Biological Control of Plant Pathogens: From Field to Fork

A special issue of Horticulturae (ISSN 2311-7524). This special issue belongs to the section "Plant Pathology and Disease Management (PPDM)".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 January 2024) | Viewed by 2729

Special Issue Editors

Poznan Science and Technology Park, Adam Mickiewicz University Foundation, Rubiez 46 Street, 61-612 Poznan, Poland
Interests: plant resistance induction; biostimulants; biological control agents
Dr. Henryk Pospieszny
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Institute of Plant Protection, National Research Institute, 60-318 Poznan, Poland
Interests: natural-derived plant resistance inducers; phytohormones; viral diseases

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Horticulture crops offer numerous benefits to individuals, communities, and the environment. Among them, nutritional values, economic importance, and contribution to biodiversity are to be highlighted. However, horticulture production is threatened by emerging and increasingly severe losses due to pathogens. The assurance of effective plant protection cannot occur without ignoring the safety aspects of the methods used and their environmental impact.

The desire to reach sustainability and environmental protection goals has stimulated the search for new and effective methods, employing novel active ingredients of natural origin that satisfy legal requirements, environmental issues, and societal expectations. Thus, an environmentally friendly and economically viable alternative to conventional methods in the form of biological control has gained considerable attention.

The Special Issue focuses on the diverse and dynamic field of biological control in plant pathology, spanning from the initial stages in the field to the ultimate goal of ensuring food safety from Field to Fork. The transition from the field to the food supply chain requires studies on the impact of biological control on crop yield, post-harvest disease management, and the overall quality and safety of agricultural products. Additionally, the safety and perception of biocontrol agents by consumers and regulatory measures for their implementation are to be discussed to ensure their acceptance and successful integration into modern agricultural practices.

This Special Issue welcomes studies concerning research from multidisciplinary experts, offering a comprehensive exploration of recent advances and future prospects in biological control strategies against plant pathogens.

Dr. Rafał Kukawka
Dr. Henryk Pospieszny
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Horticulturae is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2200 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • biological control
  • plant pathogens
  • horticultural plants
  • food security
  • post-harvest disease management
  • sustainability

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

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16 pages, 14796 KiB  
Article
Can Chitosan Applications in Pre- and Post-Harvest Affect the Quality and Antioxidant Contents of Red Raspberries?
Horticulturae 2023, 9(10), 1135; https://doi.org/10.3390/horticulturae9101135 - 14 Oct 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1200
Abstract
Red raspberry fruit production is increasing worldwide due to the growing consumer interest in foods with high antioxidant properties. However, raspberries are very perishable fruit with a short shelf life. Chitosan applications have shown promising results in promoting the storage of different berry [...] Read more.
Red raspberry fruit production is increasing worldwide due to the growing consumer interest in foods with high antioxidant properties. However, raspberries are very perishable fruit with a short shelf life. Chitosan applications have shown promising results in promoting the storage of different berry fruit. This work aimed at analysing the effects of chitosan applied in pre- and/or post-harvest on the quality and antioxidant properties of raspberry fruit during cold storage and room temperature conditions (i.e., 6 d at 4 °C and 3 d at 20 °C, respectively). Pre-harvest chitosan applications reduced fruit weight loss during cold storage and room temperature conditions but also reduced fruit decay at room temperature conditions. At the end of the whole storage conditions, chitosan-coated raspberries at pre-harvest were brighter than those of the uncoated control fruit. Furthermore, pre-harvest treatments with chitosan increased the total phenol and anthocyanin contents and promoted the highest total antioxidant activity compared with other treatments. After cold storage, post-harvest chitosan application drastically reduced the development of fungi that cause fruit decay, thus minimizing the potential risk of mycotoxin production. Overall, this study demonstrates that applications of chitosan in pre-harvest are sufficient to ensure the goal of maintaining and/or increasing fruit quality and antioxidant properties during cold storage and room temperature conditions. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Biological Control of Plant Pathogens: From Field to Fork)
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Review

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29 pages, 455 KiB  
Review
Microbial Allies in Agriculture: Harnessing Plant Growth-Promoting Microorganisms as Guardians against Biotic and Abiotic Stresses
Horticulturae 2024, 10(1), 12; https://doi.org/10.3390/horticulturae10010012 - 23 Dec 2023
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Abstract
Plants face many biological and non-biological challenges throughout their life cycle, from seed to harvest. These challenges have recently increased due to climate changes. Strategies for confronting different types of stresses depend on the type of stress, the cultivated plant, climatic conditions, soil [...] Read more.
Plants face many biological and non-biological challenges throughout their life cycle, from seed to harvest. These challenges have recently increased due to climate changes. Strategies for confronting different types of stresses depend on the type of stress, the cultivated plant, climatic conditions, soil characteristics, water variables, cost, and management system. Chemical methods (fertilizers and pesticides) have been widely used to manage abiotic and biotic stresses, but they raise concerns about environmental contamination, toxic residues, and the development of resistant pathogens. Eco-friendly strategies have recently become one of the most important approaches to obtaining high-quality and quantitative plant-based products. Microbial inoculants, such as plant growth-promoting microorganisms (PGPM), offer a sustainable alternative to chemical methods. PGPM can augment plant growth and nutrition, improve plant tolerance to abiotic stresses, and reduce the growth of certain pathogens. They employ a variety of mechanisms to alleviate stressors and boost plant resilience, including nutrient assimilation, production of metabolites, and activation of systemic resistance. This review aims to elucidate the impact of PGPM, with a particular focus on plant growth-promoting bacteria (PGPB), and their mechanisms of action on plants under varying stressors, while also identifying areas for further research in both PGPB and other non-bacterial organisms. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Biological Control of Plant Pathogens: From Field to Fork)
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