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Sports Injury Prevention, Rehabilitation, and Performance Optimization

A special issue of International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health (ISSN 1660-4601). This special issue belongs to the section "Exercise and Health-Related Quality of Life".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 July 2024 | Viewed by 5304

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
School of Health Professions, University of Southern Mississippi, Hattiesburg, MS 39401, USA
Interests: concussion; sport safety; sport culture; mixed methods research; qualitative research

E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
1. Datalys Center for Sports Injury Research and Prevention, 401 W Michigan St. #500, Indianapolis, IN 46202, USA
2. Department of Exercise and Sport Science, University of North Carolina, Fetzer Hall, 210 South Rd., Chapel Hill, NC 27514, USA
Interests: injury prevention; sports injuries; injury epidemiology; injury surveillance; physical activity epidemiology

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Injuries are an inherent risk of participation in sports that have the ability to impact physical health, mental health, social health, and sport performance. Until recently, the connection between the public health phenomenon and sports injury research was lacking. Therefore, understanding holistic healthcare as it relates to athletes, in particular, is vital to improving the health and wellness of athletes during their lifespan. This Special Issue is intended to lay a foundation for understanding the connection between public health concepts and sports injury research to optimize athlete health and performance. This Special Issue is aimed at providing selected contributions on sports injury epidemiology, public health theory applications in sports injury research, and the preparation of healthcare professionals to navigate issues of sports injury prevention and rehabilitation.

Potential topics include, but are not limited to:

  • sports injury epidemiology
  • public health theory applications in sport injury prevention
  • public health theory applications in sport injury rehabilitation
  • biopsychosocial impact of sports injury
  • preparation of healthcare professionals in sports
  • optimizing performance through injury prevention
  • optimizing performance through injury rehabilitation

Dr. Melissa Kossman
Dr. Avinash Chandran
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2500 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • injury risk
  • rehabilitation
  • prevention
  • public health
  • athletic training
  • sports medicine
  • biopsychosocial
  • sport safety
  • epidemiology
  • healthcare education

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

13 pages, 1944 KiB  
Article
Comparison of Urban versus Industry Normative Values of Immediate Post-Concussion Assessment and Cognitive Testing (ImPACT™)
by Tamerah N. Hunt and Megan Byrd
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2024, 21(3), 247; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph21030247 - 21 Feb 2024
Viewed by 1221
Abstract
Concussion baseline testing has been advocated for the assessment of pre-morbid function. When individual baseline scores are unavailable, utilizing normative values is recommended. However, the validity of generalizing normative data across multiple socioeconomic environments is unknown. Objective: mimic the normative data creation of [...] Read more.
Concussion baseline testing has been advocated for the assessment of pre-morbid function. When individual baseline scores are unavailable, utilizing normative values is recommended. However, the validity of generalizing normative data across multiple socioeconomic environments is unknown. Objective: mimic the normative data creation of ImPACT™ to examine the effect of socioeconomic status (SES) on ImPACT™ composite scores. Methods: A retrospective cross-sectional design analyzed completed computerized neuropsychological test data (ImPACT™) obtained to establish the baseline scores of cognitive function from males aged 13–15 years (n = 300) and 16–18 years (n = 331) from an urban high school system. Comparisons between baseline scores and normative ImPACT™ values were calculated utilizing t-tests with ImPACT™ composite scores serving as dependent variables. Results: significant differences between age-dependent urban composite scores and ImPACT™ normative values for 13–15- and 16–18-year-olds were found for Composite Verbal Memory, Composite Visual Memory, Composite Motor and Composite Reaction Time (p < 0.01). Conclusions: Significant differences exist between urban high school athletes and ImPACT™-provided age-dependent normative scores, with urban participants performing below age-dependent normative values. These findings support establishing SES appropriate normative values when baseline test scores are not available for direct comparison in order to provide better evaluation and post-concussion management across diverse populations. Full article
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11 pages, 1141 KiB  
Article
Efficacy of Guardian Cap Soft-Shell Padding on Head Impact Kinematics in American Football: Pilot Findings
by Aaron M. Sinnott, Madison C. Chandler, Charles Van Dyke, David L. Mincberg, Hari Pinapaka, Bradley J. Lauck and Jason P. Mihalik
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2023, 20(21), 6991; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph20216991 - 28 Oct 2023
Viewed by 2097
Abstract
Sport-related concussion prevention strategies in collision sports are a primary interest for sporting organizations and policy makers. After-market soft-shell padding purports to augment the protective capabilities of standard football helmets and to reduce head impact severity. We compared head impact kinematics [peak linear [...] Read more.
Sport-related concussion prevention strategies in collision sports are a primary interest for sporting organizations and policy makers. After-market soft-shell padding purports to augment the protective capabilities of standard football helmets and to reduce head impact severity. We compared head impact kinematics [peak linear acceleration (PLA) and peak rotational acceleration (PRA)] in athletes wearing Guardian Cap soft-shell padding to teammates without soft-shell padding. Ten Division I college football players were enrolled [soft-shell padding (SHELL) included four defensive linemen and one tight end; non-soft-shell (CONTROL) included two offensive linemen, two defensive linemen, and one tight end]. Participants wore helmets equipped with the Head Impact Telemetry System to quantify PLA (g) and PRA (rad/s2) during 14 practices. Two-way ANOVAs were conducted to compare log-transformed PLA and PRA between groups across helmet location and gameplay characteristics. In total, 968 video-confirmed head impacts between SHELL (n = 421) and CONTROL (n = 547) were analyzed. We observed a Group x Stance interaction for PRA (F1,963 = 7.21; p = 0.007) indicating greater PRA by SHELL during 2-point stance and lower PRA during 3- or 4-point stances compared to CONTROL. There were no between-group main effects. Protective soft-shell padding did not reduce head impact kinematic outcomes among college football athletes. Full article
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8 pages, 621 KiB  
Article
Effects of Footwear Selection on Plantar Pressure and Neuromuscular Characteristics during Jump Rope Training
by Hai-Bin Yu, Wei-Hsun Tai, Ben-Xiang He, Jing Li, Rui Zhang and Wei-Ya Hao
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2023, 20(3), 1731; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph20031731 - 18 Jan 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1517
Abstract
This study examined what footwear type influenced plantar pressure and lower extremity muscle activations in jump rope training. Ten healthy physical-education graduate students participated in this study. The biomechanical parameters during the jump rope training were collected by an AMTI force platform, a [...] Read more.
This study examined what footwear type influenced plantar pressure and lower extremity muscle activations in jump rope training. Ten healthy physical-education graduate students participated in this study. The biomechanical parameters during the jump rope training were collected by an AMTI force platform, a Novel Pedar-X insole and a wireless electromyography (EMG) system. The results of the force platform indicate that vertical ground reaction force (vGRF) and contact time were much higher in the one-leg landing (both p = 0.001). The GRF, GRF (BW) and Lat MF pressure were significantly greater in the one-leg landing (p = 0.018, 0.013 and 0.027); the pressure of the Lat MF and H area were significantly greater in the volleyball shoe (p = 0.025, 0.031); the pressure of the Mid FF and Lat FF area were significantly greater in the jumping shoe (p = 0.005, 0.042). No significant difference in EMG was found between footwear and landing conditions. In summary, the running shoe and jumping shoe might be a better choice for people who exercise. However, the running shoe is recommended for people when both jumping and running are required. Full article
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