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One Health Care in Non-communicable Diseases

A special issue of International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health (ISSN 1660-4601). This special issue belongs to the section "Health Care Sciences & Services".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 January 2024) | Viewed by 10349

Special Issue Editors

Medical Pathology, Nutrition and Clinical Exercise Group (PaMNEC), Multidisciplinary Research Center of Egas Moniz (CiiEM), 2829-511 Caparica, Portugal
Interests: neurological diseases; Parkinson's disease; elderly and aging; clinical exercise; non-pharmacologic interventions
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals
Medical Pathology, Nutrition and Clinical Exercise Group (PaMNEC) of Multidisciplinary Research, Center of Egas Moniz (CiiEM), Escola Superior de Saúde Egas Moniz, 2829-511 Caparica, Portugal
Interests: nursing; personalized medicine; physical rehabilitation; neurorehabilitation; qualitative research; health promotion
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals
Egas Moniz School of Health and Science, Campus Universitário - Quinta da Granja, Monte da Caparica, 2829-511 Caparica, Portugal
Interests: health impact of foods and diets; public health; healthy diets; sustainable diets; risk-benefit assessment of foods
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues, 

One Health is a collaborative, multisectoral, and transdisciplinary approach that works at local, regional, national, and global levels to achieve optimal health outcomes by recognizing the interconnection between people, animals, plants, and their shared environment.

More than 70% of all human deaths are due to non-communicable diseases (NCDs) [1]. Increasingly environmental exposures from air pollution, second-hand smoke, heavy metals, pesticides, and endocrine-disrupting chemicals, have been linked to a range of NCDs, including many cancers, cardiopulmonary diseases, neurological diseases and other pathologies. The fields of chronic disease, mental health, injury, occupational health, and non-communicable diseases can benefit from a One Health approach involving collaboration across disciplines and sectors. Employing One Health frameworks can provide innovative solutions to prevent and treat NCDs across the animal kingdom. An increased awareness among human health professionals and stakeholders of the shared vulnerability across species of environmentally linked NCDs should ignite interest and ideally mobilize resources for NCD surveillance across species [2]. These efforts could not only improve the health of humans, but of all species sharing exposures in increasingly hazardous environments [3].

This Special Issue of the International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health (IJERPH) focuses on the current state of knowledge on how society in general, and health professionals in particular, can contribute to One Health care in non-communicable diseases.

References

1. World Health Organization. Noncommunicable Diseases (NCD). Available online: https://www.who.int/data/gho/data/themes/topics/topic-details/GHO/ncd-mortality (accessed on 14 July 2022).

2. Bordier, M., Binot, A., Pauchard, Q., Nguyen, D.T., Trung, T.N., Fortané, N., Goutard, F.L. Antibiotic resistance in Vietnam: moving towards a One Health surveillance system. BMC Public Health 2018, 18, 1–14. https://bmcpublichealth.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s12889-018-6022-4.

3. Natterson-Horowitz, B., Boddy, A.M., Zimmerman, D. Female Health Across the Tree of Life: Insights at the Intersection of Women's Health, One Health and Planetary Health. PNAS nexus 2022, 1, pgac044. https://academic.oup.com/pnasnexus/article/1/2/pgac044/6568570?login=false (accessed on 14 July 2022).

Dr. Catarina Godinho
Dr. Júlio Belo Fernandes
Dr. Ricardo Assunção
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2500 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • One Health
  • non-communicable diseases
  • environmental exposures
  • cancer
  • cardiopulmonary diseases
  • mental health and neurological disorders
  • health determinants
  • veterinary medicine
  • public health
  • animal health

Published Papers (7 papers)

