Oral Hygiene and Oral Health: Now More Connected Than Ever

A special issue of Hygiene (ISSN 2673-947X). This special issue belongs to the section "Oral and Dental Hygiene".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (29 February 2024) | Viewed by 6155

Special Issue Editors

Department of Medical, Oral and Biotechnological Sciences, University G. d’Annunzio, 66100 Chieti, Italy
Interests: MRONJ; oral surgery; maxillofacial surgery; reconstructive surgery; periodontitis; oral microbiome; diabetes and oral health; preventive and community dentistry; dental hygiene
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals
Department of Medical, Oral and Biotechnological Sciences, University G. d’Annunzio, 66100 Chieti, Italy
Interests: MRONJ; oral surgery; oral microbiome; periodontitis; diabetes; dental hygiene; oral pathology; microbiology

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

During the pandemic, oral health has become a worldwide concern reaching systemic status.

Now, more than ever, professionals from several different medical fields are cooperating in order to provide prompt answers to increasing doubts about global wellness.

This Special Issue endeavors to collect manuscripts based on dental experience, systematic and narrative reviews of established techniques, surveys but also original articles and case reports that can support a different point of view about oral medicine, dental hygiene, systemic health and upcoming relations with COVID-19. The aim of this Special Issue is to provide a study of the state-of-the-art of the problem and a starting point for future research. In light of this, articles addressing these topics are invited to this Special Issue.

Prof. Dr. Marco Dolci
Guest Editor

Dr. Silvia D’Agostino
Assistant Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Hygiene is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • dental hygiene
  • oral hygiene
  • oral health
  • systemic health
  • COVID-19 oral implications

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

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9 pages, 243 KiB  
Article
Cross Sectional Observational Study of Current E-Cigarette Use and Oral Health Needs among Adolescents, Population Assessment of Tobacco and Health Study, Wave 5
Hygiene 2023, 3(4), 374-382; https://doi.org/10.3390/hygiene3040027 - 12 Oct 2023
Viewed by 1292
Abstract
Adolescents are vulnerable to marketing and normalization of electronic nicotine delivery systems (ENDS) and electronic non-nicotine delivery systems (ENNDS). ENDS/ENNDS have lung and neurological impacts and a potential for oral health consequences. The aim of this study is to compare adolescents who use [...] Read more.
Adolescents are vulnerable to marketing and normalization of electronic nicotine delivery systems (ENDS) and electronic non-nicotine delivery systems (ENNDS). ENDS/ENNDS have lung and neurological impacts and a potential for oral health consequences. The aim of this study is to compare adolescents who use ENDS/ENNDS with adolescents who do not use ENDS/ENNDS in oral healthcare needs. A cross-sectional design was used with U.S. Population Assessment of Tobacco and Health wave 5 (PATH5; 2018–2019) data, (n = 12,098 adolescents, ages 12–18 years). The Wave 5 response, weighted to be nationally representative was 83.5%. This study included 9538 adolescent/parent dyads. The outcome variable was parent/guardian report of their child’s oral health need(s). The independent variable was self-reported current use/non-use of ENDS/ENNDS. Chi square and logistic regression analyses for oral health need were conducted. The Adjusted Odds Ratio for oral health needs comparing ENDS/ENNDS use vs. no use was 1.26 (95% CI: 1.01, 1.58; p = 0.0451) controlling for sex/gender, age, race, highest education in the household, physical activity of 60 min daily, self-perceived health, and language spoken at home. ENDS/ENNDS use continues to be a public health concern for U.S. youth. In this study, adolescents who used ENDS/ENNDS were more likely to have oral healthcare need than adolescents who did not use ENDS/ENNDS. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Oral Hygiene and Oral Health: Now More Connected Than Ever)

Review

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9 pages, 547 KiB  
Review
Diabetes and Non-Surgical Periodontal Therapy: What Can We Hope for?
Hygiene 2022, 2(2), 85-93; https://doi.org/10.3390/hygiene2020007 - 30 May 2022
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 3326
Abstract
Diabetes and periodontal disease share the same inflammatory pattern. Both these pathologies, if left untreated, lead to a cytokine storm that carries pro-inflammatory factors throughout the body. Periodontitis has recently been assumed to be the sixth complication of diabetes and the latest studies [...] Read more.
Diabetes and periodontal disease share the same inflammatory pattern. Both these pathologies, if left untreated, lead to a cytokine storm that carries pro-inflammatory factors throughout the body. Periodontitis has recently been assumed to be the sixth complication of diabetes and the latest studies suggest a biunivocal connection between these two conditions. Most recent evidence-based studies propose that having a controlled periodontal situation with proper and timely therapy could improve glycemic management in diabetic patients. In order to provide the newest findings on this topic, a systematic literature research was performed on PubMed following the PRISMA statement. The keywords used were: “Diabetes; Periodontitis; Non-surgical periodontal therapy”. Only free full texts and abstracts in English were enrolled considering a time range of the last 10 years, from 2011 to 2021. A total of 308 studies arose from the first search, and only 73 were strictly related to our topic, while 235 were excluded. The bidirectional link between diabetes and periodontitis is well known. To the best of our knowledge, in the last 10 years there is increasing evidence that non-surgical periodontal treatment is associated with improved glycemic control. Further studies are needed to empower this relation. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Oral Hygiene and Oral Health: Now More Connected Than Ever)
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