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Indoor Air Quality and Health in Vehicles

A special issue of International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health (ISSN 1660-4601). This special issue belongs to the section "Air".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 September 2023) | Viewed by 1976

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
LEPABE—Laboratório de Engenharia de Processos, Ambiente, Biotecnologia e Energia, Laboratory for Process Engineering, Environment, Biotechnology and Energy, Faculty of Engineering, University of Porto, 4200-465 Porto, Portugal
Interests: indoor air quality; exposure modelling; occupational exposure; health impacts; mitigation strategies; low-cost sensing technologies; applied statistics and data science
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
LEPABE—Laboratório de Engenharia de Processos, Ambiente, Biotecnologia e Energia, Laboratory for Process Engineering, Environment, Biotechnology and Energy, Faculty of Engineering, University of Porto, 4200-465 Porto, Portugal
Interests: impact of air quality on public health; assessment and management of air quality; atmospheric emissions from shipping; indoor air quality and its impact on childhood asthma – epidemiology; low-cost sensors for air quality measurements; air quality modelling
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

grade E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Global Center for Clean Air Research (GCARE), School of Sustainability, Civil and Environmental Engineering, Faculty of Engineering and Physical Sciences, University of Surrey, Surrey GU2 7XH, UK
Interests: low-cost sensing; air pollution modelling; pollution mitigation; atmospheric science
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Air pollution is a public health emergency, both indoors and outdoors, although indoor environments are less studied. Nevertheless, people spend most of their time in indoor environments, which includes built environments (e.g., households, offices and schools), but also means of transport, which are usually neglected in air pollution and health studies. Indoor air quality and health studies on vehicles are still scarce and scattered, although both drivers and passengers may be exposed to high levels of air pollution during travel time, either from surrounding fixed or mobile sources or from internal and external vehicle emissions. Several pollutants are expected to highly contribute to human exposure inside vehicles, namely particulate matter, especially ultrafine particles, volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and carbon dioxide (CO2). Drivers’ and passengers’ exposures are expected to cause health impacts that can vary from affecting driver performance to chronic health effects.

Thus, this Special Issue intends to go beyond the state-of-the-art by gathering new and/or review studies on air quality characterization inside vehicles, and/or studies that evaluate its associated health impacts. Studies on indoor air in any vehicle (car, bus, train, metro, tram, plane or boat) are welcome. Health impact studies that consider any health outcome are also welcome.

Dr. Pedro Branco
Dr. Sofia Sousa
Prof. Dr. Prashant Kumar
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2500 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • indoor air
  • air pollution
  • vehicle
  • cabin
  • public transport
  • exposure
  • health impact
  • driver
  • passenger

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

14 pages, 2143 KiB  
Article
Particle Number Concentration Measurements on Public Transport in Bangkok, Thailand
by James C. Matthews, Chalida Chompoobut, Panida Navasumrit, M. Anwar H. Khan, Matthew D. Wright, Mathuros Ruchirawat and Dudley E. Shallcross
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2023, 20(7), 5316; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph20075316 - 29 Mar 2023
Viewed by 1542
Abstract
Traffic is a major source of particulate pollution in large cities, and particulate matter (PM) level in Bangkok often exceeds the World Health Organisation limits. While PM2.5 and PM10 are both measured in Bangkok regularly, the sub-micron range of PM, of [...] Read more.
Traffic is a major source of particulate pollution in large cities, and particulate matter (PM) level in Bangkok often exceeds the World Health Organisation limits. While PM2.5 and PM10 are both measured in Bangkok regularly, the sub-micron range of PM, of specific interest in regard to possible adverse health effects, is very limited. In the study, particle number concentration (PNC) was measured on public transport in Bangkok. A travel route through Bangkok using the state railway, the mass rapid transport underground system, the Bangkok Mass Transit System (BTS) Skytrain and public buses on the road network, with walking routes between, was taken whilst measuring particle levels with a hand-held concentration particle counter. The route was repeated 19 times covering different seasons during either morning or evening rush hours. The highest particle concentrations were found on the state railway, followed by the bus, the BTS Skytrain and the MRT underground with measured peaks of 350,000, 330,000, 33,000 and 9000 cm−3, respectively, though particle numbers over 100,000 cm−3 may be an underestimation due to undercounting in the instrument. Inside each form of public transport, particle numbers would peak when stopping to collect passengers (doors opening) and decay with a half-life between 2 and 3 min. There was a weak correlation between particle concentration on bus, train and BTS and Skytrain with carbon monoxide concentration, as measured at a fixed location in the city. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Indoor Air Quality and Health in Vehicles)
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