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Music for Health Care and Well-Being

A special issue of International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health (ISSN 1660-4601). This special issue belongs to the section "Health Behavior, Chronic Disease and Health Promotion".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 July 2023) | Viewed by 36150

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Department of Music Therapy, Graduate School, Ewha Womans University, Seoul 03760, Republic of Korea
Interests: music emotion; music psychotherapy; music perception and cognition
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

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Guest Editor
Department of Music Therapy, Graduate School, Ewha Womans University, Seoul 03760, Korea
Interests: music therapy; autism spectrum disorder; children with developmental disability; family-centered care; interpersonal synchronization

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Guest Editor
Faculty of Music, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON M5S 1A1, Canada
Interests: understanding in music for pain; dementia; community music; caregivers; palliative care
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Since ancient times, music has been acknowledged as a therapeutic medium for humans, providing diverse benefits which affect human emotion, cognition, and behavior. Through different stages of human history, music has served as an essential medium that has ensured good quality of life and well-being, adding to the scientific evidence of its efficacy with research development. Rigorous and integrative discoveries of the neural mechanisms underlying complex music-related behaviors have further promoted new advancements across multidisciplinary research and approaches.

Music is a common asset that provides both collective experiences, bringing people together, and personal connections through emotional resonance and empathy.

During the worldwide COVID-19 pandemic, the therapeutic benefits of music have become clearer, filling in the physically distanced space emotionally. Many studies have reported the positive effects of music on relieving and alleviating negative emotions, anxiety, and unmotivated thoughts, leading to functional behaviors and social integration. Communities have promoted various virtual music programs in which music could be a common interest, promoting listening, singing, playing, and moving, despite limitations on physical interactions, and combining visual, auditory, and kinesthetic experiences.

The scope of this Special Issue is to share, exchange, and advance ideas on how music brings about positive changes in people’s thoughts, feelings, emotions, and behaviors from therapeutic, recreational, educational, and medical aspects. The included information will intrigue researchers, academics, musicians, and health-related professionals seeking to learn how music can be used as a healing medium, catalyst, prompt, and therapeutic tool in various fields of practice.

Prof. Dr. Hyun Ju Chong
Prof. Dr. Ga Eul Yoo
Dr. Amy Clements-Cortés
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2500 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • music therapy
  • music medicine
  • community music therapy
  • music emotion regulation
  • music psychotherapy
  • music rehabilitation
  • music technology
  • music and digital health
  • telehealth music therapy/education

Published Papers (15 papers)