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Research

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14 pages, 4108 KiB  
Article
Analysing the Influence of WHO Initiatives on the Scientific Discourse of Noncommunicable Diseases through a Bibliometric Approach
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2023, 20(18), 6714; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph20186714 - 06 Sep 2023
Viewed by 1106
Abstract
Noncommunicable diseases (NCDs) present a major public health challenge, prompting their inclusion in the United Nations’ 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development. In response, the World Health Organization (WHO) has implemented various initiatives, including a comprehensive monitoring framework with global targets and indicators. However, [...] Read more.
Noncommunicable diseases (NCDs) present a major public health challenge, prompting their inclusion in the United Nations’ 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development. In response, the World Health Organization (WHO) has implemented various initiatives, including a comprehensive monitoring framework with global targets and indicators. However, the extent to which these initiatives have shaped the scientific discourse remains unclear. This article addresses this knowledge gap through a two-fold approach. Firstly, a bibliometric analysis of 14,187 studies spanning over 60 years is conducted, identifying key contributors and trends. Secondly, the content analysis compares these trends to the goals established by the WHO. The findings indicate that the WHO initiatives have accelerated scientific research, and elevated global targets and indicators as central themes in scholarly discussions, since 2011. This study takes an innovative approach that contributes to the advancement of knowledge in this field, by providing valuable insights into the impact of WHO initiatives on the scientific debate surrounding NCDs, and offering guidance for policymakers, researchers, and stakeholders engaged in combating these diseases. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue One Health Care in Non-communicable Diseases)
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24 pages, 11465 KiB  
Article
Perspectives on the Person-Centered Practice of Healthcare Professionals at an Inpatient Hospital Department: A Descriptive Study
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2023, 20(9), 5635; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph20095635 - 25 Apr 2023
Viewed by 1136
Abstract
The characteristics of health professionals and their understanding of person-centeredness may have important implications for the development of person-centered practice in specific care settings. In this study, we characterized the perceptions of the person-centered practice of a multidisciplinary team of health professionals working [...] Read more.
The characteristics of health professionals and their understanding of person-centeredness may have important implications for the development of person-centered practice in specific care settings. In this study, we characterized the perceptions of the person-centered practice of a multidisciplinary team of health professionals working in the internal medicine inpatient unit of a Portuguese hospital. Data were collected using a brief sociodemographic and professional questionnaire and the person-centered practice inventory-staff (PCPI-S), and the effect of different sociodemographic and professional variables on each PCPI-S domain was determined using an analysis of variance (ANOVA). The results showed that a person-centered practice was positively perceived in the major constructs of prerequisites (M = 4.12; SD = 0.36), the practice environment (M = 3.50; SD = 0.48), and person-centered process (M = 4.08; SD = 0.62) domains. The highest scored construct was developed interpersonal skills (M = 4.35; SD = 0.47), and the lowest was supportive organization systems (M = 3.08; SD = 0.80). Gender was found to influence the perceptions of knowing self (F(2,75) = 3.67, p = 0.03, partial η2 = 0.089) and the physical environment (F(2,75) = 3.63, p = 0.03, partial η2 = 0.088), as was profession on shared decision-making systems (F(2,75) = 5.38, p < 0.01, partial η2 = 0.125) and commitment to the job (F(2,75) = 5.27, p < 0.01, partial η2 = 0.123), and the educational level on being professionally competent (F(1,75) = 4.99, p = 0.03, partial η2 = 0.062) and having commitment to the job (F(2,75) = 4.49, p = 0.04, partial η2 = 0.056). In addition, the PCPI-S proved to be a reliable instrument for characterizing healthcare professionals’ perceptions of the person-centeredness of care in this context. Identifying personal and professional variables that influence these perceptions could provide a starting point for defining strategies to move practice toward person-centeredness and for monitoring changes in healthcare practice. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue One Health Care in Non-communicable Diseases)
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10 pages, 336 KiB  
Article
Analysis of Portuguese Physiotherapists’ Self-Knowledge on Temporomandibular Disorders
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2023, 20(2), 1294; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph20021294 - 11 Jan 2023
Viewed by 1064
Abstract
Background: Physiotherapy is one of the most referenced and effective conservative strategies for treating patients with temporomandibular disorders (TMD). This study aimed to characterize and analyze the self-knowledge of TMD of Portuguese physiotherapists. Methods: an online questionnaire was carried out, and the data [...] Read more.
Background: Physiotherapy is one of the most referenced and effective conservative strategies for treating patients with temporomandibular disorders (TMD). This study aimed to characterize and analyze the self-knowledge of TMD of Portuguese physiotherapists. Methods: an online questionnaire was carried out, and the data collected were descriptively analyzed. Results: A total of 338 physiotherapists participated, of which only 142 treated patients with TMD. Seventy-six percent of the physiotherapists reported that they had not received training in the TMD area during the physiotherapy degree course. Only 11% of the physiotherapists reported that treating patients with TMD adequately identified all symptoms of TMD. Conclusions: the present study showed that it is necessary to integrate TMD-related content into the basic training of physiotherapists and promote an increase in evidence-based training. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue One Health Care in Non-communicable Diseases)

