Storytelling, Body, and Disability in Fiction and Popular Culture

A special issue of Humanities (ISSN 2076-0787).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (1 June 2023) | Viewed by 5837

Special Issue Editor

Department of Languages and Literature, Northeastern State University, Tahlequah, OK 74464, USA
Interests: 19th century British and Russian fiction; Victorian fiction; Romanticism; Gothic literature; fairy tales; folklore and mythology; gender roles; war fiction

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The individual body performatively constitutes its gender, experiences desire for other (individual) bodies, undergoes significant changes, and functions as the battlefield for a range of social and political struggles. However, the collective body in groups provides an equally productive basis for the analysis and interpretation of gendered and sexual processes. The human body is never neutral, and many works of fiction give meaning to a disintegrated, disable, diseased, wounded, damaged, mutilated body through the power of language.

For this Special Issue, we seek papers on all aspects of body, storytelling, and disability: in lived experiences, in public discourse, in popular media, in rhetoric of health and wellness, in educational institutions, and in built environments. We are open to submissions from researchers that consider their work from intersectional and intertextual perspectives.

Subtopics:

  • Construction and representation of the body.
  • Modernity and the body.
  • Body positivity in fiction, popular culture, and media.
  • Body politic, society, biopolitics, and state.
  • Body in cyber-culture and cyberspaces.
  • Body and medical sciences.
  • Body as resistance.
  • Body, film, and the visual arts.
  • Gendering the body, hyper masculinity, the female body, and LGBTIQA+.
  • Dis/ability and caregiving.
  • Genocide and the body.
  • The body as a performance.
  • The body as transformation.
  • Body inclusivity and creativity.

Dr. Irina Strout
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information 

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a double-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Humanities is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • body
  • disability
  • storytelling
  • gender studies
  • race
  • sexuality
  • class
  • identity
  • crisis
  • fiction
  • popular culture

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

11 pages, 248 KiB  
Article
Jane Austen’s Persuasion: Finding Companionate Marriage through Sickness and Health
Humanities 2023, 12(5), 114; https://doi.org/10.3390/h12050114 - 10 Oct 2023
Viewed by 1272
Abstract
In Jane Austen’s last novel Persuasion (1817), embodiment and disability function metonymically to show the emotional suffering of its characters. Austen gives temporary impairments to the novel’s protagonists, Anne Elliot and Captain Frederick Wentworth, and physical disabilities to minor characters who suffer actual [...] Read more.
In Jane Austen’s last novel Persuasion (1817), embodiment and disability function metonymically to show the emotional suffering of its characters. Austen gives temporary impairments to the novel’s protagonists, Anne Elliot and Captain Frederick Wentworth, and physical disabilities to minor characters who suffer actual and metaphorical falls, such as Louisa Musgrove and Mrs. Smith. In Persuasion, Austen evokes pain and suffering in both mental and physical ways, with men, like Wentworth, experiencing mental impairments and women, like Anne, Louisa, and Mrs. Smith, experiencing physical impairments. Austen uses impairments, illness, and disability as prostheses to highlight the importance of a marriage of respect, affection, and rationality. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Storytelling, Body, and Disability in Fiction and Popular Culture)
14 pages, 280 KiB  
Article
Out of Time: Disabling Normative Time in Charlotte Brontë’s Jane Eyre and Wilkie Collins’s The Woman in White
Humanities 2023, 12(4), 64; https://doi.org/10.3390/h12040064 - 13 Jul 2023
Viewed by 1261
Abstract
Responding to ableist and regimented notions of time, disabled activists and disability studies scholars alike have embraced “crip time” as a modality that better accounts for the ways disability transforms chronology. By applying this critical disability framework to depictions of time in Victorian [...] Read more.
Responding to ableist and regimented notions of time, disabled activists and disability studies scholars alike have embraced “crip time” as a modality that better accounts for the ways disability transforms chronology. By applying this critical disability framework to depictions of time in Victorian literature, my paper reveals the generative potential of nonnormative understandings of time in two foundational and widely studied texts: Charlotte Brontë’s Jane Eyre and Wilkie Collins’s The Woman in White. In each text, the presence of disability allows for the resistance to and subversion of hegemonic (and genre-based) modes of temporality. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Storytelling, Body, and Disability in Fiction and Popular Culture)
13 pages, 285 KiB  
Article
Unveiling the Oppressed Body: Female Dalit Body Politics in India through Baburao Bagul and Yashica Dutt
Humanities 2023, 12(4), 63; https://doi.org/10.3390/h12040063 - 12 Jul 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 2709
Abstract
India’s complex social fabric is marked by a rigid caste system that has perpetuated discrimination and marginalisation for centuries. The caste structure not only establishes clear boundaries between castes through endogamous social relations, but also determines control over resources, productivity, and sexuality. Among [...] Read more.
India’s complex social fabric is marked by a rigid caste system that has perpetuated discrimination and marginalisation for centuries. The caste structure not only establishes clear boundaries between castes through endogamous social relations, but also determines control over resources, productivity, and sexuality. Among the most vulnerable groups within this hierarchical structure are Dalit women, who face compounded forms of oppression due to their caste and gender, spanning economic, physical, and mental aspects. At the core of this oppression lies the Dalit woman’s body, a battleground where power dynamics intersect and the struggle for autonomy and dignity unfolds. This paper delves into the exploration of female Dalit body politics in India, with a particular focus on two influential literary works: Baburao Bagul’s When I Hid My Caste (2018) and Yashica Dutt’s Coming Out as Dalit (2019). The aim is to unveil, through these texts, the intersectionality of caste and gender, both past and present, revealing the violence, exploitation, and marginalisation that reflects on the Dalit female body, stemming from and affecting the economic, physical, and psychological dimension. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Storytelling, Body, and Disability in Fiction and Popular Culture)
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