Special Issue "New Challenge of Horticultural Crops under Climate Change"

A special issue of Horticulturae (ISSN 2311-7524). This special issue belongs to the section "Biotic and Abiotic Stress".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (20 November 2023) | Viewed by 3349

Special Issue Editors

Institute of Research on Terrestrial Ecosystems (IRET), National Research Council (CNR), Via Marconi 2, 05010 Porano, Italy
Interests: food analysis; spectroscopy; chromatography; isotopes; biochemistry; food certification; food traceability
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals
Department of Agricultural, Food, and Environmental Sciences (DSA3), University of Perugia, Via Borgo XX Giugno 74, 06121 Perugia, Italy
Interests: mechanical harvest; breeding and clonal selection of new varieties; abiotic stress; fruit growth; ripening indexes
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Climate change is causing global warming and modification of the amount and distribution of precipitation, with more frequent extreme events such as heat waves, drought, and flooding. Such unpredictable variability is posing major challenges influencing the performance of agriculture including annual and perennial horticulture crops. Reduction in the production of fruits and vegetables is likely to be caused by a short growing period, which will have a negative impact on growth and development particularly due to terminal heat stress and decreased water availability. This can affect food availability at the global level.

The purpose of this Special Issue “New Challenge of Horticultural Crops under Climate Change” is to present innovative studies, tools, approaches, and techniques that have been successful in addressing some of these concerns, such as the use of location-specific climate-smart horticulture, the selection of resilient species/cultivar to vulnerable conditions, the adoption of production systems for improved water-use efficiency and to adapt to the hot and dry conditions. The evaluation of physiological and agronomical performances of the different horticultural crops will allow for validation of the adopted strategies and to indicate the best cultivation practices with the aim of improving the efficiency and sustainability of horticultural crops.

Dr. Silvia Portarena
Dr. Daniela Farinelli
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

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Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