Review

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15 pages, 639 KiB  
Review
Nursing Interventions to Empower Family Caregivers to Manage the Risk of Falling in Older Adults: A Scoping Review
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2024, 21(3), 246; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph21030246 - 21 Feb 2024
Viewed by 328
Abstract
Falls pose a significant risk to older adults, resulting in injuries and declining quality of life. The psychological impact, particularly the fear of falling, impairs their well-being. This pervasive fear affects daily activities, leading to self-imposed limitations and reduced engagement. This review aimed [...] Read more.
Falls pose a significant risk to older adults, resulting in injuries and declining quality of life. The psychological impact, particularly the fear of falling, impairs their well-being. This pervasive fear affects daily activities, leading to self-imposed limitations and reduced engagement. This review aimed to identify nursing interventions to empower family caregivers to manage the risk of falling in older adults. A scoping review was developed following the JBI framework. We searched the CINAHL, MEDLINE, Nursing & Allied Health Collection, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, MedicLatina, and Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews. The findings of this review revealed that out of 460 initially identified records, nine articles met the eligibility criteria and were retained for further in-depth analysis. These articles provided insights into nine distinct categories of nurse interventions: Therapeutic Relationships, Family Involvement, Personalized Care, Health Education, Multifactorial Falls Risk Assessment, Home Modifications, Referral, Transition Between Healthcare Services, and Health Care Consultants. The findings of this review have significant implications for clinical practice, particularly in emphasizing the crucial role of nurses in empowering family caregivers and older adults to manage the risk of falling at home. Healthcare professionals, policymakers, and researchers can benefit from this informative resource to develop strategies and guidelines. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue One Health Care in Non-communicable Diseases)
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15 pages, 543 KiB  
Review
Current Trends in Balance Rehabilitation for Stroke Survivors: A Scoping Review of Experimental Studies
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2023, 20(19), 6829; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph20196829 - 26 Sep 2023
Viewed by 2120
Abstract
Balance impairment is a common consequence of a stroke, which can significantly hinder individuals’ participation in daily activities, social interactions, and leisure pursuits and their ability to return to work. Rehabilitation is vital for minimizing post-stroke sequelae and facilitating the recovery of patients. [...] Read more.
Balance impairment is a common consequence of a stroke, which can significantly hinder individuals’ participation in daily activities, social interactions, and leisure pursuits and their ability to return to work. Rehabilitation is vital for minimizing post-stroke sequelae and facilitating the recovery of patients. This review aims to identify current trends in balance rehabilitation of stroke survivors. This Scoping review followed Arksey and O’Malley’s methodological framework. The literature search was conducted in electronic databases, including CINAHL Complete, MEDLINE Complete, and Nursing & Allied Health Collection. The search was performed in March 2023, and the inclusion criteria were articles published in English or Portuguese between 2013 and 2023. A total of 446 articles were identified. After selecting and analyzing the reports, fourteen publications were included in this review. Seven distinct categories of balance rehabilitation interventions were identified, covering various approaches. These categories included conventional rehabilitation exercises, gym-based interventions, vibration therapy, rhythmic auditory stimulation training, boxing therapy, dual-task training, and technology-based rehabilitation interventions. Each of these methods presents unique benefits and can significantly impact the recovery of balance in stroke survivors, enhancing their overall well-being and functional capacity. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue One Health Care in Non-communicable Diseases)
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18 pages, 844 KiB  
Review
Microbial Contamination of Bedding Material: One Health in Poultry Production
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2022, 19(24), 16508; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph192416508 - 08 Dec 2022
Cited by 5 | Viewed by 1672
Abstract
In poultry farms, the mixture of bedding material, chicken excrement, and feathers seems to play an important role in pathogen development which may contribute to a potential risk of zoonosis, spreading the disease through the food chain. The purpose of this study was [...] Read more.
In poultry farms, the mixture of bedding material, chicken excrement, and feathers seems to play an important role in pathogen development which may contribute to a potential risk of zoonosis, spreading the disease through the food chain. The purpose of this study was to analyze microbial contamination in bedding material and other matrices as well as potential antimicrobial resistances in chicken production facilities, and also to identify the sampling techniques and assays used. This study evidences the available data published, following the PRISMA methodology. Among the environmental samples, surface swabs were frequently used as a passive sampling technique. Morphological identification was performed in all studies. From all the matrices, the bedding material was the most contaminated. Most studies focused on bacterial contamination, with Salmonella sp. and Campylobacter sp. being commonly reported and three studies evidenced fungal contamination, being Penicillium sp.- and Aspergillus sp.-dominant. Mycotoxin assessment was only performed in one study, being identified in all bedding samples. The screening for bacteria resistance evidenced bacteria multidrug resistance; however, fungal susceptibility to azoles was not assessed in any of the analyzed studies. Briefly, this review evidences the microbial contamination in poultry facilities, emphasizing animals’ bedding as a potential source of contamination. Additionally, this study contributes to a sampling and analysis protocol proposal to assess the microbial contamination in this setting. Additionally, the knowledge gaps identified highlight the need of further research regarding microbial contamination and toxicological potential on animals’ bedding in order to mitigate the exposure in poultry pavilions. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue One Health Care in Non-communicable Diseases)
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Other

