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New Research on Mental Health in Sport

A special issue of International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health (ISSN 1660-4601). This special issue belongs to the section "Exercise and Health-Related Quality of Life".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 15 November 2024 | Viewed by 3783

Special Issue Editor


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Guest Editor
Department of Applied Medicine and Rehabilitation, Indiana State University, Terre Haute, IN 47809, USA
Interests: mental health; injury prevention; athletes; patient-centered care; health and health care disparities

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

This Special Issue will be focused on mental health in sport. Specifically, we are seeking submissions that characterize the mental illness risk mitigation, prevalence of mental illness, improvements to mental wellness, and post-injury mental health among the athlete and physically active populations. Submissions are welcome from sports medicine and counseling professionals, including athletic training, sports medicine and orthopedic physicians, physical therapy and other rehabilitation scientists, mental health counselors, psychologists, psychiatrists, as well as any others focused on the mental health and wellness of athletes. The Special Issue will highlight the various mental wellness challenges faced by today’s athletes but also explore prevention and intervention mechanisms.

Potential topics include but are not limited to mental health and wellness prevalence, mental health education and professional development, mindfulness and psychological flexibility training, coping and resilience, neurodiversity and concomitant mental health concerns, sleep difficulties and sleep training, cognitive behavioral therapy, preparedness and performance, and pharmacological interventions with sport, exercise, and competition.

Dr. Lindsey Eberman
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2500 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • mental health
  • mental wellness
  • languishing
  • flourishing
  • behavioral health
  • counseling
  • depression
  • anxiety
  • trauma
  • well-being
  • mental exhaustion
  • psychology

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

14 pages, 322 KiB  
Article
Athletic Trainers’ Perceptions of Responsibilities and Use of Psychosocial Interventions for Patients Following an ACL Injury
by Joshua K. Matthews, Kayleigh A. De Koker and Zachary K. Winkelmann
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2023, 20(18), 6762; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph20186762 - 15 Sep 2023
Viewed by 1334
Abstract
Following an anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury, mental health challenges are often concomitant with the injury and rehabilitation process. Athletic trainers are essential components within the healthcare team who should be trained in recognizing, referring, and managing mental health issues. However, more research [...] Read more.
Following an anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury, mental health challenges are often concomitant with the injury and rehabilitation process. Athletic trainers are essential components within the healthcare team who should be trained in recognizing, referring, and managing mental health issues. However, more research is needed on the athletic trainer's responsibility regarding psychosocial interventions and their role within ACL patients. Our descriptive study included 153 collegiate athletic trainers who reported on previous training and responsibilities related to mental health. Of these participants, 98% reported caring for an ACL patient within the last year. The participants were further asked to explore what behavioral responses were observed within ACL injury patients, the specific psychosocial interventions deployed, the frequency of integration, and whether a referral to another provider was utilized. We identified that athletic trainers share a strong understanding of their perceived roles, with 99.3% of participants stating the obligatory feeling to support ACL patients experiencing mental health challenges and implementing personalized rehabilitation (74%) and attainable goals (70%) while also keeping the athlete involved in the team (72%). Our data suggest that athletic trainers recognize their role and continue to integrate psychosocial strategies throughout the ACL injury process. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue New Research on Mental Health in Sport)
15 pages, 972 KiB  
Article
Exploring Individual Mental Health Issues: A Qualitative Study among Fellowship-Trained Sports Medicine Physicians
by James Stavitz, Adam Eckart and Pragya Ghimire
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2023, 20(7), 5303; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph20075303 - 29 Mar 2023
Viewed by 1958
Abstract
The mental health of fellowship-trained sports medicine physicians (FTSMPs) around the United States is a subject that needs additional exploration. Currently, there is little research exploring how FTSMPs address their mental health on a routine basis. Using the theory of secondary trauma stress [...] Read more.
The mental health of fellowship-trained sports medicine physicians (FTSMPs) around the United States is a subject that needs additional exploration. Currently, there is little research exploring how FTSMPs address their mental health on a routine basis. Using the theory of secondary trauma stress to help navigate this study, the purpose of this expressive, all-purpose qualitative study is to improve the understanding of FTSMPs’ perceptions of their mental health and the kinds of strategies used to manage these issues. This is a general qualitative study. All interviews were conducted via video communication platforms such as Zoom. The final sample included 35 FTSMPs: 25 men and 10 women. Data collection used a semi-structured interview approach. Data analysis was carried out using NVivo 12 qualitative data analysis software. Four themes emerged: mental health matters affect individual daily lives of FTSMPs; FTSMPs correlate mental health struggles with stress and anxiety; FTSMPs experience barricades when seeking support for mental health issues; and FTSMPs have poor mental health support-seeking behaviors. Results highlight openings for hospitals and private practice institutions, including producing a maintainable work–life equilibrium for FTSMPs and offering these FTSMPs access to mental health services. These recommendations may diminish exhaustion amongst several FTSMPs, a product detrimental to patients, providers, and hospitals. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue New Research on Mental Health in Sport)
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Planned Papers

The below list represents only planned manuscripts. Some of these manuscripts have not been received by the Editorial Office yet. Papers submitted to MDPI journals are subject to peer-review.

Title: Sex Differences in Self-Reported Symptoms of Anxiety and Depression Among Individuals with Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction
Authors: Francesca Genoese; Katherine Collins; Michelle C. Walaszek; Elaine Reiche; Matthew S. Harkey; Christopher Kuenze; Shelby E. Baez
Affiliation: Department of Exercise and Sport Science, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC
Abstract: no

Title: Barriers and Attitudes Toward Seeking Mental Health Services Among Collegiate Marching Band Artists
Authors: Kenya Moore 1 Nancy Uriegas 1, Dawn Emerson 1, Zachary Winkelmann 1, Kysha Harriell 2 and Toni M. Torres-McGehee1
Affiliation: 1 Department of Exercise Science, School of Public, Health University of South Carolina Columbia, SC 29208, USA; kenyam@email.sc.edu (K.M.); nuriegas@email.sc.edu (N.U.); mintond@mailbox.sc.edu (D.E.), winkelz@mailbox.sc.edu, torresmc@mailbox.sc.edu 2 Department of Kinesiology and Sport Sciences, University of Miami, Coral Gables, FL 33146, USA; kharriell@miami.edu
Abstract: no

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