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Research

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22 pages, 415 KiB  
Article
An Eight-Week Zen Meditation and Music Programme for Mindfulness and Happiness: Qualitative Content Analysis
by Mi Hyang Hwang, Leslie Bunt and Catherine Warner
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2023, 20(23), 7140; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph20237140 - 04 Dec 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1593
Abstract
Mental wellness can be related to healthier living, the learning process and working environments for people in the university community. A wide range of mental wellness programmes have been explored to provide students with pleasant and satisfying experiences. The purpose of this study [...] Read more.
Mental wellness can be related to healthier living, the learning process and working environments for people in the university community. A wide range of mental wellness programmes have been explored to provide students with pleasant and satisfying experiences. The purpose of this study is to explore the effects of integrating Zen meditation and music listening on the mindfulness and happiness levels of university music therapy students. A qualitative methodology was used, and data were collected through surveys and semi-structured interviews. To investigate various aspects of data regarding the role of the meditation and music (MM) programme for mindfulness and happiness, this study used thematic analysis within a qualitative research design. The findings of this study suggest that the 8-week Mindfulness Meditation (MM) programme is a potential approach for enhancing mindfulness, happiness and stress management. These results carry broader implications, particularly in terms of supporting mental health resources in higher education. Furthermore, the study contributes to the ongoing discussion regarding the positive impact of combining meditation and music to promote mental well-being. This integrated approach has the potential to strengthen coping strategies and further promote the integration of music and meditation practices in various contexts, including higher education. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Music for Health Care and Well-Being)
13 pages, 3455 KiB  
Article
Does the Sound of a Singing Bowl Synchronize Meditational Brainwaves in the Listeners?
by Seong-Chan Kim and Min-Joo Choi
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2023, 20(12), 6180; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph20126180 - 19 Jun 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1595
Abstract
This study aims to verify if the beating sound of a singing bowl synchronizes and activates brain waves during listening. The singing bowl used in this experiment produce beats at a frequency of 6.68 Hz, while it decays exponentially and lasts for about [...] Read more.
This study aims to verify if the beating sound of a singing bowl synchronizes and activates brain waves during listening. The singing bowl used in this experiment produce beats at a frequency of 6.68 Hz, while it decays exponentially and lasts for about 50 s. Brain waves were measured for 5 min in the F3 and F4 regions of seventeen participants (eight males and nine females, average age 25.2) who heard the beating singing bowl sounds. The experimental results showed that the increases (up to ~251%) in the spectral magnitudes of the brain waves were dominant at the beat frequency compared to those of any other clinical brain wave frequency bands. The observed synchronized activation of the brain waves at the beating sound frequency supports that the singing bowl sound may effectively facilitate meditation and relaxation, considering that the beat frequency belongs to the theta wave region which increases in the relaxed meditation state. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Music for Health Care and Well-Being)
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15 pages, 1024 KiB  
Article
“Follow the Musical Road”: Selecting Appropriate Music Experiences for People with Dementia Living in the Community
by Lisa Kelly, Amy Clements-Cortés, Bill Ahessy, Ita Richardson and Hilary Moss
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2023, 20(10), 5818; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph20105818 - 13 May 2023
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 3107
Abstract
There are many music experiences for people with dementia and their caregivers including but not limited to individualized playlists, music and singing groups, dementia-inclusive choirs and concerts, and music therapy. While the benefits of these music experiences have been well documented, an understanding [...] Read more.
