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Technologies for Monitoring and Rehabilitation of Motor Disabilities

A special issue of International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health (ISSN 1660-4601).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 July 2024 | Viewed by 1734

Special Issue Editors

Institute of Electronics, Computer and Telecommunication Engineering, National Research Council, 10129 Turin, Italy
Interests: vision systems; motion capture and analysis; technologies for health monitoring; motor rehabilitation; machine learning; artificial intelligence; parkinson's disease; movement disorders
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals
Department of Electronics, Information and Bioengineering (DEIB), Politecnico di Milano, Piazza Leonardo da Vinci 32, 20133 Milano, Italy
Interests: bioengineering; movement analysis; biomechanics; rehabilitation; healthcare
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Motor disabilities are a major consequence of acute events, neurodegenerative processes, accidents, and injuries, severely impacting people's safety, independence, and quality of life. Dysfunctions in gait, postural stability and balance, upper limbs, and hand dexterity are among the most evident and disabling motor impairments. In addition, motor disabilities are strictly related to speech, swallowing, or facial expression disorders. Deficits in planning, control, and motor coordination impair the simplest daily activities, negatively affecting the psychological and emotional domains (frustration, depression, and anxiety are common consequences), thus complicating an already compromised clinical picture. Rehabilitation treatments aim to restore and optimize impaired functions through tailored physical activities and physiotherapy programs in order to regain autonomy and improve quality of life. However, traditional rehabilitation programs generally last only a few weeks and are accessible in health facilities to only a few patients at a time. Thanks to recent developments, technologies are already gaining more space in supporting the clinical management of patients. However, technologies may also play a crucial role in rehabilitation by integrating traditional protocols with new tools and methodological approaches that ensure continuity of treatment, home usability, and accessibility to more patients. Another advantage of technological solutions is the possibility to monitor performance quantitatively, continuously, and objectively, thus allowing improvements and worsening to be measured and interventional strategies (pharmacological and rehabilitative) to be customized based on the patient's current condition.

This Special Issue aims to collect recent studies and applications focused on the use of technological solutions and methodological approaches for rehabilitation and monitoring of motor disabilities and related effects. We welcome authors submitting manuscripts (original papers, reviews, and others) that focus on, but are not limited to, the following topics:

  • Sensors for rehabilitation and monitoring of motor disabilities (such as wearable sensors, optical sensors, video analysis, electromyography, smart textiles, and sensorized fabrics);
  • Innovative approaches for rehabilitation (such as virtual reality, augmented reality, exergaming, serious games, and gamification);
  • Artificial intelligence, machine, and deep learning to support clinical decision making;
  • Usability issues related to technological approaches for rehabilitation.

You may choose our Joint Special Issue in Bioengineering.

Dr. Claudia Ferraris
Prof. Dr. Veronica Cimolin
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2500 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • motor disabilities
  • technologies for health monitoring
  • motor rehabilitation
  • movement disorders
  • movement analysis

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

15 pages, 2021 KiB  
Article
Clinical Features to Predict the Use of a sEMG Wearable Device (REMO®) for Hand Motor Training of Stroke Patients: A Cross-Sectional Cohort Study
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2023, 20(6), 5082; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph20065082 - 14 Mar 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1367
Abstract
After stroke, upper limb motor impairment is one of the most common consequences that compromises the level of the autonomy of patients. In a neurorehabilitation setting, the implementation of wearable sensors provides new possibilities for enhancing hand motor recovery. In our study, we [...] Read more.
After stroke, upper limb motor impairment is one of the most common consequences that compromises the level of the autonomy of patients. In a neurorehabilitation setting, the implementation of wearable sensors provides new possibilities for enhancing hand motor recovery. In our study, we tested an innovative wearable (REMO®) that detected the residual surface-electromyography of forearm muscles to control a rehabilitative PC interface. The aim of this study was to define the clinical features of stroke survivors able to perform ten, five, or no hand movements for rehabilitation training. 117 stroke patients were tested: 65% of patients were able to control ten movements, 19% of patients could control nine to one movement, and 16% could control no movements. Results indicated that mild upper limb motor impairment (Fugl-Meyer Upper Extremity ≥ 18 points) predicted the control of ten movements and no flexor carpi muscle spasticity predicted the control of five movements. Finally, severe impairment of upper limb motor function (Fugl-Meyer Upper Extremity > 10 points) combined with no pain and no restrictions of upper limb joints predicted the control of at least one movement. In conclusion, the residual motor function, pain and joints restriction, and spasticity at the upper limb are the most important clinical features to use for a wearable REMO® for hand rehabilitation training. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Technologies for Monitoring and Rehabilitation of Motor Disabilities)
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