12 pages, 2118 KiB  
Article
Plant Growth Promoting Bacteria for Aquaponics as a New Strategy That Grants Quality and Nutrient Efficiency in Kohlrabi Cultivation
Horticulturae 2023, 9(12), 1299; https://doi.org/10.3390/horticulturae9121299 - 02 Dec 2023
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Abstract
Consumers are becoming increasingly concerned about eating healthy, and the products they consume are produced in an environmentally friendly way. Therefore, in this work, production techniques such as aquaculture and the use of plant growth-promoting bacteria in kohlrabi cultivation (Brassica oleracea L.) [...] Read more.
Consumers are becoming increasingly concerned about eating healthy, and the products they consume are produced in an environmentally friendly way. Therefore, in this work, production techniques such as aquaculture and the use of plant growth-promoting bacteria in kohlrabi cultivation (Brassica oleracea L.) were studied. To this end, we applied three types of irrigation treatments (control, mixed water (50% fish effluent/50% drainage water) (mixed water), and mixed water enriched with synthetic fertilizers (mixed water + S)) combined with two formulations of plant growth-promoting bacteria (B1 and B2) in kohlrabi plants. Our data showed that the B1 inoculum combined with control irrigation caused both the increase in dry matter and the diameter of the bulb (17.8% and 8.9%, respectively); moreover, this inoculum increased the concentration of Ca when applied with mixed irrigation solution (water + S), and Zn for the B2 inoculum. The nitrogen utilization efficiency (NUtE) was augmented by the mixed irrigation treatment, with the lowest concentration of nitrates observed in the bulbs. Both inocula increased the total phenolic compounds in the control irrigation, whilst an increase in fructose and sucrose concentrations was only observed with B2. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue New Challenge of Horticultural Crops under Climate Change)
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14 pages, 5072 KiB  
Article
Growth, Phenotypic Plasticity and Fruit Quality in Tomato: A Study under High Temperature and Elevated CO2
Horticulturae 2023, 9(12), 1266; https://doi.org/10.3390/horticulturae9121266 - 24 Nov 2023
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Abstract
We assessed the emergence, growth, phenotypic plasticity and quality of both landrace and commercial tomato fruits under conditions of elevated temperature and increased CO2 concentrations [CO2]. Four growth chambers were used in which temperature and [CO2] differed: LTLC [...] Read more.
We assessed the emergence, growth, phenotypic plasticity and quality of both landrace and commercial tomato fruits under conditions of elevated temperature and increased CO2 concentrations [CO2]. Four growth chambers were used in which temperature and [CO2] differed: LTLC (30 °C, 400 µmol CO2 mol−1), LTHC (30 °C, 1200 µmol CO2 mol−1), HTLC (40 °C, 400 µmol CO2 mol−1) and HTHC (40 °C, 1200 µmol CO2 mol−1). The acronyms indicate the following: LT, low temperature; HT, high temperature; LC, low [CO2]; and HC, high [CO2]. Elevated temperatures significantly affected emergence in both genotypes, with the rate decreasing below 35% at HT compared to over 95% at LT. At HT, seedlings died before producing true leaves. This increase in temperature negatively affected plant growth, though HC produced some compensatory growth promotion. Regarding HT and CO2 interactions, HC failed to counteract the negative impacts of HT. The commercial variety showed a higher relative distance plasticity index (RDPI) under HT, whereas the landrace showed greater plasticity in plant height under HC. The largest fruit sizes were observed at LT, whereas no fruits were found at HTLC. Elevated temperature at HC resulted in enhanced total phenol content and increased antioxidant activity in the fruits. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue New Challenge of Horticultural Crops under Climate Change)
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12 pages, 1949 KiB  
Article
Fruit Phenology of Two Hazelnut Cultivars and Incidence of Damage by Halyomorpha halys in Treated and Untreated Hazel Groves
Horticulturae 2023, 9(6), 727; https://doi.org/10.3390/horticulturae9060727 - 20 Jun 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 863
Abstract
Over the past decade, Halyomorpha halys has become one of the main threats to hazelnut production. Its trophic activity makes kernels inedible due to strongly detrimental effects on the organoleptic quality. Its management in Italy is still tricky due to the lack of [...] Read more.
Over the past decade, Halyomorpha halys has become one of the main threats to hazelnut production. Its trophic activity makes kernels inedible due to strongly detrimental effects on the organoleptic quality. Its management in Italy is still tricky due to the lack of effective native biocontrol agents and authorized and effective insecticides. A field test was performed on San Giovanni (SG) and Tonda Romana (TR) cultivars (early and late ripening, respectively) to assess the intensity of cimiciato damage with different pest management approaches (no insecticide and integrated pest management, IPM). Moreover, phenological analysis of fruits and the monitoring of stink bug species by traps and plant beating were carried out. In the untreated plots, the SG cv showed a higher cimiciato incidence with respect to the late TR cv (40% SG–NI vs. 23% TR–NI). This was probably due to the different phenological phases in which stink bugs injured the fruits. In fact, stink bug bites provoke different kinds of injuries (blanks, shriveled, and cimiciato) according to the fruit’s development period. Indeed, in the period of highest insect occurrence in the field, the fruits of the early cv (SG) were in kernel expansion, a phenological phase in which bug injuries are more likely in cimiciato defects. Lastly, the IPM did not provide sufficient fruit protection (19% SG–IPM vs. 11% TR–IPM). The interaction between the phenological development of hazelnuts and the brown marmorated stink bug represents a critical aspect in understanding and implementing effective strategies for controlling this key pest on hazelnut trees. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue New Challenge of Horticultural Crops under Climate Change)
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18 pages, 2711 KiB  
Article
Trend Analysis of Different Climate Parameters and Watering Requirements for Hazelnut in Central Italy Related to Climate Change
Horticulturae 2023, 9(5), 593; https://doi.org/10.3390/horticulturae9050593 - 17 May 2023
Viewed by 793
Abstract
In this study, the effects of climate change on the irrigation water requirement of hazelnut trees were investigated in Central Italy. The meteorological variables considered were precipitation, temperature, chilling units, and the Standardized Precipitation Index (SPI) in Central Italy. The hydrological variables were [...] Read more.
In this study, the effects of climate change on the irrigation water requirement of hazelnut trees were investigated in Central Italy. The meteorological variables considered were precipitation, temperature, chilling units, and the Standardized Precipitation Index (SPI) in Central Italy. The hydrological variables were the reference evapotranspiration (ET0) and the water requirement based on soil water balance. Climate data were collected from eight meteorological stations for the period 1974–2021, and ET0 was estimated by the Hargreaves and Samani equation. The SPI index was calculated for a four-month time scale corresponding to the hazelnut growing season (April–August). A statistical analysis of the trends of the variables considered was conducted. The results showed an increasing trend for temperature, ET0, and water requirements, while a decreasing trend was shown for the chilling units. No significant trends were detected for precipitation and SPI. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue New Challenge of Horticultural Crops under Climate Change)
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