Special Issue "Gothic American Imaginaries: The Gothics of Race in American Literature and Film"

A special issue of Humanities (ISSN 2076-0787). This special issue belongs to the section "Literature in the Humanities".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (15 August 2023) | Viewed by 760

Special Issue Editor

Department of English, University of South Carolina Union, Union, SC 29379, USA
Interests: early American literature; gothic American literature; early transatlantic studies

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Since Leslie Fiedler’s seminal Love and Death in the American Novel, a litany of scholars has explored the mingling of race and Gothicism in American literary and cinematic production. Building on Fiedler’s work, scholars such as Kari Winter, Teresa A. Goddu, Charles Crow, Michelle Burnham, Justin Edwards, Sian Silyn Roberts, Ellen Weinauer, Robin R. Means Coleman, and others have produced important analyses of how race and the Gothic shape and challenge American myths of social and economic equality. Indeed, Fiedler’s assertion that “certain special guilts await[e] projection in the gothic form” continues to ring true for contemporary writers and film makers. Colson Whitehead, Gloria Naylor, Toni Morrison, Matt Ruff, and Leonard Pitts, Jr. are just a few writers who rely on Gothic tropes to explore issues of race in American society, whereas film makers such as Jordan Peele, Misha Green, Little Marvin, Quentin Tarantino, and Ted Geoghegan utilize Gothic tropes to address the horrors of injustice directed towards African Americans and Native Americans. Of course, these contemporary writers and film makers draw from a rich tradition of American Gothic literary and cinematic expression.   

This Special Issue seeks scholarly articles that examine how past or present American writers and/or film makers explore issues of race in Gothic storytelling. Some questions to consider: 

  • How does the Gothic narrative form open spaces for critical race theory?
  • How does Gothic storytelling contribute to specific American social movements, past or present?
  • How do lesser known/studied primary texts contribute to treatments of race in Gothic Studies?
  • Does text-to-film adaptation open new ways of examining race in Gothic narratives?
  • Does intertextuality (allusion, for example) in print text establish useful frameworks for exploring issues of race in American Gothic writing or film making? 

Please send a 300-word abstract to Andrew Pisano () by 1 December 2022. Full articles (6,000-12,000 words) due by 15 August 2023.

Dr. Andrew Pisano
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a double-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Humanities is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • gothic American
  • race
  • American literature
  • film criticism
  • American cultural studies

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

Article
“You Can Really Make the Story Your Own”: Taking Back Candyman
Humanities 2023, 12(5), 103; https://doi.org/10.3390/h12050103 - 18 Sep 2023
Viewed by 222
Abstract
This essay offers a comparative analysis of Bernard Rose’s 1992 Candyman and its 2021 sequel directed by Nia DaCosta. Through an intertextual approach informed by gothic studies, narratology, and critical race theory, the essay shows how DaCosta’s film establishes a transformative relationship with [...] Read more.
This essay offers a comparative analysis of Bernard Rose’s 1992 Candyman and its 2021 sequel directed by Nia DaCosta. Through an intertextual approach informed by gothic studies, narratology, and critical race theory, the essay shows how DaCosta’s film establishes a transformative relationship with its predecessor. In the 2021 film, Candyman rewrites the story of the original, disrupts its stereotypical representation of Blackness, and appropriates the horror genre to give voice to the peculiar anxieties of contemporary African American life. In so doing, DaCosta’s film also challenges classic gothic tropes of horrific Blackness while at the same time pushing back against dominant narratives on race to reclaim space for a discussion on racial relations in America filtered through a Black lens. Full article
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