There are many music experiences for people with dementia and their caregivers including but not limited to individualized playlists, music and singing groups, dementia-inclusive choirs and concerts, and music therapy. While the benefits of these music experiences have been well documented, an understanding of the differences between them is often absent. However, knowledge of and distinction between these experiences are crucial to people with dementia and their family members, caregivers, and health practitioners to ensure a comprehensive music approach to dementia care is provided. Considering the array of music experiences available, choosing the most appropriate music experience can be challenging. This is an exploratory phenomenological study with significant Public and Patient Involvement (PPI). Through consultation with PPI contributors with dementia via an online focus group and senior music therapists working in dementia care via online semi-structured interviews, this paper aims to identify these distinctions and to address this challenge by providing a visual step-by-step guide. This guide can be consulted when choosing an appropriate music experience for a person with dementia living in the community. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Music for Health Care and Well-Being)
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17 pages, 1601 KiB  
Article
International Music Therapists’ Perceptions and Experiences in Telehealth Music Therapy Provision
by Amy Clements-Cortés, Marija Pranjić, David Knott, Melissa Mercadal-Brotons, Allison Fuller, Lisa Kelly, Indra Selvarajah and Rebecca Vaudreuil
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2023, 20(8), 5580; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph20085580 - 19 Apr 2023
Cited by 6 | Viewed by 2921
Abstract
The use of telehealth within music therapy practice has increased through necessity in recent years. To contribute to the evolving evidence base, this current study on Telehealth Music Therapy (TMT) was undertaken to investigate the telehealth provision experiences of music therapists internationally. Participants [...] Read more.
The use of telehealth within music therapy practice has increased through necessity in recent years. To contribute to the evolving evidence base, this current study on Telehealth Music Therapy (TMT) was undertaken to investigate the telehealth provision experiences of music therapists internationally. Participants completed an anonymous online cross-sectional survey covering demographics, clinical practice, telehealth provision, and telehealth perceptions. Descriptive and inferential statistics, in combination with thematic analysis, were used to analyze the data. A total of 572 music therapists from 29 countries experienced in providing TMT took part in this study. The results showed that the overall number of clinical hours (TMT and in-person hours combined) declined due to the pandemic. Participants also reported reduced perceived success rates in utilizing both live and pre-recorded music in TMT sessions when compared to in-person sessions. Although many music therapists rose to the challenges posed by the pandemic by incorporating TMT delivery modes, there was no clear agreement on whether TMT has more benefits than drawbacks; however, reported benefits included increased client access and caregiver involvement. Furthermore, a correlation analysis revealed moderate-to-strong positive associations between respondents who perceived TMT to have more benefits than drawbacks, proficiency at administering assessments over telehealth, and perceived likelihood of using telehealth in the future. Regarding the influence of primary theoretical orientation and work setting, respondents who selected music psychotherapy as a primary theoretical orientation had more experience providing TMT prior to the pandemic while those primarily working in private practice were most inclined to continue TMT services post-pandemic. Benefits and drawbacks are discussed and future recommendations for TMT are provided. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Music for Health Care and Well-Being)
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16 pages, 853 KiB  
Article
Effects of Live Music on the Perception of Noise in the SICU/PICU: A Patient, Caregiver, and Medical Staff Environmental Study
by Andrew Rossetti, Joanne Loewy, Wen Chang-Lit, Nienke H. van Dokkum, Erik Baumann, Gabrielle Bouissou, John Mondanaro, Todd O’Connor, Gabriela Asch-Ortiz and Hayato Mitaka
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2023, 20(4), 3499; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph20043499 - 16 Feb 2023
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 2116
Abstract
Intensive Care Units (ICUs) require a multidisciplinary team that consists of, but is not limited to, intensivists (clinicians who specialize in critical illness care), pharmacists and nurses, respiratory care therapists, and other medical consultants from a broad range of specialties. The complex and [...] Read more.