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8 pages, 328 KiB  
Study Protocol
Person-Centered Practice in Hospitalized Older Adults with Chronic Illness: Clinical Study Protocol
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2022, 19(17), 11145; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph191711145 - 05 Sep 2022
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 1513
Abstract
The aging trend in the population, the high rate of hospitalization, the affliction by multiple chronic illnesses, and the increased vulnerability of older people when hospitalized undoubtedly require a person-centered approach to healthcare—an approach that values a person’s participation in the healthcare relationship, [...] Read more.
The aging trend in the population, the high rate of hospitalization, the affliction by multiple chronic illnesses, and the increased vulnerability of older people when hospitalized undoubtedly require a person-centered approach to healthcare—an approach that values a person’s participation in the healthcare relationship, supports shared decision making and mutual understanding, and respects a person’s values, preferences, and beliefs. However, despite widespread recognition that the adoption of such a clinical practice paradigm is paramount, its implementation and development are still challenging for various health systems and professionals worldwide. The implementation strategy for such a healthcare paradigm must be based on each country’s health system organization and practice contexts, as well as the professionals involved. The present work aims to provide guidelines for the understanding of the state of development of person-centered practice in the daily care of hospitalized older adults with chronic illnesses within the internal medicine department of a secondary hospital in an urban area of Portugal. We focus on the characterization of (i) the perceptions of a multidisciplinary team working at an inpatient hospital department of person-centered practice, (ii) the perceptions of hospitalized older adults with chronic illnesses about person-centered practice, (iii) the work culture of an inpatient hospital department with a high prevalence of older adults with chronic illnesses, (iv) the Person-Centred Practice Framework at the organizational and structural levels of the healthcare system, and (v) the elements that influence the implementation of person-centered practice at the individual, organizational, and structural levels in this specific hospital context. To this end, a mixed-methods analysis with a convergent design was planned to use questionnaire instruments to collect data in parallel and independently from distinct samples of health professionals and older inpatient adults within this department. Furthermore, health policies and strategic plans will be analyzed to identify and evaluate references and guidelines for the practice of person-centered care. Studying the dimensions of clinical practice in this specific healthcare context following the Person-Centred Practice Framework can allow us to understand the extent of its development in terms of prerequisites, care environment, care processes, and the macro-context of the healthcare system. Therefore, it is possible to identify and characterize the dimensions achieved and those that need to be improved and, thus, establish a starting point for the definition of new strategies to advance practice towards person-centeredness and monitor changes in healthcare practice. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue One Health Care in Non-communicable Diseases)
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