ijerph-logo

Journal Browser

Journal Browser

Prevention and Treatment of Obesity and Metabolic Syndrome

A special issue of International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health (ISSN 1660-4601). This special issue belongs to the section "Infectious Diseases, Chronic Diseases, and Disease Prevention".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 June 2024 | Viewed by 5323

Special Issue Editor


E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Physical Education, Health Sciences Centre, State University of Maringá, Maringá 87020-900, Brazil
Interests: obesity prevention and treatment; physical activity; fitness; health promotion; metabolic health

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Obesity has been recognized as one of the main challenges to public health around the world because of all of its impacts on health and wellbeing. Despite this, it is still under-recognized and under-treated, and, in many countries, it is not considered a non-communicable disease. These are some challenges to designing and delivering meaningful plans for the prevention, management, and long-term treatment of obesity. There are also the differences between intensive and prohibitively expensive interventions used in clinical trials which, to ensure lifestyle changes, need to be translated into practical affordable interventions that are deliverable in real-world healthcare systems. In particular, the population that receive care in community healthcare centers are under-served. These patients have high rates of obesity and obesity-associated conditions, particularly hypertension and cardiovascular disease, and have been under-represented in obesity trials. Another problem related to obesity is the stigma, even among health professionals, against people living with obesity. This tends to delay the search for healthcare and consequently may aggravate the condition. Considering all of the above, it is necessary that the scientific community present viable and scalable solutions to this massive challenge, and these solutions must be assessed in different scenarios in order to test their effectiveness in those conditions.

Dr. Nélson Nardo Júnior
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2500 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • obesity
  • treatment
  • efficacy
  • effectiveness
  • metabolic syndrome

Published Papers (3 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

15 pages, 1360 KiB  
Article
Interdisciplinary Therapy Improves the Mediators of Inflammation and Cardiovascular Risk in Adolescents with Obesity
by Deborah Cristina Landi Masquio, Raquel Munhoz da Silveira Campos, Bárbara Dal Molin Netto, Joana Pereira de Carvalho-Ferreira, Carlos Roberto Bueno, Jr., Stella Alouan, Gabriela Tronca Poletto, Aline de Piano Ganen, Sergio Tufik, Marco Túlio de Mello, Nelson Nardo, Jr. and Ana R. Dâmaso
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2023, 20(23), 7114; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph20237114 - 27 Nov 2023
Viewed by 1811
Abstract
Obesity is associated with inflammation and an increased risk of cardiovascular disease and premature mortality, as well as a range of other conditions. Obesity is a growing global problem, not only in adults, but also in children and adolescents. Therefore, the present study [...] Read more.
Obesity is associated with inflammation and an increased risk of cardiovascular disease and premature mortality, as well as a range of other conditions. Obesity is a growing global problem, not only in adults, but also in children and adolescents. Therefore, the present study aimed to assess the effects of a one-year interdisciplinary intervention on the cardiometabolic and inflammatory profiles of adolescents with obesity. Twenty-two adolescents completed the intervention, which included clinical, nutritional, psychological and physical exercise counselling. Body composition, and metabolic, inflammatory, and cardiovascular risk biomarkers were analyzed before and after one year of intervention. Visceral and subcutaneous fat were determined ultrasonographically. The homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) and the quantitative insulin sensitivity check index (QUICKI) equation were used to estimate insulin resistance and insulin sensitivity, respectively. A reduction in body mass, adiposity, glucose, and insulin and an improved lipid profile were observed after the therapy. Hyperleptinemia was reduced from 77.3% to 36.4%. Plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1), intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM-1), leptin, the leptin/adiponectin ratio, and the adiponectin/leptin ratio were also significantly improved. Metabolic changes were associated with a reduction in visceral fat and waist circumference, and adiponectin and the leptin/adiponectin ratio were associated with HOMA-IR. The interdisciplinary therapy promoted improvements in hyperleptinemia and metabolic, inflammatory, and cardiovascular biomarkers. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Prevention and Treatment of Obesity and Metabolic Syndrome)
Show Figures