Intensive Care Units (ICUs) require a multidisciplinary team that consists of, but is not limited to, intensivists (clinicians who specialize in critical illness care), pharmacists and nurses, respiratory care therapists, and other medical consultants from a broad range of specialties. The complex and demanding critical care environment provides few opportunities for patients and personal and professional caregivers to evaluate how sound effects them. A growing body of literature attests to noise’s adverse influence on patients’ sleep, and high sound levels are a source of staff stress, as noise is an ubiquitous and noxious stimuli. Vulnerable patients have a low threshold tolerance to audio-induced stress. Despite these indications, peak sound levels often register as high, as can ventilators, and the documented noise levels in hospitals continue to rise. This baseline study, carried out in two hospitals’ Surgical and Pediatric Intensive Care Units, measured the effects of live music on the perception of noise through surveying patients, personal caregivers and staff in randomized conditions of no music, and music as provided by music therapists through our hospital system’s environmental music therapy program. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Music for Health Care and Well-Being)
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16 pages, 1089 KiB  
Article
The Influence of Home-Based Music Therapy Interventions on Relationship Quality in Couples Living with Dementia—An Adapted Convergent Mixed Methods Study
by Kristi Stedje, Tone Sæther Kvamme, Kjersti Johansson, Tanara Vieira Sousa, Helen Odell-Miller, Karette Annie Stensæth, Anna A. Bukowska, Jeanette Tamplin, Thomas Wosch and Felicity Anne Baker
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2023, 20(4), 2863; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph20042863 - 06 Feb 2023
Cited by 8 | Viewed by 3148
Abstract
Relationship quality is important for well-being and quality of life in couples living with dementia. Home-based music therapy interventions may be conducted with the aim of enhancing relationship quality. However, the effects or influences of such interventions are only briefly investigated in previous [...] Read more.
Relationship quality is important for well-being and quality of life in couples living with dementia. Home-based music therapy interventions may be conducted with the aim of enhancing relationship quality. However, the effects or influences of such interventions are only briefly investigated in previous studies. This study’s aim was to identify how a 12-week home-based music therapy intervention may influence relationship quality in couples living with dementia, through an adapted convergent mixed methods design. In this case, 68 participating couples from the HOMESIDE RCT study, and four individually recruited couples, received the music therapy intervention. Relationship quality for all participants was measured by the standardized Quality of Caregiver-Patient Relationship scale, and qualitative interviews were conducted with the four individually recruited participants at baseline and post intervention. Quantitative analysis indicated no statistically significant intervention effect. However, relationship quality remained stable over the intervention period. The qualitative analysis identified that the music therapy interventions primarily led to positive emotions, closeness, intimacy, and communication between the persons with dementia and their care partners. Intervention influences could also be ambiguous, as sharing music experiences might involve a risk of evoking vulnerabilities or negative emotional responses. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Music for Health Care and Well-Being)
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12 pages, 363 KiB  
Article
Criterion-Related Validation of a Music-Based Attention Assessment for Individuals with Traumatic Brain Injury
by Eunju Jeong and Susan J. Ireland
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2022, 19(23), 16285; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph192316285 - 05 Dec 2022
Viewed by 1738
Abstract
The music-based attention assessment (MAA) is a melody contour identification task that evaluates different types of attention. Previous studies have examined the psychometric and physiological validity of the MAA across various age groups in clinical and typical populations. The purpose of this study [...] Read more.
The music-based attention assessment (MAA) is a melody contour identification task that evaluates different types of attention. Previous studies have examined the psychometric and physiological validity of the MAA across various age groups in clinical and typical populations. The purpose of this study was to confirm the MAA’s criterion validity in individuals with traumatic brain injury (TBI) and to correlate this with standardized neuropsychological measurements. The MAA and various neurocognitive tests (i.e., the Wechsler adult intelligence scale DST, Delis–Kaplan executive functioning scale color-word interference test, and Conner’s continuous performance test) were administered to 38 patients within two weeks prior to or post to the MAA administration. Significant correlations between MAA and neurocognitive batteries were found, indicating the potential of MAA as a valid measure of different types of attention deficits. An additional multiple regression analysis revealed that MAA was a significant factor in predicting attention ability. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Music for Health Care and Well-Being)
