemic. The current study expands the research in this area through an examination of the role of life satisfaction in the relationship between perceived stress and negative indices of mental health. Participants were university students (N = 322) who completed the Perceived Stress Scale, the Satisfaction with Life Scale, and short forms of the trait scale of the Spielberger State-Trait Anxiety Inventory, the Center for Epidemiological Depression Scale, and the Beck Hopelessness Scale. The results indicate that life satisfaction had a health-sustaining effect on indices of well-being. It also moderated the relationship between perceived stress, on the one hand, and anxiety and hopelessness, on the other hand. Further, life satisfaction played a partial mediating role in the relationship between perceived stress and indices of mental health. The findings suggest that life satisfaction could be a protective factor in the context of stressful life events. Cultivating life satisfaction through mindfulness training and the enhancement of gratitude could potentially sustain mental health. Full article
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