Graphical abstract

18 pages, 719 KiB  
Article
Effects of 12 Weeks of Family and Individual Multi-Disciplinary Intervention in Overweight and Obese Adolescents under Cardiometabolic Risk Parameters: A Clinical Trial
by Déborah Cristina de Souza Marques, Lilian Rosana dos Santos Moraes, Marilene Ghiraldi de Souza Marques, Joed Jacinto Ryal, Isabella Caroline Santos, Marielle Priscila De Paula Silva Lalucci, Jorge Mota, Pablo Valdés-Badilla, Greice Westphal Nardo and Braulio Henrique Magnani Branco
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2023, 20(20), 6954; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph20206954 - 20 Oct 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1753
Abstract
Adolescence is a complex period of human development in which young people are susceptible to unhealthy behaviors, such as physical inactivity and an unbalanced diet. This study aimed to analyze the effects of 12 weeks of multi-disciplinary family and individual intervention on cardiometabolic [...] Read more.
Adolescence is a complex period of human development in which young people are susceptible to unhealthy behaviors, such as physical inactivity and an unbalanced diet. This study aimed to analyze the effects of 12 weeks of multi-disciplinary family and individual intervention on cardiometabolic risk parameters in overweight and obese adolescents and compare sub-groups, considering possible differences between sexes (males vs. females vs. intervention approach). Forty-three adolescents (13.73 ± 2.46 years old) of both sexes were divided into two groups: family group (FG) (n = 21; 14.24 ± 2.61 years old) and individual group (IG) (n = 22; 13.23 ± 2.27 years old). The following parameters were evaluated: anthropometry (body weight, height, waist circumference (WC), hip circumference (HC), abdominal circumference (AC), calculation of body mass index (BMI), and waist–hip ratio (WHR)), body composition (fat mass (FM), lean mass (LM), fat-free mass (FFM), skeletal muscle mass (SMM), body fat percentage (BF), and visceral fat), biochemical measures (fasting glucose, triglycerides (TG), total cholesterol (TC), low-density lipoproteins (LDL-c), and high-density lipoproteins (HDL-c)), and the measurement of systolic and diastolic blood pressure (SBP and DBP) before and after the interventions. The multi-disciplinary interventions occurred for 12 weeks (three days a week lasting 1 h and 30 min, in which 30 min were dedicated to theoretical interventions (nutrition: nutritional education and psychology: psychoeducation) and 1 h to physical exercises. A time effect was observed for LM, FFM, SMM, FM, and HDL-c, with higher values after intervention and a significant decrease for FM, BF, visceral fat, fasting glucose, TG, TC, LDL-c, and DBP (p < 0.05). However, no group, sub-group, or interaction effects were observed when comparing FG, IG, or sexes (p > 0.05). The responses of the present study show that both multi-disciplinary approaches (family and individual) promoted improvement in the body composition indicators, biochemical markers, and DBP of overweight and obese adolescents independently of the intervention group. Given this finding, health professionals, families, and adolescents could choose the type of intervention based on their preferences. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Prevention and Treatment of Obesity and Metabolic Syndrome)
Show Figures

Figure 1

14 pages, 1065 KiB  
Article
Exploring New Tools for Risk Classification among Adults with Several Degrees of Obesity
by Greice Westphal-Nardo, Jean-Philippe Chaput, César Faúndez-Casanova, Carlos Alexandre Molena Fernandes, Eliane Cristina de Andrade Gonçalves, Raquel Tomiazzi Utrila, Karine Oltramari, Felipe Merchan Ferraz Grizzo and Nelson Nardo-Junior
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2023, 20(13), 6263; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph20136263 - 30 Jun 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1235
Abstract
The epidemic of obesity worldwide has been recognized as a very important challenge. Within its complexity, the identification of higher-risk patients is essential, as it is unsustainable to offer access to treatment to all people with obesity. Several new approaches have recently been [...] Read more.
The epidemic of obesity worldwide has been recognized as a very important challenge. Within its complexity, the identification of higher-risk patients is essential, as it is unsustainable to offer access to treatment to all people with obesity. Several new approaches have recently been presented as important tools for risk stratification. In this research, we applied several of these tools in a cross-sectional study involving adults with obesity classes I, II, III, and super-obesity. The participants had their cardiometabolic risk profiles assessed. The study included adults with obesity aged 18 to 50 years (n = 404), who were evaluated using anthropometric, body composition, hemodynamic, physical fitness, and biochemical assessments. These variables were used to identify the prevalence of risk factors for cardiometabolic diseases according to the classes of obesity by gender and age group. The results showed high prevalence of risk factors, especially among the upper classes of obesity (BMI > 35 kg/m2) using single parameters as the waist circumference, with almost 90% above the cut-off point. For smaller numbers such as Glycated Hemoglobin, however, the prevalence was around 30%. Indexes such as the atherogenic index of plasma (AIP) had the highest prevalence, with 100% of the male participants identified as being at increased risk for cardiovascular disease. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Prevention and Treatment of Obesity and Metabolic Syndrome)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Back to TopTop