14 pages, 1940 KiB  
Article
Differential Background Music as Attentional Resources Interacting with Cognitive Control
by Ga Eul Yoo, Sujin Lee, Aimee Jeehae Kim, Seung Hong Choi, Hyun Ju Chong and Sunghyouk Park
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2022, 19(22), 15094; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph192215094 - 16 Nov 2022
Viewed by 2309
Abstract
We examined the effects of background music on cognitive task performances using different musical arrangements from an excerpt of Mozart’s Piano Sonata K.448. The participants were 126 university students: 70 music majors and 56 nonmusic majors. Three types of musical arrangements were used [...] Read more.
We examined the effects of background music on cognitive task performances using different musical arrangements from an excerpt of Mozart’s Piano Sonata K.448. The participants were 126 university students: 70 music majors and 56 nonmusic majors. Three types of musical arrangements were used as background conditions: rhythm-only, melody, and original music conditions. Participants were asked to perform cognitive tasks in the presence of each music condition. The participants’ percentage of completed items and accuracy on these tasks were compared for music and nonmusic majors, controlling for the effect of perceived level of arousal and their performance during no background music. Whether a participant’s perceptions of background music predicted their cognitive performance was also analyzed. We found that music majors demonstrated decreased task performance for the original background condition, while nonmusic majors demonstrated no significant differences in performance across the arrangements. When pitch or rhythm information was modified, emotional valence and arousal were perceived differently. Perception of the complexity of the background music depending on the arrangement type differed between music majors and nonmusic majors. While the perceived complexity significantly predicted nonmusic majors’ cognitive performance, its predictive effect was not found in music majors. The findings imply that perceptions of musical arrangements in terms of expectancy and complexity can be critical factors in determining how arrangements affect concurrent cognitive activity, while suggesting that music itself is not a facilitating or detrimental factor for cognitive performance. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Music for Health Care and Well-Being)
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11 pages, 676 KiB  
Article
Decomposing the Effects of Familiarity with Music Cues on Stride Length and Variability in Persons with Parkinson’s Disease: On the Role of Covariates
by Kyoung Shin Park
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2022, 19(17), 10793; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph191710793 - 30 Aug 2022
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 1355
Abstract
This study aimed to determine the role of cognitive and affective responses to music cues in modulating the effects of familiarity with music on stride length and stride-to-stride variability in people with Parkinson’s disease (PD). Using multilevel modeling, people with PD’s spatiotemporal gait [...] Read more.
This study aimed to determine the role of cognitive and affective responses to music cues in modulating the effects of familiarity with music on stride length and stride-to-stride variability in people with Parkinson’s disease (PD). Using multilevel modeling, people with PD’s spatiotemporal gait parameters and self-reported ratings of familiarity, enjoyment, cognitive and physical demand, beats salience of music cues after each walking trial, as well as music reward, were analyzed. Our findings indicate that (1) condition-varying perceived enjoyment and beat salience are positively associated with increased stride length; (2) participants with a greater music reward for mood regulation and emotion evocation show greater stride length changes compared with those with less music reward; (3) condition-varying perceived enjoyment is positively associated with decreases in stride-to-stride variability; and (4) participants with lower cognitive demand of walking with music cues and higher beat salience show lower stride-to-stride variability compared with those with higher cognitive demand and lower beat salience. These results provide behavioral evidence of independent and interactive influences of cognitive and affective responses to music cues on spatiotemporal gait parameters in people with PD. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Music for Health Care and Well-Being)
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Review

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34 pages, 901 KiB  
Review
Implementation and Strategies of Community Music Activities for Well-Being: A Scoping Review of the Literature
by Soo Yon Yi and Aimee Jeehae Kim
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2023, 20(3), 2606; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph20032606 - 31 Jan 2023
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 2407
Abstract
The benefits of community music activities for promoting well-being have been well recognized in previous literature. However, due to their wide variability and flexible approaches, a comprehensive understanding of the research and practice of community music activities for well-being promotion is sparse. The [...] Read more.
The benefits of community music activities for promoting well-being have been well recognized in previous literature. However, due to their wide variability and flexible approaches, a comprehensive understanding of the research and practice of community music activities for well-being promotion is sparse. The purpose of this scoping review was to synthesize published literature pertaining to community music activities for well-being promotion and identify key implementation characteristics and strategies to inform future practice and research. Studies of community music activities that investigated well-being outcomes in participants of all ages and conditions were eligible for inclusion. Through electronic database and manual searches, a total of 45 studies were identified and included in the analysis. The main findings showed that community music activities for well-being were characterized by a wide range of populations and applications, collaborative work, an emphasis on social components, and musical accomplishments. However, this variability also revealed a lack of consistent and thorough information as well as diversity in well-being conception across studies. The review offers practical recommendations for future research and practice based on the current findings. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Music for Health Care and Well-Being)
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19 pages, 1221 KiB  
Review
Singing Interventions in Pulmonary Rehabilitation: A Scoping Review
by Soo Ji Kim, Myung Sun Yeo and So Yeon Kim
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2023, 20(2), 1383; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph20021383 - 12 Jan 2023
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 2224
Abstract
(1) Background: Individuals with pulmonary disease need intensive and consistent rehabilitation due to their high risk for serious illness and long-term complications. The purpose of this scoping review was to provide a comprehensive analysis of relevant research regarding the use of singing in [...] Read more.
(1) Background: Individuals with pulmonary disease need intensive and consistent rehabilitation due to their high risk for serious illness and long-term complications. The purpose of this scoping review was to provide a comprehensive analysis of relevant research regarding the use of singing in pulmonary rehabilitation. (2) Methods: A systematic literature search was performed using the PsycINFO, CINAHL, PubMed, and Web of Science databases. A search for studies that employed singing in pulmonary rehabilitation for patients with pulmonary disease was conducted. (3) Results: Studies that met the selection criteria were summarized and analyzed. Twenty-seven studies were included in the final analysis. Results showed that research using singing in pulmonary rehabilitation generally employed an intervention with structured tasks and additional home practice or socialization time. However, the singing procedure in each intervention was not always specifically described and the findings were inconsistent. (4) Conclusions: Programmed singing interventions can support lung health and be an effective component of pulmonary rehabilitation. The therapeutic singing method in relation to respiratory exercises should be integrated into the main activity in the intervention. Overall, singing has physical and psychosocial effects, leading to improvements in symptoms, but more research is necessary to ensure that the respiratory needs of people with pulmonary disease are adequately met. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Music for Health Care and Well-Being)
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20 pages, 4621 KiB  
Review
Effects of Music-Based Interventions on Motor and Non-Motor Symptoms in Patients with Parkinson’s Disease: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis
by Hyunjung Lee and Bumsuk Ko
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2023, 20(2), 1046; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph20021046 - 06 Jan 2023
Cited by 5 | Viewed by 2914
Abstract
This systematic review and meta-analysis examined previous studies on music-based interventions for individuals with Parkinson’s disease (PD). The effectiveness of the interventions on various motor and non-motor outcomes was evaluated. This review was conducted by searching PubMed, CINAHL, PsycINFO, and Cochrane Library CENTRAL [...] Read more.
This systematic review and meta-analysis examined previous studies on music-based interventions for individuals with Parkinson’s disease (PD). The effectiveness of the interventions on various motor and non-motor outcomes was evaluated. This review was conducted by searching PubMed, CINAHL, PsycINFO, and Cochrane Library CENTRAL prior to June 2022 for randomized controlled trial (RCT) and controlled clinical trial (CCT) studies published in English. Data were expressed as weighted/standardized mean difference (MD/SMD) with 95% confidence intervals (CI). I2 index was used for heterogeneity. The initial search identified 745 studies, and 13 studies involving 417 participants with PD which met the inclusion criteria included in this review. The results of the meta-analysis revealed that music-based interventions can significantly improve walking velocity (MD = 0.12, 95% CI = 0.07~0.16, p < 0.00001), stride length (MD = 0.04, 95% CI = 0.02~0.07, p = 0.002), and mobility (MD = −1.05, 95% CI = −1.53~−0.57, p < 0.0001). However, the results did not support significant effects for music-based interventions on cadence (MD = 3.21, 95% CI = −4.15~10.57, p = 0.39), cognitive flexibility (MD = 20.91, 95% CI = −10.62~52.44, p = 0.19), inhibition (SMD = 0.07, 95% CI = −0.40~0.55, p = 0.76), and quality of life (SMD = −0.68, 95% CI= −1.68~0.32, p = 0.18). The findings suggest that music-based interventions are effective for the improvement of some motor symptoms, but evidence for non-motor symptoms is limited. Further high-quality studies with a larger sample size are required to obtain the robust effects of music-based interventions on various outcomes among patients with PD. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Music for Health Care and Well-Being)
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27 pages, 706 KiB  
Review
A Systematic Review of Scientific Studies on the Effects of Music in People with Personality Disorders
by Rowan Haslam, Annie Heiderscheit and Hubertus Himmerich
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2022, 19(23), 15434; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph192315434 - 22 Nov 2022
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 2665
Abstract
Personality Disorders (PDs) are psychiatric conditions involving maladaptive personality traits and behaviours. Previous research has shown that musical preferences and the use of music may be related to personality traits. Additionally, music therapy is increasingly being used as a treatment option for people [...] Read more.
Personality Disorders (PDs) are psychiatric conditions involving maladaptive personality traits and behaviours. Previous research has shown that musical preferences and the use of music may be related to personality traits. Additionally, music therapy is increasingly being used as a treatment option for people with PDs. Using the PRISMA guidelines, a systematic literature search was undertaken using three databases: PubMed, Web of Science, and PsycInfo. The following search terms were used: PubMed: “personality disorder” AND (music OR “music therapy”); Web of Science (advanced search): TS = (personality disorder) AND TS = (music or “music therapy”); PsycInfo: “personality disorder” AND (music OR “music therapy”). A total of 24 studies were included in this review and summarised into four categories: music preference, music therapy, music performance, and music imagery, all in relation to PDs or traits associated with PDs. The analysis found that individuals with personality traits associated with PDs may prefer different types or genres of music or interact with music differently than those without these traits. Additionally, music therapy (MT) was found to offer a potentially useful treatment option for PDs. The power of these findings was limited by the small number of included studies. This review offers a useful foundation upon which further research looking at MT as a potential treatment option for PDs can be built. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Music for Health Care and Well-Being)
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Other

Jump to: Research, Review

26 pages, 814 KiB  
Systematic Review
The Effects of Music-Based Interventions for Pain and Anxiety Management during Vaginal Labour and Caesarean Delivery: A Systematic Review and Narrative Synthesis of Randomised Controlled Trials
by Amy Rose Hunter, Annie Heiderscheit, Megan Galbally, Davide Gravina, Hiba Mutwalli and Hubertus Himmerich
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2023, 20(23), 7120; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph20237120 - 29 Nov 2023
Viewed by 1920
Abstract
Music-based interventions are not physically invasive, they usually have minimal side effects, and they are increasingly being implemented during the birthing process for pain and anxiety relief. The aim of this systematic review is to summarise and evaluate published, randomised controlled trials (RCTs) [...] Read more.
Music-based interventions are not physically invasive, they usually have minimal side effects, and they are increasingly being implemented during the birthing process for pain and anxiety relief. The aim of this systematic review is to summarise and evaluate published, randomised controlled trials (RCTs) assessing the effects of music-based interventions for pain and anxiety management during vaginal labour and caesarean delivery. Following the PRISMA guidelines, a systematic search of the literature was conducted using: PsychInfo (Ovid), PubMed, and Web of Science. Studies were included in the review if they were RCTs that assessed the effects of music on pain and anxiety during vaginal and caesarean delivery by human mothers. A narrative synthesis was conducted on 28 identified studies with a total of 2835 participants. Most, but not all, of the included studies assessing music-based interventions resulted in reduced anxiety and pain during vaginal and caesarean delivery. Music as part of a comprehensive treatment strategy, participant-selected music, music coupled with another therapy, and relaxing/instrumental music was specifically useful for reducing light to moderate pain and anxiety. Music-based interventions show promising effects in mitigating pain and anxiety in women during labour. However, the long-term effects of these interventions are unclear. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Music for Health Care and Well-Being)
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10 pages, 702 KiB  
Case Report
Long-Term Multi-Sensory Gamma Stimulation of Dementia Patients: A Case Series Report
by Amy Clements-Cortes and Lee Bartel
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2022, 19(23), 15553; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph192315553 - 23 Nov 2022
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 1749
Abstract
Dementia prevalence is increasing globally, and symptom management and treatment strategies require further investigation. Music-based interventions have demonstrated some efficacy with respect to quality of life and symptom reduction, though limited with respect to cognition. This study reports on three case studies where [...] Read more.
Dementia prevalence is increasing globally, and symptom management and treatment strategies require further investigation. Music-based interventions have demonstrated some efficacy with respect to quality of life and symptom reduction, though limited with respect to cognition. This study reports on three case studies where the use of gamma stimulation over one year contributed to maintenance of cognition and increases in mood for participants with Alzheimer’s disease or mild cognitive impairment. Auditory stimulation with isochronous sound at 40 Hz was delivered to participants via a commercially available vibroacoustic chair device five times per week for 30 min with assistance from caregivers. Further research is needed to assess the integration of this therapy in the overall care for persons with dementia. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Music for Health Care and Well-Being)
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